PR Firm Launches Campaign To Defend Biodiversity, Stop Deforestation

Deforestation Promoting Climate Change, Loss Of Biodiversity

Deforestation generates about 20 percent of greenhouse gasses and cripples our planet’s ability to filter carbon dioxide from our air. Unfortunately, deforestation also threatens entire watersheds, endangered species and endangered cultures around the world. An international PR firm based in Phoenix, Arizona has launched a program to help reverse deforestation, while defending entire ecosystems.

If all CO2 emissions stopped today, climate change will still intensify because of existing carbon in the atmosphere. Energy conservation, renewable energy and sustainable agriculture are vital, but we need proven carbon capture strategies to help restore balance to our atmosphere. Forest conservation is more important than ever.

deforestation and endangered species

“Thousands of community stakeholders across East Africa are ready to act now,” said Gary Chandler founder of both Crossbow Communications and its subsidiary Sacred Seedlings. “They can help us all fight global climate change, while defending critical ecosystems in Tanzania, Kenya and beyond. We’re launching a campaign to help them secure the resources to succeed.”

According to Chandler, several NGOs, including the Mellowswan Foundation Africa-Tanzania have plans to save remaining forests in the region, while promoting reforestation, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. The program will plant more than 10 million new seedlings just in the Kilimanjaro ecosystem.

A new report by the United Nations Environment Programme says that protecting East Africa’s mountain ecosystems would safeguard the region’s $7 billion tourism industry, not to mention the lives of millions of people and iconic endangered species.

“Across the continent, the damage done to these ecosystems is depriving people of the basic building blocks of life,” said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment agency.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

He said Mt. Kilimanjaro was an example of how climate change was severely damaging Africa’s mountains and the people who depend on them. Mt. Kilimanjaro, the highest in Africa, contributes to more than a third of Tanzania’s revenue from tourism but is facing several problems, ranging from shrinking glaciers to rampant wild fires. As climate change intensifies, it is essential that governments act swiftly to prevent more harm and more downward momentum. The report urges Tanzania to protect the mountain’s water catchment area by reforestation, investing in early warning systems and making climate adaptation a top priority.

Forests are critical to the way Earth functions. They lock up vast amounts of carbon and release oxygen. They influence rainfall, filter fresh water and prevent flooding and soil erosion. They produce wild foods, fuel wood and medicines for the people who live in and around them. They are storehouses of potential future crop varieties and genetic materials with untapped healing qualities. Wood and other fibre grown in forests can be used as a renewable fuel or as raw material for paper, packaging, furniture or housing.

While the pressures on forests vary across regions, the biggest cause of deforestation is expanding agriculture – including commercial livestock and major crops such as palm oil and soy. According to Chandler, Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, carbon capture, reforestation, urban forestry,sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems, including millions of people who live in the region.

Tanzania lion conservation

Loss of forests isn’t the only problem in East Africa. Tanzania may have lost half its elephant population since 2007. It could be wiped out entirely in just seven years. Kenya’s wildlife also is under assault like never before. Adding to the crisis, there has been loss of wildlife habitat and biodiversity as a result of fragmentation and loss of critical ecosystem linkages and over-exploitation of the natural habitats. This loss of habitat brings humans and wildlife into more and more conflict over food, water and space–which means more bloodshed.

Tanzania’s elephant population declined from an estimated 109,000 elephants in 2009 to around 70,000 in 2012. Approximately 30 elephants are killed for their ivory every day.

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Thanks to the leadership of NGOs and stakeholders in East Africa, we now have 14 comprehensive plans that can fight global climate change, while defending cultures, communities and entire ecosystems. We need your help.

Read More About Deforestation and Loss of Biodiversity at http://crossbowcommunications.com/deforestation-contributing-to-climate-change-loss-of-biodiversity/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications is a full-service advertising agency and public relations firm in Denver, Colorado and Phoenix, Arizona. The PR firm specializes in issue management and public affairs.

Deforestation Contributing To Climate Change, Extinction

Forest Conservation Critical To Life

Forest conservation is critical to life as we know it. Forests sequester carbon and release oxygen. They influence rainfall, filter fresh water and prevent flooding and soil erosion. They produce wild foods, fuelwood and medicines. While the pressures on our vanishing forests vary around the world, the biggest cause of deforestation is expanding agriculture – including commercial livestock and major crops such as palm oil and soy.

Small-scale farmers also play a role as they often slash and burn land every year just to survive. Mining, hydroelectricity and new roads add to the pressure on vanishing forests around the globe.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

Deforestation has caused about 20 percent of the rise in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The rise in greenhouse gases, both human caused and natural, is contributing to unprecedented levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, which contributes to climate change, extreme weather and threats to life as we know it.

