Water Contamination Causing Neurological Disease

Sewage Treatment Plants Transmitting Neurodegenerative Disease

Neurodegenerative disease is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. Meanwhile, death rates from most major diseases are dropping. Why the divergence?

Unfortunately, a pathogen associated with neurodegenerative disease is spreading uncontrollably. Research suggests that food and water supplies around the world have been contaminated with an unstoppable form of protein known as a prion (PREE-on). Ignorance, negligence, fraud and corruption are fanning the flames today. We’re facing an environmental nightmare.

transmissible spongiform encephalopathy

According to health officials, the epidemic will spread exponentially. The protein epidemic includes Alzheimer’s diseasemad cow diseasechronic wasting disease (deer) and many others. There is no species barrier. Some people die within weeks of symptoms, while others take years. There is no cure.

Please keep reading to find out why:

  • Alzheimer’s disease is part of a spectrum disease known as prion disease, which also includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The spectrum also is known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE);
  • Alzheimer’s disease is an infectious prion disease, which is often misdiagnosed and undiagnosed. Millions of diagnoses are being suppressed by physicians;
  • The bodily fluids of those with prion disease are infectious;
  • Wastewater treatment plants are contaminating our food and water supplies by spreading deadly prions via sewage sludge, biosolids and reclaimed wastewater. The risk assessments involving these facilities and their by-products were prepared before prions were discovered and characterized;
  • Wildlife, sea mammals, livestock and people are contracting prion disease from mismanaged sewage; 
  • Caregivers are in harm’s way because of disease mismanagement; 
  • It’s time to reclassify sewage sludge, biosolids and reclaimed wastewater as infectious waste; and 
  • It’s time to defend our food, water and air from infectious waste by enforcing the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act Of 2002 and similar laws around the world.

The Prion Epidemic

At least 50 million people around the world already have Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Millions of other cases are undiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Doctors have suppressed millions of other diagnoses. It’s an outrage. The epidemic is worse than the public knows.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Two groups of investigators at Rush University in Chicago independently analyzed the epidemic in a double-blind study. Both groups determined that Alzheimer’s-related mortality rates were several times higher than reflected by official figures.

With weak data in mind, the official death toll from Alzheimer’s disease in the U.S. alone still increased 68 percent between 2000 and 2010. Millions of additional cases went undiagnosed, misdiagnosed and misreported. The epidemic is expanding exponentially thanks to misinformation, fraud, acts of gross negligence and what appears to be deliberate attempts to put corporate profits over public health.

Pandora-like prions are out of the box and contaminating homes, communities and entire watersheds—including our food and water supplies. It’s time for government and industry to lead, follow or get out of the way of the truth and solutions.

Prion Predators

Alzheimer’s disease is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). As such, TSEs also are referred to as prion disease. The critical factor is that prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces carry deadly prions from victims. All tissue is infectious just because of the contact with the contaminated blood.

TSEs also include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in the deer family. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

prion disease epidemic

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

Prions also are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder in combat veterans and in the brain damage of athletes like football players who have suffered repeated concussions. It appears that head trauma also can trigger a cascade that converts healthy prions into deadly ones.

It doesn’t matter how the person acquires the disease, victims of prion disease are infectious long before they appear sick. These carriers are leading normal lives, while the disease incubates within. These walking victims are donating blood, eating at your favorite restaurant, going to your dentist and loading public sewer systems with every flush. Unfortunately, much of the sewage is dumped where it contaminates your food and your water.

Alzheimer's disease prevention

The Prion Problem

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it included a provision to halt research on prions in all but two laboratories. It classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and more. It was a step in the right direction.

Unfortunately, industry pressure convinced the Center For Disease Control to quietly take prions off the list of special agents two years ago. Keeping prions listed threatened to outlaw several multi-billion dollar industries. This reversal kept the floodgates open to the prion threat. Especially regarding sewage, agriculture and water reclamation industries.

The problem with prions is that they linger in the environment infinitely because they defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. Unlike viruses or bacteria, prions are not alive. Therefore, they can’t be killed. Victims contaminate cups, dishes, utensils, air and much more with just their saliva, mucus, cough or sneeze. Items exposed are hopelessly contaminated. Victims visit doctors and dentists every day. Some have surgery.

Unfortunately, surgical and dental instruments used on these victims are hopelessly contaminated. People have contracted prion disease from contaminated surgical instruments and hospitals have been successfully sued because of the negligence. Now, medical instruments are thrown away after being used on patients with known prion disease.

biosolids land application disease

If it’s impossible to stop prions in an operating room, it’s impossible to stop them in the challenging environment of a high-volume wastewater treatment facility.

Prions spread uncontrollably and contaminate everything that they touch—much like radiation. Unlike radiation, however, prions do not deplete themselves. They migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. Each victim becomes an incubator and a distributor of the Pandora-like pathogen. The human prion is resistant to both heat and chemicals. It’s reported that prions released from people are up to a hundred thousand times more difficult to deactivate than prions from most animals.

Prion diseases are killing humans, wildlife and livestock around the world today. It’s been gaining momentum over the past century. So has mismanagement by government, some researchers and industry.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

The prion problem is getting worse with rising populations, rising concentrations of people, intensive agriculture, reckless sewage disposal policies and other mismanaged pathways. As the epidemic strikes more people, the pathways for prion exposure explode and intensify. Reckless sewage disposal policies and practices alone are putting billions of innocent people in the crossfire right now. Entire watersheds are endangered thanks to a deadly pathogen that migrates, mutates and multiplies.

“The brain diseases caused by prions includes Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), and other disorders known as frontotemporal dementias,” said Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner.

The TSE epidemic represents an environmental nightmare that threatens every mammal on Earth. Prion disease is a spectrum disease. Some prions can kill people within weeks of exhibiting clinical symptoms, while others take years. Other people may not fall victim to the disease, but they can carry the pathogen internally and externally after exposure. Pathway management and pathway aversion are critical if we hope to save mammals on land and at sea.

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Doctors Mismanaging Diagnoses

Since prion disease is a spectrum disease, doctors can’t tell the difference between them. The only definitive diagnosis of a prion disease comes with an autopsy. Autopsies, however, are rarely conducted because of concerns over deadly contamination. A corpse with prion infection will contaminate all tools used by coroners and morticians. Meanwhile, fluids and liquefied organs from these bodies are dumped into the sewage system—destined for your wastewater treatment plant and then some poor farmer’s cornfield and dairy farm.

All doctors are guessing with each Alzheimer’s, CJD or Parkinson’s diagnosis based on the severity of the symptoms. Doctors are withholding millions of additional diagnoses from patients and their families. Regardless of the motive, this censorship puts an unbearable load on families both emotionally and financially. It also puts caregivers in harm’s way, while insulating healthcare companies from expensive patient treatment and care. If healthcare companies tackle the full brunt of the Alzheimer’s epidemic, it will bankrupt them within the next five years. They will continue outrunning claims as long as possible.

Since doctors are essentially guessing on each victim, Alzheimer’s diagnoses are wrong at least 20 percent of the time. Those cases typically are further up the prion-disease spectrum under the term Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). CJD is a more severe and extremely contagious mutation of prion disease.

Unfortunately for caregivers and family members, the protocol for patient care and caregiver safety is vastly different for Alzheimer’s patients versus CJD patients. This mismanagement puts many stakeholders at risk.