Deforestation also cripples our planet’s capacity to capture carbon from the atmosphere, while contributing to the loss of endangered species, including orangutans, tigers, elephants and many others.

Trees and forests can capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air, return the oxygen to the atmosphere and store the carbon for centuries. Deforestation is disrupting this vital system, while contributing to global warming and climate change.

Forests can absorb some of the carbon dioxide that we all produce in our daily lives. Unfortunately, our remaining forests are under siege. We can reverse the trend now by demanding forest conservation and reforesting as much land as possible.

If we could stop tropical deforestation today, allow damaged forests to grow back, and protect mature forests, the resulting reduction in emissions and removal of carbon from the atmosphere could equal up to one-third of current global emissions from all sources. Reforestation is a critical part of the solution to many of our most pressing sustainability challenges.

Many developing countries have indicated that they would be willing to reduce emissions further in return for international financial support. Rich countries could do more to fight climate change at lower cost by financing tropical forest conservation in addition to their own domestic emission cuts. The few REDD+ agreements already in place have priced avoided CO2 emissions at only $5 per ton, truly a bargain compared to most other options.

In both Brazil and Indonesia, national efforts to reduce deforestation have been associated with greater transparency, increased law enforcement targeted at forest-related crime and corruption and steps to strengthen the land rights of indigenous peoples. A broad coalition of governments, multinational corporations, non-governmental organizations and indigenous groups recognized these potential benefits in the September 2014 New York Declaration on Forests.

wildlife conservation Africa

Stakeholders across East Africa are ready to act now. They can help us all fight global climate change, while defending critical ecosystems in Tanzania, Kenya and beyond.

We have approved plans to plant more than 110 million new trees on millions of hectares in Tanzania and Kenya alone. We’re developing more reforestation and agroforestry projects around the world, which will:

  • Absorb carbon dioxide to battle climate change;
  • Defend ecosystems and biodiversity;
  • Preserve watersheds and control flooding;
  • Preserve and create habitat for wildlife;
  • Preserve local lifestyles and cultures, while promoting sustainability; and
  • Create jobs for men and women that can help defend endangered ecosystems.

A new report by the United Nations Environment Programme says that protecting East Africa’s mountain ecosystems would safeguard the region’s $7 billion tourism industry, not to mention the lives of millions of people and iconic endangered species.

“Across the continent, the damage done to these ecosystems is depriving people of the basic building blocks of life,” said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment agency.

He said Mt. Kilimanjaro was an example of how climate change was severely damaging Africa’s mountains and the people who depend on them. Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest in Africa, contributes to more than a third of Tanzania’s revenue from tourism but is facing several problems, ranging from shrinking glacier to rampant wild fires. As climate change intensifies, it is essential that governments act swiftly to prevent more harm and more downward momentum. The report urges Tanzania to protect the mountain’s water catchment area by reforestation, investing in early warning systems and making climate adaptation a top priority.

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public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications is a full-service advertising agency and public relations firm in Denver, Colorado and Phoenix, Arizona. The firm specializes in issue management and public affairs.

UN Report Urges Reforestation Of Mt. Kilimanjaro

Climate Change Threatens Water Supplies Across East Africa

The greater Kilimanjaro region is one of the most threatened ecosystems on the planet. A new report by the United Nations Environment Programme says that protecting East Africa’s mountain ecosystems would safeguard the region’s $7 billion tourism industry, not to mention the lives of millions of people and iconic endangered species.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

“Across the continent, the damage done to these ecosystems is depriving people of the basic building blocks of life,” said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment agency.

He said Mt. Kilimanjaro was an example of how climate change was severely damaging Africa’s mountains and the people who depend on them. Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest in Africa, contributes to more than a third of Tanzania’s revenue from tourism but is facing several problems, ranging from shrinking glacier to rampant wild fires. As climate change intensifies, it is essential that governments act swiftly to prevent more harm and more downward momentum. The report urges Tanzania to protect the mountain’s water catchment area by reforestation, investing in early warning systems and making climate adaptation a top priority.

Mt. Kilimanjaro’s forests are a vital source of water for the surrounding towns and the wider region. Water from the mountain feeds one of Tanzania’s largest rivers, the Pangani.

The report titled Sustainable Mountain Development in East Africa in a Changing Climate warned that the glaciers are likely to vanish completely within a few decades as a result of climate change if urgent action is not taken. Meanwhile, higher temperatures have increased the number of wildfires, which have destroyed 13,000 hectares of the mountain’s forest since 1976.

forest conservation Tanzania and Kenya

The town of Moshi, which is located in the foothills of Mt. Kilimanjaro, is already experiencing severe water shortages as rivers begin to dry up, starving farmland of water in an area already struggling to cope with a dramatic drop in rainfall.