It’s reckless to try to distinguish between prion diseases on the spectrum. The medical community should treat people with Alzheimer’s disease as though they have CJD—as though they are highly contagious. Family members and other caregivers should be warned accordingly. Caregivers of those with dementia are six times more likely to contract prion disease than someone who is not a caregiver. Thanks to misinformation, community members also are being exposed to victims unknowingly.

biosolids management land application

Pissing In The Pool

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to the prion disease epidemic, many pathways are being mismanaged, including sewage, biosolids and reclaimed wastewater. As stated earlier, blood, saliva, mucus, urine, feces, milk and cell tissue all carry infectious prions. These human discharges are flushed down toilets and sinks billions of times every day. We all have flushed away toxic or infectious waste that we would never throw on our garden or in our water well. The magic wand at the sewage treatment plant doesn’t phase most elements. It obviously doesn’t phase flesh-eating bacteria, either.

Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions in municipal waste streams. Despite this slightly important technical detail, we are dumping tons of infectious sewage on crops, gardens, pastures, golf courses, playgrounds and open spaces in our forests every day. Wind, rain and other natural dynamics put the sewage right back into our air, food and water supplies.

Spreading sewage sludge, biosolids, and reclaimed wastewater anywhere is a risk. Dumping them directly into our food and water is reckless, incompetent and criminal. We’re dumping prions into our lifecycle by the trainloads daily. Every nation is guilty.

To be precise, people with Alzheimer’s or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have used every sewage system in the world for years, which means that these systems all are hopelessly contaminated with prions. The problem intensifies with the addition of new prions and the exponential growth of existing ones in the system. Sewage from hospitals, nursing homes, slaughterhouses, morgues, mortuaries, veterinarians and other high-risk places enters the same sewage system.

The condensed sludge from all of these places is then dumped on our farms and ranches by the truckload. Plastic packaging and other large items are often visible in this waste, which means that treatment is extremely minimal. If the Pope waved his hand over the sewage, it would likely receive better treatment than what we see today. Nothing stops a prion, but you would hope that billions of dollars of wastewater treatment would at least take out pill bottles, syringes, needles and used prophylactics.

Thanks to more and more people dying from TSEs, sewage systems are more contaminated with prions than ever. Wastewater treatment systems are now prion incubators and distributors. Sewage sludge, wastewater reuse, biosolids and other sewage byproducts are biohazards causing bioterror. Thanks to questionable policymakers and profiteers, you are eating and drinking from your neighbor’s toilet–and the toilets at the local nursing home and hospital. We might as well dump sewage out of windows again.

biosolids land application LASS

Pandora’s Lunchbox

Thanks to more and more sewage mismanagement, we’re dumping more deadly prions on farms and ranches than ever. The wastewater industry and their consultants have convinced agricultural operations around the world that sewage and biosolids are safe, effective and profitable for all involved.

As it turns out, today’s sewage isn’t safe. It isn’t an effective fertilizer. The business is profitable for everyone concerned—until the sickness and disease sets in for the farmers, workers and the consumers. Until the land is condemned for being hopelessly contaminated—making everyone downstream sick.

Exposing crops and livestock to prions is a very bad idea. Plants absorb prions from the soil along with water and nutrient uptake, which makes the prions bioavailable and infectious to humans, wildlife and livestock via another pathway. We might as well inject prions into our veins.

In addition to uptake from the soil and water, plants also are contaminated through contact with biosolids. Rain can splash the death dust up on stalks and leaves, which contaminates them from the outside. People, livestock and wildlife are exposed to neurological disease just by consuming food grown in sewage sludge. The more consumed, the greater the risk. Utensils used in the harvesting, processing, cooking and eating of these crops also are permanently contaminated.

Meat and milk from livestock raised on pastures treated with sewage sludge are at risk of carrying prions. Livestock that graze on these dumping grounds can pull prions up directly from the soil as part of their daily grazing. Grains and grasses grown in sewage sludge and fed to livestock are a risk. Such exposure can turn these animals into incubators and distributors of prions.

People and predators that consume infected animals are at risk. Prions mutate and become more resistant and deadly as they move up the food chain through consumption. Prions from people are the most deadly and the most difficult to stop.

Prions are not the only ingredient in sewage that threatens food and water safety. Heavy metals, endocrine disruptors, carcinogens, flesh-eating bacteria and other contaminants await innocent bystanders.

Once sewage is dumped on crops and grazing land, the damage isn’t done. Rain, irrigation and wind proceed to spread the prions and other contaminants throughout our communities, watersheds and into our oceans. Dumping tons of sewage from millions of people on farms and ranches spreads the prion pathogen far and wide. It’s a vicious case of Pandora’s lunchbox. We can avoid some of the prion risk by eating foods that are organic. Fruits and vegetables grown in sewage sludge cannot be legally labeled as certified organic.

sewage treatment plant and disease

Profits, Prions and Peons

Thanks to prions, sewage management has become more of a nightmare than ever. Getting it out of our food and water will not be easy. Europe alone spends more than 2.2 billion euros every year to get sewage sludge out of the cities. Unfortunately, about 60 percent of the crap is dumped on agriculture and landscaping around homes and offices. Disposing of it safely would cost billions more.

Finland and Sweden are top offenders in Europe regarding sewage dumped inappropriately. People there live and play near the Baltic Sea, which is one of the most polluted bodies of water on the planet. Sewage mismanagement generates most of that pollution. Sewage is polluting food and water supplies. As a result, Finland has the highest rate of Alzheimer’s deaths in the world. Sweden is third.

The United States produces more than eight million tons of dried sewage sludge every year. About half of it is dumped on crops, yards, parks, golf courses and beyond. The U.S. also has the fourth-highest death rate from Alzheimer’s disease in the world. Alzheimer’s rates in Washington State are off the charts. Like Finland, it has a long history of sewage mismanagement. It dumps sewage on crops, near rivers and upstream in forests. It drains back into the rivers, lakes, coves and bays where so many people live, play, eat and drink. Public servants are making questionable decisions regarding public health on many levels. Innocent people and animals are paying the price.

Wisconsin is another interesting case history. Almost every county in Wisconsin has helped dispose of sewage sludge. Now, the state’s deer herd is being decimated by chronic wasting disease–a prion disease. The epidemic is being mismanaged on many levels. Prion-laced sewage and sick deer pose a serious threat to Wisconsin’s multi-billion dollar dairy herd. Of course, people are exposed, too.

California produces a significant amount of the U.S. food supply. Los Angeles, for example, ships a huge amount of its sewage sludge where crops abound. Arizona also is a favorite dumping ground for California’s largest cities. Cropland near Yuma is a favorite target. Open space in the Phoenix metro area also has been targeted with California’s latest export.

Valley Fever

Thanks to sewage from California, Arizona also has one of the highest rates of Alzheimer’s disease in the U.S. Windstorms in the desert carry much more than sand and dust. Sewage sludge particles are part of every dust cloud that sweeps over Phoenix, Tucson and beyond. Then homeowners and their landscapers take turns blowing it back and forth across the street with dust blowers. As a result, the region is plagued by a mystery respiratory illness called valley fever. It’s wicked. The virus never leaves your body.