The report was produced by UN Environment, GRID-Arendal, East African Community, the Albertine Rift Conservation Society and Nature-RIDD. It was produced as part of the Mountain Adaptation Outlook Series, which was launched by the UN Environment Programme at the climate talks in Paris in 2015.

global reforestation and climate change

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support.

Read More About Our Program To Reforest Mt. Kilimanjaro and all of East Africa http://sacredseedlings.com/un-supports-reforesting-kilimanjaro/

Tanzania Loses More Than Half Of Elephants In Past Decade

Proposed Program Will Defend Ecosystems, Wildlife

The Kilimanjaro region of East Africa is one of the most threatened ecosystems on earth. Millions of people and several endangered species depend on the snows and rains of Kilimanjaro for survival. As land use encroaches further into local forests, water flows are changing and conflicts with wildlife are rising. A nonprofit organization in Tanzania hopes to reverse those trends with a comprehensive forest conservation, reforestation and community-engagement program.

Save Kilimanjar

The Mellowswan Foundation Africa-Tanzania will defend the greater Kilimanjaro ecosystem with more than 10 million new seedlings, community engagement, wildlife conservation strategies and more. They will educate local stakeholders about sustainable forestry, sustainable agriculture and wildlife management. Unlike past reforestation efforts in the region, it will focus on local needs and long-term sustainability. The seedlings are indigenous species that can help restore and protect the integrity of the ecosystem, while helping rural communities thrive as stewards of the land.

Save Kilimanjaro

Unfortunately, forests across the region are retreating under the pressures of agriculture and communities that depend on firewood.

Climate change is impacting every continent. Deforestation and intensive agriculture are contributing to the problem. Fortunately, forest conservationreforestation, and sustainable agriculture are part of the solution.

The foundation plans to save wildlife, capture carbon and reduce deforestation on a massive scale. This investment will benefit the entire planet, while preserving a world treasure.

wildlife conservation Tanzania

Tanzania lost more than half of its elephants to poachers over the past decade. They could be wiped out entirely in just five or six years. Adding to the crisis, there has been loss of wildlife habitat and biodiversity as a result of fragmentation and loss of critical ecosystem linkages and over-exploitation of the natural habitats. This loss of habitat brings humans and wildlife into more and more conflict over food, water and space–which means more bloodshed.

“We have some powerful sponsorship packages,” said Crossbow President Gary Chandler. “We also have some very unique rewards for donors. Please help spread the word to your friends, families and favorite companies. This is a very important program to the entire world.”

elephant conservation Tanzania

Please Help Save Kilimanjaro and beyond https://www.gofundme.com/SaveKilimanjaro

Tanzania lion conservation

Conservation Plans Must Include Community Stakeholders To Succeed

Villagers Caught In The Crossfire Of Economics, Land Use

Surrounded by a wall of fire and angry Tanzanian villagers, the elephants were forced off a cliff some 50 meters high. When the dust settled, six of the herd lay dead. The now jubilant crowd took photos of themselves among the carcasses.

It was a violent climax to a long-simmering conflict, which saw farmers regularly lose harvests as protected elephants raided their crops. But on that summer’s evening in 2009, the inhabitants of West Kilimanjaro reached breaking point, says Sayuni Mariki at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

Unfortunately, the incident is far from an isolated one. People regularly risk injury and prosecution to attack protected wildlife. Tigers and leopards have been beaten to death, wolves are illegally hunted and birds of prey fall victim to poison, to name just a few.

On the surface the motives seem simple: protecting people and their property. Scratch a little deeper though, says Mariki, and it becomes clear that the animals are often just convenient scapegoats. The real hatred is reserved for conservationists and government officials.

Mariki arrived in West Kilimanjaro in the aftermath of the elephant killings to find a disenfranchised and disillusioned village. Conservation policies had restricted access to ancestral lands, reducing the settlement to an island in a sea of game reserves. Locals watched powerlessly as private safari operators and government officials became rich from the booming tourist trade, while their crops were regularly destroyed.

Tanzania lion conservation

“Local communities feel that wild animals are valued more than people by the authorities,” says Miriki. Her interviews with those involved in the slaughter, now published, reveal that killing the elephants was as much about rebelling against this state of affairs as protecting crops and livelihoods. Similar motivations appear to drive violence in Bangladeshi villages plagued by tiger attacks.