In India, 80 percent of surface water is contaminated and 80 percent of that contamination is sewage. Broken water pipes and flooding allow fecal sludge to mix with potable water. The effects of this contamination are immediately felt with the onset of the monsoons. When rains break out, so do reports of water-borne diseases like diarrhea and cholera.

India’s Central Pollution Control Board estimates that major cities and towns generate more than 38 billion liters of sewage every day, of which only 30 percent is collected and channeled away. Less than 20 percent of this sewage is treated due to limited capacity. The rest is emptied into streets, rivers, lakes and the ocean. Ironically, Hinduism is the religion of water.

These are just a few examples of sewage mismanagement and the threat to man and beast. It’s happening somewhere near you. Sewage mismanagement in agriculture is a direct assault on the landowners, investors, workers, livestock, neighbors downstream and downwind and consumers. Crops, poultry, dairy, meat and water all are vulnerable to the prion threat.

wildlife disease

Canaries In A Coal Mine

Despite the unstoppable risk that sewage and prions represent to agriculture, testing for mad cow disease is very weak in most countries. In fact, the USDA reduced BSE testing in 2003 after finding the third mad cow. Out of about 35 million animals slaughtered annually, only 35,000 are tested for the deadly disease. Despite reduced testing, 22 cases have been confirmed in the U.S., so far. Another 20 cases have been confirmed in Canada. Japan, by contrast, tests every cow killed for consumption. Mad cow disease is not an isolated event. It’s impossible to contain. It’s just the tip of an iceberg.

The prion risk in dairy cattle is another issue. Most, if not all cases of mad cow disease in the U.S. and other countries have been dairy cattle, so such research seems logical. Beef cattle rarely live long enough to exhibit symptoms of mad cow disease. Dairy cattle often live much longer, which increases their exposure to prions and it gives them more time to become visibly sick. It also gives them more time and opportunity to contribute milk to the food supply.

Prions have been found in the milk of mammals, but no one has been allowed to test for prions in the milk of cattle. Given the enormous influence of the dairy industry, research on dairy milk, cheese and prions will probably never happen. Prion behavior observed in other species confirms the risk.

At the beginning of 1985, the world had never heard of mad cow disease. Public concern quickly gained momentum once the epidemic was exposed. At first, the U.K. government and industry insiders tried to cover up the threat. Politicians and regulators were more than willing to cast fate to the wind regarding public health.

mad cow disease and prions

The U.K. killed almost 200,000 cattle in an attempt to eradicate the disease. Thousands of carcasses were burned and others were buried in pits. Unfortunately, it’s impossible to eradicate prion disease because of the perpetual environmental pathways. Cases continue to arise, but testing has been rendered ineffective at best. Ireland just confirmed a new case of the disease in June 2015. Ireland was ground zero during the first mad cow crisis 30 years ago.

In the past, most infected cattle got the disease from eating feed made from the ground up blood, fat and bones of dead cattle. Once they fed a mad cow back to these vegetarian herds, the contagion spread like wildfire. Diet is a proven source of exposure to prion disease. Food and water contaminated by sewage may have contributed to that initial outbreak in 1985.

Unfortunately, no one knows exactly how many infected cattle were slaughtered and consumed by innocent families. That’s one of the weaknesses of the global food production systems. That’s one of the reasons that it’s vital to keep prions out of agriculture.

Scientific Research Ignored

Studies confirm that people and animals dying of prion disease contaminate the environment around them with prions. Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues recently found human prions in urine. Soto also confirmed that plants uptake prions and are infectious and deadly to those who consume such plants. Therefore, humans, wildlife and livestock are vulnerable to prion disease via plants grown on land treated with sewage sludge and reclaimed sewage water.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

Over the past 30 years, there has been a great deal of research to better understand the fate of toxins and pathogens in biosolids when applied to crops and grazing land. Much of that research is taking place today in an open laboratory, on innocent citizens in thousands of communities around the world. Unfortunately, they aren’t willing participants.

Read The Rest Of The Story At: http://crossbowcommunications.com/sewage-mismanagement-killing-millions-of-people-annually/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the prion disease epidemic is one of our special areas of practice. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Beached Whales An Indicator Of Neurological Disease On Land

Whales Contracting Neurological Disease From Human Sewage

Sick animals and sick people can tell us a lot about the health of our environment. A study in Denmark is raising red flags. There could be a common thread between sick whales and sick humans upstream.

whale beached caused by prion disease

Whales have too much intellectual, social and navigational capacity to run aground en masse unless extremely sick and disoriented. There have been several high-profile stranding events around the world in the past few years alone. An alarming number of whales are washing up on Alaska’s shores now. As mammals high on the food chain, their health is a good indictor of environmental health. We should be testing those that die much more rigorously for toxic buildup and disease. Whales are downstream from billions of people, so they are in a position to serve as unique bio-indicators.

These beached whales and dolphins are the oceans’ version of canaries in coal mines. Their bodies are like giant sponges that can offer insight into the health of the ocean and the planet.

For example, sick and dead whales might be able to shed light on the Alzheimer’s disease epidemic that is exploding exponentially around the globe. Thanks to reckless sewage disposal practices around the world, unstoppable prions are being dumped in our watersheds and waterways on an industrial scale. If the prion pathogen associated with Alzheimer’s and many related neurodegenerative diseases is present in whales and dolphins, it’s further confirmation of the scope and spread of these killer proteins. Unfortunately, that critical test is not taking place on the whales and dolphins now. Therefore, people continue to serve as the canary in the coal mine.

land application sewage sludge

As with humans and other mammals, whales and dolphins are vulnerable to prion disease. Prion disease has many names, including Alzheimer’s disease,  Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Parkinson’s disease. In livestock, it’s known as mad cow disease. In deer, it’s being called chronic wasting disease. They all are forms of what is called transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). TSEs are deadly and unstoppable. The prion pathogen behind them and the diseases themselves are being mismanaged globally. Our oceans are the holding pond for those that runoff the land with water.

At least one dolphin has been found with prion disease, but testing is severely lacking. Since dietary factors are clearly linked to neurological disease, we can learn more about the health of whales by studying the people who eat them. In turn, the health of the whales can shed light on the health of our food and water supplies upstream. A pioneering researcher is conducting such research now to better understand human health, the health of our oceans and the connections between those factors.

Whale meat appears to be contributing to high rates of neurological disease in Nordic and Baltic nations. Pioneering research found that Parkinson’s patients on the Faroe Islands have consumed about six times more whale meat and blubber than their neighbors who don’t have the disease.

Maria Skaalum Petersen Parkinson's disease and whale meat
Maria Skaalum Petersen has hit the tip of an iceberg.

Maria Skaalum Petersen is working to shed light on the connection between sick seas, sick whales and the people who consume them. Petersen is a researcher in the Department of Occupational and Public Health in the Faroe Islands health service. One of her projects has included a comparison of the prevalence of Parkinson’s disease (part of the TSE spectrum) in the Nordic countries.

She found that Parkinson’s disease is twice as prevalent on the Faroe Islands as in Norway and other Nordic countries. A traditional diet on the Faroe Islands typically includes pilot whale meat.

Predators, including some whales, are high on the food chain. Predators that consume predators are consuming the toxic build-up from every animal ever consumed. Therefore, predators (and the people who consume them) often serve as an excellent indicator of the health of an entire ecosystem, including prion contamination.