So what is the solution? Governments should stop imposing conservation rules on communities and instead involve them in discussions, giving them power over how wildlife protection is carried out on their lands, says Francine Madden of the conservation group Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration.

Save Kilimanjaro

Offering local people a social or financial stake in conservation seems to have worked in East Africa. Here, lion-killing Masai warriors have swapped spears for radio antennas and are now among the species’ most dedicated guardians.

And in the Sundarbans region of Bangladesh a charity called Wild Team is training villagers how to deal with tiger incursions – and tiger killings are down as a result. Locals no longer feel powerless and so are less likely to take out their frustrations on an unlucky big cat, says Chloe Inskip at the University of Kent, UK, an author of the study on tiger killings in Bangladesh. “If you don’t understand these deeper levels of the conflict, it is just like putting a plaster on it without getting to the root of the problem,” she says.

Wildlife News Source: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22530034.300#.VK6kWmTF-Ws

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through its subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Tanzania Planning Carbon Capture Project

Climate Change Solutions In The Forests

Reforestation is one of the few proven carbon capture solutions available today. Thanks to our partners in East Africa, we have one of the largest carbon capture opportunities in the world and it’s ready to begin immediately.

With the help of foundations, corporations, governments, NGOs and donors, we can conserve millions of hectares of existing forests and plant more than 100 million new trees. We will plant millions of more trees in Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda.

forest conservation Tanzania and Kenya

According to very conservative estimates, the reforestation effort alone will capture 2.5 million tons of CO2 every year. The forest conservation (avoided deforestation) program will help even more.

We also have plans for smaller projects in Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda that represent an opportunity to plant millions of additional trees and much more. It’s possibly the largest carbon-capture opportunity available today and one that we can’t afford to ignore. It’s large enough to help us all fight climate change, while promoting a sustainable watershed, ecosystem and economy for more than 100 million people across East Africa.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

Please join us. We need volunteers, donations, grants, sponsors, and media coverage to kickstart this important program immediately. We also need more projects around the world. Forest conservation and reforestation can help capture carbon, defend ecosystems and the planet.

Save Kilimanjaro

We also offer voluntary carbon offsets to help organizations meet their carbon management objectives. We are working with the regulated carbon markets now to line up certifications. Learn more at http://sacredseedlings.com/east-africa-projects/

forest conservation and reforestation

Sacred Seedlings is a U.S.-based program that supports the vision of local stakeholders. We have projects ready across Africa. We seek additional projects elsewhere around the world. We also seek volunteers, sponsors and donors of cash and in-kind support. Write to Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

U.S. Teens Form Nonprofit To Help Save Elephants

Elephant Extinction Likely Within Decade

When Max Kauderer saw the body of a dead elephant during a family trip to Africa two years ago, it wasn’t only the body that horrified him; it was the apathy of the natives to seeing this gentle, intelligent creature killed.

“The rangers reacted to it as it were almost normal to them,” said Max, a 17-year-old Englewood resident. “It was just shocking to me. I could never get used to that. It showed me that they shouldn’t have to get used to this either.”

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

Seeing the murdered elephant ignited a spark in Max and his brother Josh, 16, to aid elephant conservation by starting a non-profit called “Elephant Highway,” named after the Maasai term for the paths elephants create as they travel.

While Max and Josh saw a large number of animals during their trip to Kenya and Tanzania in 2012, the two quickly fell in love with elephants. The pair were enamored with how similar elephants were to humans.

“They can show emotion, compassion and the ability to grieve,” said Max. “They play with toys, build toys and live in families. It’s pretty amazing.”

Their joy of learning more about these creatures quickly turned to horror when two park rangers came running in their lodge one afternoon, announcing that an elephant was just killed by poachers a mile and half from where the Kauderer family was staying. Max and Josh would later visit the fenced off area where the elephant was killed, where the body was still in sight.

“I knew about ivory trade and elephants being killed, but it still changes you when you see something so rapidly,” said Josh. “The smell of dead carcass; it really changes the whole situation.”

Seeing the dead elephant in person made the two brothers ask tour guides on their trip more about elephants and the ivory trade, becoming shocked about the scope of the trade.

“Crime syndicates are focusing on elephant poaching and smuggling ivory tusks,” said Josh. “It’s just as bad as any other kind of drug trade.”

According to the American Wildlife Foundation, there are 470,000 elephants remaining in 37 African countries. On a yearly basis, poachers kill 8 percent of the elephant population.

When Max and Josh returned to the United States, their experiences made them want to take a stand against poaching. They didn’t originally think of starting a non-profit, and instead focused their awareness efforts by speaking at local schools about elephant poaching. As time went on, they felt liked they wanted to do something more.

“We realized we also wanted to raise money for these organizations in Africa and make a difference there as well,” said Max.

The two went to work creating Elephant Highway, which is pending 501c3 status, to raise awareness about poaching and raise money to help African elephant conservation organizations.

The non-profit, run entirely by the two Englewood teens – which sells shirts, hoodies, and bracelets – raised approximately $10,000 since its inception in 2012. All proceeds from the merchandise, which bears the tagline “Only Elephants Should Wear Ivory,” are donated to Elephant Highway’s four non-profit partners: David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, Big Life Foundation, Hands Off Our Elephants, and International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

Tanzania lion conservation

Their dedication to protecting elephants shows in the vast array of knowledge they display on the subject.

Sitting in the Starbucks in Englewood, clad in Elephant Highway gear, the two were quick to bring up the latest in elephant poaching news, from a Chinese national being arrested for possession of 4 kilograms of ivory early this year to the latest efforts by Kenya to adopt the Kenya Wildlife Act, which increases penalties for poachers.

“Within a few years, they will be extinct if we don’t do something,” said Max.

Running a non-profit is never an easy task, but for high school students, the task becomes even more difficult when trying to balance their studies, after-school sports, and clubs. As a result, most of the work for the non-profit is done on the weekend, but the two also make sure to squeeze Elephant Highway work into their schedules.

Their non-profit also offers people a chance to “Adopt-an-Elephant,” or purchase a beaded elephant keychain made by artists in northern Kenya and South Africa. This symbolic adoption sends money back to villages in Kenya and South Africa to help village economies in the hopes people will not turn toward poaching to put food on the table, said Max

“A lot of people who kill elephants for their tusks are people who don’t really have a choice,” said Max. “They are people who live in really poor regions of Africa. They’re choosing between the lives of these elephants and the lives of their families, so a lot of the times, it’s not necessarily their fault.”

Max and Josh spend many weekends packing and shipping merchandise to supporters. They also spend nine hours twice a month at street fairs during the spring and summer in Bergen County towns and New York City, hoping to spread their message.

Max and Josh spend many weekends packing and shipping merchandise to supporters. They also spend nine hours twice a month at street fairs during the spring and summer in Bergen County towns and New York City, hoping to spread their message.

While most people are aware that elephants are killed for their ivory tusks, Max said most are shocked when they discover how large the issue has become.

“People say isn’t ivory illegal?” said Max. “They don’t realize it’s still going on. Thirty-thousand elephants were killed last year. That shocks everyone I tell it to.”

Eventually, Max and Josh would also like to expand to rhino conservation, as rhinos are similarly hunted for their horns. But for now, the two will continue to save the creatures that became part of their lives in so many ways.

“If there are no elephants, the entire ecosystems in Africa would really die,” said Max.

To learn more about Elephant Highway, visit http://www.elephanthighway.org

Source: http://www.northjersey.com/community-news/in-africa-finding-their-calling-1.745915#sthash.hzuArSHR.dpuf

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through its subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Kilimanjaro Ecosystem Under Pressure

Stakeholders Have Plans To Defend Ecosystems From Climate Change

The world is at a turning point. Ecosystems in some regions are on the verge of collapse. Balancing record human populations with diminishing and degraded natural resources is getting more challenging every day. Meanwhile, climate change is making that balancing act more complex, as agriculture, water, wildlife and communities are feeling the impact in most regions of the world.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

Because of these factors, biodiversity is under assault like never before and the web of life could collapse in some regions of the world within a few years. Each regional collapse will contribute to the global spiral. Eastern Africa is one region that’s at a critical point now. Band-aid actions won’t work. We need comprehensive programs that can address economics, education and cooperation.

Climate Change, Population Boom, Poverty Taking Toll

Thanks to collaborative and comprehensive planning by enthusiastic leaders in Kenya and Tanzania, we have a plan for a massive conservation program in Eastern Africa. These diverse stakeholders are feeling the pressures of climate change. They believe in a shift to greater sustainability. They sense the urgency of more comprehensive wildlife conservation strategies, including aggressive community engagement, education and economic development. As you will see, several stakeholder organizations are eager to take action. They have submitted five separate proposals to help address all of these issues simultaneously. We promised to do what we can to help make them a lasting reality.

forest conservation Tanzania and Kenya

My partners (certified nonprofits in Tanzania and Kenya) approached me and asked if we could help save their vanishing wildlife. We developed a collaborative plan over the past six months. Their recommendations include forest conservation, reforestation, community outreach and education, sustainable agriculture, anti-poaching projects and economic development. They have some solid plans with strong partners, including several government leaders and groups such as Jane Goodall’s Roots and Shoots.