Not all whales are created equal, though. The whale meat sold in Norway and Iceland is mostly from minke whales, a species that has a diet much lower in the food chain. This means they do not accumulate as many contaminants or prions as pilot whales. This means that the risks associated with whale meat is slightly less for the people in Norway. Norway still has a fairly high rate of neurological disease.

eating pilot whales causes Parkinson's disease

“The Faroe Islanders eat pilot whales, while Norwegians eat baleen whales. Pilot whales have teeth and primarily eat fish and squid, which puts them higher on the food chain,” Petersen says.

Baleen whales feed by filtering zooplankton and krill into their mouths as they swim. In essence, they are vegetarians. Eating lower on the food chain lowers their prion exposure, but it doesn’t make them immune to the prion problem.

This study indicates that there is prion accumulation in whales–some more than others. It indicates that prions are in our oceans and onward upstream. It indicates that prions are in our food and water supplies and reckless sewage management is contributing to the problem. It reminds us of the hazards associated with wastewater reuse, sewage sludge disposal and biosolids in our communities and watersheds and the oceans below.

biosolids management land application

What can we learn from the Faroe Islands and whale meat? Prions are building up in the environment and in mammals now.This is a battle of pathway management. Time to manage the contamination is running out. Sewage mismanagement, including agricultural and industrial waste, is contributing to the problem.

If whales could talk, they would tell us to get our sh*t together and put it in a much safer place. Presently, we are recycling sewage sludge, biosolids and reclaimed wastewater throughout our watersheds. We are contaminating food and water supplies. We are pissing in the pool. We’re being fed lies and prions. Save the world. Save the whales. Save yourself.

Read more about the Alzheimer’s disease epidemic in Nordic and Baltic states, including Iceland, Finland, Sweden and Norway http://alzheimerdisease.tv/alzheimers-disease-finland-sweden/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the prion disease epidemic is one of our special areas of practice. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Biosolids Causing Chronic Wasting Disease

CWD Spreading Through Sewage Sludge

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is ravaging wildlife in many regions across North America. It’s part of a larger epidemic of neurological disease that is killing millions of people, wildlife and livestock around the world. Once again, wildlife are serving as the proverbial canary in a coal mine.

CWD is part of an incurable spectrum disease called transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” Mismanagement of pathogens associated with the disease are contributing to a broader epidemic of neurological disease among wildlife, livestock and people.

chronic wasting disease

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). As such, TSEs also are referred to as prion disease. The critical factor is that prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces carry deadly prions from victims. All tissue is infectious just because of the contact with the contaminated blood.

TSEs also include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in the deer family. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

prion disease epidemic

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to CWD and the prion disease epidemic, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Thanks to infectious sewage, biosolids, reclaimed sewage water and feedlot waste, we’re recycling the prion pathogen that causes neurological disease right back into our watersheds, which we share with deer, elk, moose, livestock and other creatures that are vulnerable to prion disease. Rain, wind and irrigation spread deadly prions further everyday. Healthy wildlife are being exposed to deadly prions through food, water, air and contact with infected animals.

 

Since prions are in the bodily fluids of its victims, sewage mismanagement is a top concern. Wastewater treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA. Therefore, putting biosolids on crops and dumping sewage sludge throughout our watersheds is a very bad idea. Dumping sewage from billions of people on land and at sea creates deadly prion freeways.

Every sewage system in the world has been used by a person, if not millions of people, with Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Sewage systems have become prion incubators. Biosolids, wastewater reuse and sludge disposal have made them potent prion distributors. The waste from feedlots is likely contributing to the problem as well.

land application sewage sludge

Although there are multiple causes of prion disease, including CWD, reckless policies are contributing to an environmental nightmare. Sick deer, elk, moose and other wildlife and marine life are just a symptom of a much bigger problem. Putting these pandora-like pathogens back in the box is impossible.

Unfortunately, misinformation distributed by government agencies about the risks associated with chronic wasting disease are reckless, incompetent and criminally negligent at best. Claiming that there is no known risk associated with handling or consuming wildlife with CWD is laughable. Just look at the guidance issued regarding mad cow disease. Just look at the guidance issued to people with the most severe form of the disease–Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

The bodies of victims, regardless of species, are highly toxic and contagious. Hunting knives and saws used on sick wildlife are infected forever. Processing plants that cut and grind wildlife carcasses for hunters (before CWD tests are complete) are contaminated forever. Every animal processed after an infected carcass will become infected. Pickups and trailers that transport infected animals are hopelessly contaminated. The prion pathways created by one hunting trip can explode exponentially within hours.

wildlife disease

Hunters should just walk away from a carcass that looks suspicious and one should treat all game that looks healthy as suspicious, until proven otherwise. Hunters that kill and dress deer with CWD expose themselves and their families to prion disease in many ways thanks to misinformation from state and federal regulators.

It’s impossible to neutralize or stop prions in even the most sterile environments, including hospitals. It’s ludicrous to think that treated sewage water or biosolids are prion-free. Especially since prions from people are much more infectious than those found in other species (prions become more aggressive as they work their way up the food chain). It’s also ludicrous to think that game processing plants are prion-free. Regulations in this arena are criminal. Thousands, possibly millions, of innocent people have been exposed to the prions from someone else’s deer. That’s because many are processed before testing or no testing is done at all.

biosolids land application and disease

According to the U.S. EPA, “Prions are extremely resistant to inactivation by ultraviolet light, irradiation, boiling, dry heat, formaline, freezing, drying and changes in pH. Methods for inactivating prions in infected tissues or wastes include incineration at very high temperatures and alkaline hydrolysis.”

This applies to both the sewage plants that are contaminating our favorite hunting grounds it also has to do with game processing plants. It’s impossible to sterilize either once infected with prions.

The EPA National Water Research Compendium 2009-2014 lists prions eight times as an emerging contaminant of concern in sewage sludge (biosolids), water and manure. The EPA issued what it calls the “Sludge Rule,” which basically disclaims any responsibility for its risk assessments regarding biosolids. The EPA reserves the right to adjust these risk assessments, however, as the test of time disproves its pseudo-science.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infective in certain soils. Pedersen’s research also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage and its byproducts are dumped.

sewage treatment plant and disease

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.” (Now, we know that plants uptake prions, too.)

sewage treatment plant and disease

Read More at http://crossbowcommunications.com/sewage-mismanagement-killing-millions-of-people-annually/

public relations firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the prion disease epidemic is one of our special areas of practice. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Alzheimer’s Disease Caused By Food, Water Contamination

Sewage Sludge Spreading Infectious Waste

More than 50 million people around the world have Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. It’s the fastest-growing cause of death in the world.

Alzheimer’s disease is a member of an unstoppable family of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” Related diseases are killing wildlife and livestock around the world. The TSE epidemic represents an environmental nightmare that threatens every mammal on Earth.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

In order to understand the threat, one must understand the dynamics of this neurological disease. Alzheimer’s disease, for example, is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). As such, TSEs also are referred to as prion disease. The critical factor is that prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces carry deadly prions from victims. All tissue is infectious just because of the contact with the contaminated blood. All sewage is infectious.