I Need Your Help

This massive East Africa project can make a difference on many levels. I’m coordinating the entire effort because I care and because I believe in what it can accomplish in Africa and elsewhere, but it’s bigger than I am.

wildlife conservation Tanzania

I have been pulling this program together for four years. I haven’t made a dime and I will never take a salary. But I do need to cover some expenses and we do need to put some money in the hands of our partners to keep them enthused and engaged as we seek our big grants and sponsors (I could use your help there, too, if you have any contacts within corporations, foundations and/or NGOs). I will make a personal plea for your help. We need some seed money desperately to keep it moving forward at high speed.

We will make our funders shine with glowing international news, events and publicity that will last for years. It will be a branding bonanza for a sponsor and it is the right thing to do–a triple P (people, planet, profit) program of the purest pedigree. You can learn more and donate at http://sacredseedlings.com/east-africa-projects/  

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through its subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

U.S. Sending Mixed Messages On Illegal Ivory Trade

Ivory Law Falls Short On Trophy Imports

With many species of wildlife currently threatened by extinction, including the African elephant, the White House announced on Tuesday a ban on the sale of ivory within the USA. The executive order, signed by President Barack Obama, is part of a plan aiming to crack down on the trafficking of wildlife in general in the United States. The move is being hailed by animal conservationists as a “significant milestone” in the worldwide fight against poaching of the pachyderms.

poaching elephants for ivoryThe importation of ivory has been banned in the USA since 1989. However, the new plan, which is part of the National Strategy on Wildlife Trafficking, aims to go further, by banning the sale of the majority of ivory products in the country altogether, as well as limiting sport-hunted trophies to a maximum of two per hunter each year.

The problem is that despite the ban on importation, ivory products can still be found in antique and art stores in most cities across the USA, according to senior administration officials. One official, requesting anonymity, told the media that the only place to see the majesty of these items is on actual living elephants or rhinoceros, in their native habitat.

The new initiative comes as soaring ivory prices have attracted increased trafficking, mainly through criminal groups. Reportedly ivory sells these days for $1,500 per pound.

In the Africa of the past, millions of elephants used to roam the plains, but with around 35,000 elephants lost every year to poachers, the total number of elephants remaining is down to around 500,000 or possibly even less.

Dame Daphne Sheldrick is a conservationist who says that the demands could wipe out the elephant species in about 10 to 15 years. She estimates that one of these magnificent creatures is killed every 15 minutes by poachers in Africa.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

To give an example of numbers remaining, Kenya reportedly had 170,000 elephants 30 years ago, but now has only an estimated 30,000 remaining. In Gabon, alone, over a third of the country’s forest elephants have been lost in the last ten years. Reportedly in the Minkebe National Park, on the border with Cameroon, losses are even higher, with around 15,000 of the remaining 22,000 killed by poachers.

Hence the urgency is reaching a peak and in an attempt to stem the flow of ivory in illegal and other sales, the White House has now announced the ban of the sale of elephant ivory in the USA.

In 2013, Tanzania adopted a shoot to kill policy when dealing with suspected poachers.  Dubbed “Operation Terminate,” the policy apparently was working well and numbers of elephants killed was cut, but the policy was dropped due to a claim of human rights abuses in the country.

There are a few exceptions, however, to the new rules.  For instance, if sellers can prove that their item for sale is over 100 years old, this would be allowed.

wildlife conservation Tanzania

 

Also of interest is that not only elephants and rhinos will be protected by the new initiative. Animals ranging from tigers to turtles, which are often slaughtered for their hides or other parts for sale by criminal syndicates, will also come under its protection.

The video included below gives details of a recent massacre by poachers in Kenya, where an entire family of these magnificent creatures were gunned down for their ivory. Warning, the video is graphic and may upset sensitive viewers.

Officials also announced that in 2014, besides the ban of the sale of elephant ivory in the USA by the White House, Congress has given an additional $3 million to enforce the wildlife trafficking laws.

For more information about saving endangered species and endangered ecosystems in East Africa, please visit http://sacredseedlings.com/east-africa-projects/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through its subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Conservation Plan Expanding Across East Africa

Stakeholders Defending Ecosystems 

The world is at a turning point. Ecosystems in some regions of the world are on the verge of collapse. Balancing record human populations with diminishing and degraded natural resources is getting more challenging every day. Climate change is making that balancing act even more complex, as agriculture, water, wildlife and communities are feeling the impact in most regions of the world.

Because of these factors, biodiversity is under assault like never before and the web of life could collapse in some regions of the world within a few short years. Each regional collapse will contribute to the global spiral. Eastern Africa is one region that’s at a critical point. Momentum is already working against us and some fundamental priorities must emerge for immediate action.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

Thanks to some collaborative and comprehensive planning by enthusiastic leaders in Kenya and Tanzania, we have a plan for the largest conservation project in East Africa. These diverse stakeholders are feeling the pressures of climate change. They believe in a shift to greater sustainability. They sense the urgency of more comprehensive wildlife conservation strategies. They have submitted several proposals to help address all of these issues simultaneously. The plans are solid, comprehensive and sustainable. They can make a difference.

One plan can expand to become a comprehensive and sustainable economic development plan for all of Tanzania. Earth Keepers Centre in Kenya just submitted a separate reforestation proposal that can be expanded to the nations of Burundi, Rwanda and Uganda. They are all braced to make an immediate and lasting impact on the entire region. Their future depends on it. The future of life as we know it depends on their success.

forest conservation Tanzania and Kenya

Africa’s tropical belt is one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world. Millions of people across Africa have already been displaced due to drought, famine and conflict. Desertification has already taken its toll on the northern third of the continent. The tropical belt is under assault by resource-hungry humans and climate change. The humanitarian crisis is adding to the environmental crisis. Without aggressive intervention, it will escalate and the ecosystem will collapse.

In Kenya, for example, Mt. Kenya is the main source of all water. That water also is used to generate 60 percent of electricity used across the country. Unsustainable use of forest resources (water, timber, firewood) is threatening the forests and the local livelihoods.

The conservation problems, like the destruction of indigenous trees for illegal fuel-wood, timber and charcoal trade, debarking and poaching of small animals, are caused by the local communities who are mainly ignorant of the importance of these ecosystems.

Elsewhere in Africa, investments from India and China have created an economic boom. This economic disparity—including the entitlement of the investors, myths, cultural factors, and corruption—is driving a devastating trade in illegal wildlife parts, including elephant ivory, rhino horn and others. That illegal killing of endangered species is rapidly driving them closer to extinction every day. Both the African elephant and the rhino could be poached into extinction within a decade, if drought and starvation don’t wipe them out first. Lions will go right behind them. The collapse will continue until the land won’t support man or beast. The trend is established and requires some interventions to at least slow the momentum.

Tanzania lion conservation

The snowballing confluence of environmental and economic factors threatens to alter the future of Africa and the world forever. Containing this disaster to Africa will be impossible. Therefore, the entire world has a stake in saving this delicate ecosystem and others from collapse. We can’t afford to stand by and watch.

 

The entire planet must address the issues of overpopulation, deforestation, biodiversity, poverty, endangered species, sustainable agriculture and economic development. They all are complex issues that are becoming more entwined daily. We don’t have all of the answers, but we are helping some bright and enthusiastic young leaders develop a vision and plan for a brighter Africa. So far, they have developed 13 plans across Burundi, kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. They are asking us for help. We can’t do it without you.

They have plans to fight climate change, wildlife poaching, poverty and regional sustainability. Please join us as a volunteer, networker or funder. These projects are all shovel-ready.

Sacred Seedlings is a global initiative to support forest conservation, reforestation, urban forestry, carbon capture, sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation. Sustainable land management and land use are critical to the survival of entire ecosystems. Please visit: http://sacredseedlings.com/east-africa-projects/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through its subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Kilimanjaro Reforestation Project Will Tackle Climate Change

Fight Climate Change, Poverty and Habitat Loss With Your New Website

The Internet is changing life as we know it. An international marketing agency is tapping the positive side of that dynamic to launch the “Web Of Life” campaign to help reforest the planet.

Crossbow Communications, a Denver-based advertising and public relations agency, is raising money for Sacred Seedlings, an international reforestation and forest conservation program.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

“Our partners in Tanzania have developed a plan with the forestry department to plant 10 million trees over the next five years at the foot of Mt. Kilimanjaro,” said Gary Chandler, president of Crossbow. “These trees will create jobs, preserve habitat for endangered species and help offset human contributions to climate change.”

As Chandler explained, some of the trees will be used to reforest degraded forests and deforested areas. Other species of trees will be grown to produce crops near villages and in towns and cities (coffee and cocoa, for example). Other trees will be placed near homes and buildings to protect them from the elements, reduce energy consumption, and minimize greenhouse gas emissions caused by energy demands. Sacred Seedlings also will fund several solar ovens for villagers to minimize the need to cut firewood for cooking. The company is developing similar programs around the world.