TSEs also include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in the deer family. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

prion disease epidemic

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to the prion disease epidemic, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. As such, we are recycling the pathogen that causes Alzheimer’s right back into our food and water. We’re dumping these killer proteins on crops, parks, golf courses, ski areas and school grounds. Rain and irrigation spread them throughout our communities and watersheds. We’re dumping prions into our food and water supplies with foolish sewage management practices.

Prions Found In All Bodily Fluids

A new study confirms that people and animals dying of prion disease are contaminating the environment around them with a deadly and unstoppable protein found in their bodily fluids. Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology and director of the George and Cynthia W. Mitchell Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Brain Related Illnesses at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues recently found prions in urine. The study was published in the August 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The research offers hope for earlier diagnosis among the millions of people impacted around the world, which means earlier intervention and better disease management. It also can help develop screens to protect our blood supplies from donors with prion disease.

The bad news is that prions in urine, mucus, feces and blood underscores the environmental nightmare associated with Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD), Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and prion diseases among livestock and wildlife. Although there are many causes for prion disease, many people and animals are contracting it from environmental exposure (food, water and soil) and then contaminating the environment even more with their own bodily fluids. Once victims die, carcasses also contaminate soil and water.

“This is the first time that prions have been detected in human urine,” Dr. Soto told Neurology Today.

prions in sewage and urine

Soto failed to reference urine and blood studies performed earlier by Ruth Gabizon in 2001 and Reichl in 2002. These studies also detected prions in bodily fluids. Despite that detail, Soto’s findings can help focus global attention on the exploding prion problem.

Additional research has determined that the prion pathogen spreads through feces, saliva, blood, milk, soil, water and the tissue of infected animals and humans. If a single person with prion disease discharges bodily fluids or feces into a public sewer system, that sewage system is permanently infected and the amount of contamination will multiply and intensify daily. Everything discharged from that sewage system—reclaimed water and biosolids—can spread the contamination even further.

land application sewage sludge

Once a prion reaches the soil, that soil is permanently contaminated and the entire watershed (water) below that point is at risk forever. If your food and water is generated in that watershed, you have a higher risk of contracting prion disease with every sip of water or every bite of food produced locally.

With the help of weather, prions can migrate through wind and water. Rain and snow can rinse them into surface water, groundwater, streams, ponds, lakes, and oceans. Wildlife, livestock and humans can ingest prions from soil, water and food. We can’t afford to take the risk of further contaminating entire watersheds – increasing the pathway to humans, livestock, and wildlife downstream.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Because of these factors and others, we have an epidemic of prion disease exploding around the world right now. The epidemic is worse in some regions of the world than others. For example, the death rate for Alzheimer’s disease is higher in Finland than any other country in the world. Iceland and the United States are runners up. In fact, the death rate for Alzheimer’s is higher in Washington state than any other known region in the world. These vast discrepancies can only be explained by environmental factors, including food, water and air pathways. Sewage disposal that contaminates local food and water supplies is likely part of the problem.

The urine and sewage connection helps explain why the global epidemic is exploding. More than 44 million people around the world are known to have these neurodegenerative diseases today. Millions more have the disease, but don’t know it, yet. In addition to these people, millions of infected people around the world have used our sewage systems over the past century. Millions more are using them today. It’s impossible to neutralize or stop prions in even the most sterile environments, including hospitals. It’s ludicrous to think that treated sewage water or biosolids are prion-free. Especially since prions from people are much more infectious than those found in other species (prions become more aggressive as they work their way up the food chain).

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that prions are in sewage and that there has been no way to detect them or stop them. As such, the EPA has never issued guidance on prion management within sewage processing plants. This lack of directive allows budget-strapped states and counties to regulate the practices in a variety of ways that best suit local municipalities and industries.

Dr. Soto’s test changes that equation. Now, the EPA can’t plead ignorance to the dangers of prions in biosolids and reclaimed sewage water. Sewage dumped at sea must be reconsidered. Prions should be classified as a select agent again by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Center for Disease Control. Similar measures should be enacted around the world immediately. Failure to act responsibly is suicide.

Read The Full Story About What Is Causing The Alzheimer’s Disease epidemic at http://alzheimerdisease.tv/alzheimers-disease-spreading-faster-via-biosolids-reclaimed-water/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Wastewater Reclamation Recycles Alzheimer’s Disease

Risk Assessment Overlooks Prion Pathogen

San Diego City Council approved plans to reuse sewage water as drinking water. The latest toilet-to-tap water project is a possible death sentence for millions of people who will drink the water and contaminate their homes, gardens and offices with a highly contagious pathogen called a prion. The deadly form of protein can cause neurological disorders in mammals, including Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

A coalition of community leaders, business groups and environmental organizations sold the plan to citizens with smoke and mirrors. Environmental groups said that the Pure Water project will mean less sewage dumped into the ocean and less reliance on desalination of that same ocean water. They didn’t explain that citizens would have to drink infected water to realize those benefits.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

The city recruited some environmental groups to serve as poster children for the project, to help neutralize resistance from more critical environmental and health advocates. Thanks to the slick campaign, taxpayers coughed up $3.2 billion for the right to choke down their own sewage–an idea that does sound sensible on the surface (keep reading).

The Problem With Prions and Prion Disease

If not for one tiny detail, I would be more open-minded and supportive of the practice of recycling wastewater. That microscopic detail is called a prion—the deadly and unstoppable protein behind the exploding Alzheimer’s epidemic, mad cow disease and other neurological disorders that are killing millions of people, wildlife and livestock around the world.

A new study confirms that people and animals dying of prion disease are contaminating the environment around them with a deadly and unstoppable protein found in their bodily fluids. Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology and director of the George and Cynthia W. Mitchell Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Brain Related Illnesses at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues recently found prions in urine. The study has been published in the August 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The good news is that the research offers hope for earlier diagnosis among the millions of people impacted around the world. The discovery can promote earlier intervention and better disease management. It also can help develop screens to protect our blood supplies from donors with prion disease.

sewage treatment plant and disease

Wastewater Recycling Hazardous

Backers of water recycling projects call the issue no-brainers. They’re right. Victims of prion disease die slowly as their brains collapse.

The bad news is that prions in urine underscore the environmental nightmare associated with Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD), Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and prion diseases among livestock and wildlife. Although there are many causes for prion disease, many people and animals are contracting it from environmental exposure (food, water and soil) and then contaminating the environment even more with their own bodily fluids. Once victims die, carcasses also contaminate soil and water.

“This is the first time that prions have been detected in human urine,” Dr. Soto told Neurology Today.

Soto failed to reference urine and blood studies performed earlier by Ruth Gabizon in 2001 and Reichl in 2002. These studies also detected prions in bodily fluids. Despite that detail, Soto’s findings can help focus global attention on the exploding prion problem.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for identifying, naming and studying deadly prions. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research.

prion disease epidemic

In June 2012, Prusiner confirmed that Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and even ALS are prion diseases similar, if not identical, to CJD in people, mad cow disease in livestock and chronic wasting disease in wildlife. The variations in disease progression could be due to genetics in the patients or mutations in the prion, not different diseases entirely.

Additional research has determined that the prion pathogen spreads through feces, saliva, blood, milk, soil, water and the tissue of infected animals and humans. If a single person with prion disease discharges bodily fluids or feces into a public sewer system, that sewage system is permanently infected and the amount of contamination will multiply and intensify daily. Everything discharged from that sewage system—reclaimed water and biosolids—can spread the contamination even further.