Tanzania also is one of the last strongholds for wildlife in Africa. The country known for the Serengeti National Park and other natural wonders is under siege by wildlife poachers. Last year, more than 10,000 elephants in Tanzania were slaughtered for their ivory. The strong demand for ivory in China and Thailand, for example, tempts locals in Tanzania and surrounding countries to kill elephants to feed their families. Unless economic interventions, such as job creation, succeed, the African elephant will be gone from the wild within the next decade. Rhinos and lions face the same fate.

Tanzania lion conservation

The Mellowswan Foundation Africa-Tanzania reached out to Sacred Seedlings In July in search of solutions to save the country’s iconic wildlife. The two organizations began crafting a reforestation plan to help fight poverty, climate change and wildlife poaching.

While Crossbow will sell sponsorship packages to corporations and foundations to fund the bulk of the project work, it’s launching a novel program to generate some immediate seed money for projects that are ready to proceed. According to Chandler, his web development team will donate all revenues to the “Web Of Life” campaign to raise money for reforestation. All revenues generated in this arena will be donated to Sacred Seedlings and its project partners in Tanzania.

“Our web pros will build blogs and websites for companies, small businesses, nonprofits and individuals to raise money for global reforestation,” Chandler said. “Every penny will be donated to this reforestation program. We will devote the next 10 weeks to this campaign, so please help us spread the word. It’s a great deal and an even better cause.”

The company hopes to raise $100,000 to start construction on three nurseries in shadows of Mt. Kilimanjaro in early 2014. It will cost about $1 million to build the nurseries and plant 10 million trees over the next five years. The company has several other projects in development now to accommodate growing global support for reforestation. The company’s goal is to plant as many trees as possible as fast as possible to help mitigate carbon buildup in the atmosphere, which is contributing to climate change and extreme weather events, such as the biblical floods that recently hit Colorado’s front range counties.

The “Web Of Life” campaign will include custom web/blog development on WordPress for $750 (our recommendation is to build one for you just like our site). Hosting and email services are additional. Clients must supply all copy, photos, artwork and logos. More complex sites and e-commerce sites will be assessed and estimates provided at no cost. No reasonable offer from anywhere in the world will be refused. 

Supporters will be listed and linked on the program website at http://sacredseedlings.com/tanzania-reforestation/. Supporters also can promote their involvement with the program by displaying the logo below on their site.

sacred seedlings logo

For more information about this campaign or official sponsorship opportunities, please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com 

Botswana A Leader In Elephant Conservation

Botswana Has Largest Elephant Population In The World

With more than 150,000 elephants, Botswana hosts the largest elephant population in the world, thanks to decades of heightened legal protection. This was said by Dr Chris Brooks, biodiversity coordinator at the Southern African Regional Environmental Program (SAREP), presenting on behalf of EcoStars at the handing over of the rehabilitated Shakawe Community Training and Craft Centre recently.

Botswana elephant herd

Brooks said while these gains paint a positive image for the future of the species, rural communities reliant on subsistence agriculture are often less than enthusiastic about the sight of elephants. “Crop raids, property damage, and even human attacks have made elephants an unwanted pest, threatening food security and human safety hence mitigation a necessity in the conflict,” said Brooks.

Brooks said the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is responding to these challenges by providing funding and technical assistance to EcoStars, a local organization out to conserve Botswana’s wildlife. He said EcoStars and USAID will employ innovative strategies to minimize human-elephant conflict, including the use of solar-powered electric fences and the cultivation of chili powder, a plant known to be a major irritant to elephants. He further shared with the participants, among them commissioners from Angola, Namibia and Botswana OKACOM, that the chilli pepper technique, which has seen positive results in Zimbabwe, Zambia and Namibia, will afford farmers a low-cost option to deter elephants from raiding crops and human settlements.

“These techniques will allow communities to enjoy increased food security, while also protecting elephants that have been historically shot and killed or injured when encroaching on human settlements,” he said.

Meanwhile, EcoStars and USAID will explore opportunities for communities to employ elephants to their advantage as part of a strategy to mitigate human-elephant conflict.Brooks says EcoStars will also conduct a feasibility assessment of the potential of elephant tourism that will allow tourists to stay in camp sites and possibly lodge adjacent to trails and watering holes. He further said elephant tourism would provide diversified livelihoods for low-resource communities.

“Elephant tourism is one part of a holistic, multifaceted approach to dealing with the elephant conflict,” Graham McCulloch, a director at EcoStars is quoted saying on the USAID website.

Source: http://www.mmegi.bw/index.php?sid=1&aid=969&dir=2013/June/Friday21