Once a prion reaches the soil, that soil is permanently contaminated and the entire watershed below that point is at risk forever. If your food and water is generated in that watershed, you have a higher risk of contracting prion disease.

land application sewage sludge

With the help of weather, prions can migrate through wind and water. Rain and snow can rinse them into surface water, groundwater, streams, ponds, lakes, and oceans. Wildlife, livestock and humans can ingest prions from soil, water and food. We can’t afford to take the risk of further contaminating entire watersheds – increasing the pathway to humans, livestock, and wildlife downstream.

Because of these factors and others, we have an epidemic of prion disease around the world right now. The epidemic is worse in some regions of the world than others. For example, the death rate for Alzheimer’s is higher in Finland than any other country in the world. Iceland and the United States are runners up. In fact, the death rate for Alzheimer’s is higher in Washington state than any other known region in the world. These vast discrepancies can only be explained by environmental factors, including food, water and air pathways. Sewage disposal that contaminates local food and water supplies is likely part of the problem.

The scientific name for prion disease is Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s, mad cow, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), chronic wasting, Huntington’s, scrapie and possibly Parkinson’s. This transmissible family of disease is unstoppable for many reasons. In addition, once items are exposed to victims of prion disease, they can never be sterilized again.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine.

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

biosolids land application and disease

The urine and sewage connection helps explain why the global epidemic is exploding. More than 50 million people around the world are known to have these neurodegenerative diseases today. Millions more have the disease, but don’t know it, yet. In addition to these people, millions of infected people around the world have used our sewage systems over the past century. Millions more are using them today. It’s impossible to neutralize or stop prions in even the most sterile environments, including hospitals. It’s ludicrous to think that treated sewage water or biosolids are prion-free. Especially since prions from people are much more infectious than those found in other species (prions become more aggressive as they work their way up the food chain).

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that prions are in sewage and that there has been no way to detect them or stop them. As such, the EPA has never issued guidance on prion management within sewage processing plants. This lack of directive allows budget-strapped states and counties to regulate the practices in a variety of ways that best suit local municipalities and industries.

Dr. Soto’s test changes that equation. Now, the EPA can’t plead ignorance to the dangers of prions in biosolids and reclaimed sewage water. Sewage dumped at sea must be reconsidered. Prions should be classified as a select agent again by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Center for Disease Control. Similar measures should be enacted around the world immediately. Failure to act responsibly is suicide.

Unfortunately, testing will confirm that every sewage system in the world has served people with Alzheimer’s disease and CJD. As such, prions have been incubating, multiplying and migrating out of these systems for many years. The problem is intensifying within and beyond these sewage systems every day.

biosolids land application LASS

According to the U.S. EPA, “Prions are extremely resistant to inactivation by ultraviolet light, irradiation, boiling, dry heat, formaline, freezing, drying and changes in pH. Methods for inactivating prions in infected tissues or wastes include incineration at very high temperatures and alkaline hydrolysis.” They didn’t mention hydrogen peroxide.

“Since it’s unlikely that the sewage treatment or pellet production processes can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” said the Toronto Department of Health, November 2004.

The EPA National Water Research Compendium 2009-2014 lists prions eight times as an emerging contaminant of concern in sewage sludge (biosolids), water and manure.

The Sludge Rule Overrules The Golden Rule

The EPA issued what it calls the “Sludge Rule,” which basically disclaims any responsibility for its questionable risk assessments regarding biosolids. The EPA reserves the right to adjust these risk assessments, however, as the test of time disproves its pseudo-science.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infective in certain soils. Pedersen’s research also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

Meanwhile, we’re spreading tons of biosolids (sewage sludge) on farmland every day to produce our food. Organic food operations, including fruits, vegetables, meat and dairy are not immune to prion exposure.

We’re dumping biosolids on parks and golf courses and our backyards where we live and play. Coastal cities and ocean vessels dump their sewage right into the ocean, where prions can enter the food chain again, while washing back on our favorite beaches.

We’re dumping millions of tons of contaminated sewage into the oceans, rivers and on cropland around the world every day. We’re spraying reclaimed wastewater on our parks, golf courses and crops. In some cases, people are drinking reclaimed wastewater that has been recycled to their taps. Municipalities, water companies and sewage districts face new liabilities as never seen before.

The new urine study primarily references what is called variant CJD (vCJD is the supposed strain of prion that causes mad cow disease). I argue that a deadly prion is a deadly prion and all prion diseases should be managed assuming that prions are in the urine of all victims. There is no species barrier. There is no cure. There is no reason to assume that prion diseases referred to as Alzheimer’s, CJD, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and others are different from each other.

Based on this premise, caregivers and family members must arm themselves with facts that can save their lives. Simple acts can expose family and caregivers to the prion contagion. For example, many household items, including utensils and dishes that belong to people who have Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s are likely infected from saliva. It’s unsafe for others to use these items and people should not donate them to charity.

Despite the mass confusion and concern regarding prion disease, protective and sterilization protocols for Alzheimer’s and CJD are not the same and millions of people are being exposed to prion disease because of false securities. CJD is just the tip of a deadly, incurable iceberg and we all should sit up and pay attention right now. We’re recklessly allowing caregivers and stakeholders to expose themselves and others to the problem.

Although there are multiple causes of, and pathways for, prion disease, reckless policies around the world are contributing to the unstoppable epidemic. It’s spreading further every day. Stakeholders must arm themselves with facts that can promote reform because all infected mammals shed infectious prions in their blood, saliva, mucus, urine and feces. Prions also have been found in milk. In essence, the entire body of a victim is contaminated and must be managed accordingly.

With these risks in mind, we need many reforms to safeguard human health and environmental pathways. We are experts on the issue of prion disease and pathway management. Please join us in the pursuit of truth and reform.

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These deadly diseases are known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins. Victims permanently contaminate the world around them with their bodily fluids. Once contaminated with prions, items cannot be sterilized.

Source: http://crossbowcommunications.com/san-diego-should-reconsider-plan-to-drink-recycled-wastewater/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Sewage Sludge, Reclaimed Wastewater Spreading Alzheimer’s Disease

Biosolids, Reclaimed Wastewater Spreading Deadly Disease

A new study confirms that people and animals dying of prion disease are contaminating the environment around them with a deadly and unstoppable protein found in their bodily fluids, including their urine and feces. Wastewater treatment plants can’t neutralize the deadly form of protein known as a prion.

Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology and director of the George and Cynthia W. Mitchell Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Brain Related Illnesses at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues recently found deadly and infectious prions in urine. The study has been published in the August 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Unfortunately, other researchers have found prions in all bodily fluids of victims, which is extremely bad news for caregivers, family members and others in the community who are caught in the crossfire.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

The good news is that the research offers hope for earlier diagnosis among the millions of people impacted around the world. The discovery can promote earlier intervention and better disease management. It also can help develop screens to protect our blood supplies from donors with prion disease.

The bad news is that prions in urine and feces underscore the environmental nightmare associated with Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD), Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and prion diseases among livestock and wildlife. Although there are many causes for prion disease, many people and animals are contracting it from environmental exposure (food, water and soil) and then contaminating the environment even more with their own bodily fluids. Once victims die, carcasses also contaminate soil and water.

Alzheimer's disease prevention

“This is the first time that prions have been detected in human urine,” Dr. Soto told Neurology Today.

Soto failed to reference urine and blood studies performed earlier by Ruth Gabizon in 2001 and Reichl in 2002. These studies also detected prions in bodily fluids. Despite that detail, Soto’s findings can help focus global attention on the exploding prion problem.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for identifying, naming and studying deadly prions. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research.

prion disease epidemic

In June 2012, Prusiner confirmed that Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and even ALS are prion diseases similar, if not identical, to CJD in people, mad cow disease in livestock and chronic wasting disease in wildlife. The variations in disease progression could be due to genetics in the patients or mutations in the prion, not different diseases entirely.

Additional research has determined that the prion pathogen spreads through feces, saliva, blood, milk, soil, water and the tissue of infected animals and humans. If a single person with prion disease discharges bodily fluids or feces into a public sewer system, that sewage system is permanently infected and the amount of contamination will multiply and intensify daily. Everything discharged from that sewage system—reclaimed water and biosolids—can spread the contamination even further.

Once a prion reaches the soil, that soil is permanently contaminated and the entire watershed below that point is at risk forever. If your food and water is generated in that watershed, you have a higher risk of contracting prion disease.

“There has been a resurgence of this sort of thinking, because there is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. 

land application sewage sludge

With the help of weather, prions can migrate through wind and water. Rain and snow can rinse them into surface water, groundwater, streams, ponds, lakes, and oceans. Wildlife, livestock and humans can ingest prions from soil, water and food. We can’t afford to take the risk of further contaminating entire watersheds – increasing the pathway to humans, livestock, and wildlife downstream.

Because of these factors and others, we have an epidemic of prion disease around the world right now. The epidemic is worse in some regions of the world than others. For example, the death rate for Alzheimer’s disease is higher in Finland than any other country in the world. Iceland and the United States are runners up. In fact, the death rate for Alzheimer’s is higher in Washington state than any other known region in the world. Norway has the highest death rate from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). These vast discrepancies can only be explained by environmental factors, including food, water and air pathways. Sewage disposal that contaminates local food and water supplies is likely part of the problem.

The scientific name for prion disease is Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, mad cow, CJD, chronic wasting, Huntington’s, scrapie and possibly Parkinson’s. This transmissible family of disease is unstoppable for many reasons. In addition, once items are exposed to victims of prion disease, they can never be sterilized again.

Prion News via http://crossbowcommunications.com/sewage-mismanagement-contributing-to-global-alzheimers-epidemic/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Chronic Wasting Disease Related To Alzheimer’s Disease

CWD Spread Through Sewage Sludge

A Colorado company says that hunters, landowners and many others are being misinformed about the dangers of chronic wasting disease. As such, public health and the health of entire water sheds are at risk.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is another form of prion disease. Prions also are behind the explosion in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). We also know prions because they are the causative agent behind mad cow disease. The scientific name for this family of neurodegenerative disorders is Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins.”

prion disease epidemic

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion (PREE-on) disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“The species barrier between these diseases is a myth,” said Gary Chandler, president of Crossbow Communications. “Prion disease is an environmental disease. It spreads in many ways and to stop it we need to reform many policies around the world.”

Although CWD spreads through many vectors, the greatest pathway is sewage sludge, also known as biosolids. The U.S. alone dumps more than 700 millions tons of this infectious waste on land–farms, ranches, forests, golf courses, parks and school grounds. Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. If they can’t stop prions in the friendly and sterile confines of an operating room, they can’t stop them in the wastewater treatment plant.

Deer, elk, moose and reindeer are now contracting prion disease from humans. To help cloak the epidemic, it’s called chronic wasting disease (CWD). Deer with CWD are proverbial canaries in a coal mine. They are being killed by government sharpshooters to help cover up the problem. It’s insane.

Chandler says that sewage disposal practices are contributing the the outbreak among wildlife. He says the same threat is viable for livestock. The practice of spreading sewage sludge (biosolids) on cropland and pastures makes prions available to grazing animals. It also puts prions in a position to contaminate water supplies when irrigation and rain rinse the biosolids into groundwater and surface water runoff. This water runs into creeks, ponds, streams, lakes, rivers, oceans and our drinking water. 

biosolids land application and disease

Reused wastewater for drinking is reckless. Prions are in the bodily fluids of its victims. Sewage plants can’t detect or stop prions.

The risk assessments prepared by the U.S. EPA for wastewater treatment and sewage sludge are flawed and current practices of recycling this infectious waste is fueling a public health disaster. Many risks are not addressed, including prions and radioactive waste. They don’t mention prions or radiation because there is no answer. Most nations are making the same mistake. We’re dumping killer proteins on crops, parks, golf courses, gardens, ski areas, school grounds and beyond. Wind, rain and irrigation spread these contaminants and many more throughout our communities and watersheds.

Failure to account for known risks is negligent. Crops for humans and livestock grown grown in sewage sludge absorb prions and become infectious. We’re all vulnerable to Alzheimer’s and other forms of prion disease right now due to widespread denial and mismanagement. It’s time to stop the land application of sewage sludge (LASS) in all nations. Safer alternatives exist.

Just ask the US EPA. Therefore, putting biosolids and recycling wastewater is more dangerous than injecting radiation into our watersheds. Radiation at least has a half life. With prions, it’s a question of how fast they double and triple their numbers. It’s safe to say that every sewage system in the world has been used by a person, if not millions, of people with Alzheimer’s and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

land application sewage sludge

Approximately 50 million people around the world already have Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. The threat is so severe that health officials expect the numbers of people living with the disease to triple soon. Unfortunately, neurodegenerative diseases among people of all ages are rising around the world. As these numbers rise, our sewage disposal will become more critical than ever because the further it spreads, the faster it will spread.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These deadly diseases are known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins. Victims permanently contaminate the world around them with their bodily fluids. Once contaminated with prions, items cannot be sterilized.

For more information, contact the experts at Crossbow. http://crossbowcommunications.com/public-affairs-firm-phoenix/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through its subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Wastewater Reclamation A Public Health Disaster

Editor’s Note: There was a time when I thought that recycling wastewater was a good idea. Unfortunately, I have learned how this practice is recycling deadly and unstoppable neurodegenerative diseases in people, wildlife and livestock. The practice permanently contaminates soil and water supplies–and entire watersheds. These risks and more are discussed in my new eBook, “Alzheimer’s: A Survivor’s Guide.” Please join me and advocate for the truth and meaningful reforms.

Wastewater Reuse Recycles Neurological Disease

Pastor Bob McCartney of First Baptist Church tries to love his neighbor as himself. He’s just not thrilled that Wichita Falls will soon have him drinking water that once swirled down his neighbor’s toilet. The Texas city of more than 104,000, suffering the worst drought on record, is about to become the first place in the U.S. to treat sewage and pump it directly back to residents.

Prions and Prusiner win Nobel Prize

People who live in Wichita Falls, northwest of Dallas on the Oklahoma border, say they’ll buy more bottled water and try not to think about what’s flowing through their pipes when they bathe, brush their teeth and make soup.

“The idea is a bit grotesque,” said McCartney, 48, who has led prayer vigils for rain. “I’m not crazy about it.”

Other U.S. localities are considering similar approaches as water becomes scarcer — the result of drought, growing populations and greater consumption. The crisis is worldwide. In California, food prices are being driven higher and from Brazil to southeast Asia a historic lack of rainfall is hobbling power and crop production. Wichita Falls, a sun-baked ranch town that hosts the Hotter’N Hell Hundred endurance bike ride each August, is awaiting final state approval to begin recycling 5 million gallons a day starting next month, said Teresa Rose, deputy public works director. That’s about a third of its usage.

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Rose says the water will be safe and that all traces of sewage will be removed.
Residents say they’re not convinced.

“When my son gets water out of the kitchen sink, I am going to chase him down and stop him from drinking it,” said Chira Traore, 32, as she sipped a bottle of Ozarka on a recent walk through Lucy Park, home of the falls on the Wichita River that lend the city its name.

Wichita Falls has been trying to sell the plan using videos and public meetings.
“You have people who say, ‘Ewww, I am drinking someone else’s toilet water,’” Rose said. “But when you think about it, everyone downstream is already drinking someone else’s toilet water.”

Some localities purify wastewater and send it into lakes and reservoirs. Those supplies may eventually be treated and used for drinking.

sewage treatment plant and disease

Wichita Falls is going further by planning to be the first U.S. locality to send the cleaned sewer water directly back to its treatment plant, said Zachary Dorsey, a spokesman for the WateReuse Association, an Alexandria, Virginia-based group whose members include utilities, government officials and researchers. Cities in Texas, California, Florida and North Carolina are also considering direct reuse, he said.

Raleigh, North Carolina, which reuses water indirectly, plans to push legislation this year to allow the direct method, said Tim Woody, its wastewater superintendent. Direct reuse “is still taboo,” said Woody. “It is a responsible way to address our water needs.”
Sewage increasingly will become a resource, said Calvin Finch, director of the Water Conservation and Technology Center in San Antonio.

“It’s not something that’s pleasant to think about,” Finch said. “You have to educate people to the idea.”

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These deadly diseases are known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins. Victims permanently contaminate the world around them with their bodily fluids. Once contaminated with prions, items cannot be sterilized.

For more information about prions in sewage and prion disease, please visit http://alzheimerdisease.tv/what-causes-alzheimers-disease/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Alzheimer’s Epidemic Spreading In All Countries

Caregivers At Risk Of Infection From Alzheimer’s Disease Patients 

Approximately 40 million people around the world already have Alzheimer’s disease and the numbers are rising rapidly. Since the disease barely existed a century ago, Alzheimer’s disease and several related diseases fit the definition of a global epidemic.

My new book explains why Alzheimer’s disease is contagious in many, if not all, cases. It explores why some regions of the world have death rates that are off the charts. It breaks down the causes and offers advice to protect you and your family.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

Alzheimer’s deaths in the U.S. alone increased 68 percent between 2000 and 2010. During that same time, deaths from other major diseases, including heart disease and cancer, decreased significantly. Most developed countries are making progress on all health fronts, except for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

This book explores Alzheimer’s disease as part of a protein epidemic. It makes several critical points and asks some challenging questions about a form of killer protein known as a “prion” (pronounced PREE-on).

Deadly prions are contagious and unstoppable. They are definitely behind some forms of neurodegenerative disorders in mammals, including humans. A Nobel-Prize-winning scientist claims that Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases all are prion diseases. In addition, prions are behind a deadly epidemic among deer, elk and moose in North America and South Korea called Chronic Wasting disease (CWD).

CWD, like Alzheimer’s, is a neurodegenerative disorder that consumes the brain. Thousands of animals have died and are still dying of the disease, while spreading the deadly infection before and after death.

In my opinion, since we have a global prion epidemic among people and regional ones among wildlife, it stands to reason that livestock also are impacted. Unfortunately, we don’t comprehensively test our food supply for prions, so we don’t know to what extent prion disease is, or isn’t, in global herds that supply meat, dairy, and other products. As we discuss later, these deadly proteins have likely made it into our water supplies, too. In some cases, we are even releasing them into the air.

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These deadly diseases are known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins. Victims permanently contaminate the world around them with their bodily fluids. Once contaminated with prions, items cannot be sterilized.

For more information or to buy the E-book, please visit http://alzheimerdisease.tv/alzheimers-disease-epidemic/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Canada Says Prion Disease Unstoppable

Editor’s Note: As we have suggested before on this blog, prion disease is impossible to stop. As a cluster of prion disease appeared last week in the human population near Vancouver, Canadian official’s today have announced that eradicating prion disease (chronic wasting disease or CWD) from the deer population will be impossible. Now, the goal is to control the spread in the wild deer, elk and moose populations. If only they would make such admissions on prion disease in people and livestock. (Known as Creutzfeldt-Jakobs and Alzheimer’s disease in people and Mad Cow disease and scrapie in livestock. All are caused by the same contagion–prions).

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Unfortunately, deadly prions are deadly prions regardless of the species victimized. Therefore, making different assumptions about the characteristics of prion disease in different host species is flawed. Claiming that there is not a common denominator in prion disease between species is reckless. In other words, if prion disease is unstoppable and incurable in wildlife, we can and should make the same assumptions regarding prion disease in people and livestock. The stakes are too high in this life-and-death race with a contagion that migrates, mutates and multiplies. 

Hunters should take note that it is not safe to even touch an animal that has Chronic Wasting disease. Deadly prions are known to be in blood, saliva, feces, urine and tissue of infected mammals. Your knife and saw will become infected and permanently contagious. Same goes for the butcher shop that processes one. If your game processor has ever processed a contaminated animal, the facility is exposing every carcass that follows it down the production line. Despite what officials say, it is impossible to sterilize these facilities.

land application sewage sludge

CWD A Lost Battle

Experts say it may not be possible to eliminate chronic wasting disease (a deadly and contagious prion disease) in deer and elk in Canada. The fatal infectious disease is so well established in Saskatchewan and Alberta that the federal government and some provinces are rethinking how to deal with what is commonly known as CWD.

In 2005, Ottawa announced a national strategy to control chronic wasting disease in the hope of finding ways to eradicate it. Now the emphasis is shifting to preventing CWD from spreading, especially in the wild.

“We have to realize that we may not be able to eradicate this disease currently from Canada, given that we don’t have any effective tools, so we may be looking at switching from eradication to control,” said Penny Greenwood, national manager of domestic disease control for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

biosolids management land application

The agency says it is working with the provinces and the game-ranching industry to come up with a better plan, perhaps by next spring.

“We feel that the current program that we have had in place for chronic wasting disease … is not effective in achieving its goals,” Greenwood said.

CWD is caused by abnormal proteins called prions and is similar to mad cow disease. There is no vaccine against it. Symptoms can take months or years to develop. They include weight loss, tremors, lack of coordination, paralysis and, ultimately, death.

Some scientists believe infected animals can pass the disease to other animals through saliva, blood, urine or droppings, or indirectly through prions in the environment. The prions can remain active in dirt for years. There is no evidence that the disease can affect people (there is no evidence that it can’t), but the food inspection agency recommends against eating meat from infected animals.

chronic wasting disease and moose

Prion Disease In Wildlife

The latest report from the CFIA shows the disease is active in herds of deer on Saskatchewan game farms. Scientists say the more pressing challenge is the growing number of infected wild deer and elk in Saskatchewan and Alberta. The disease has also been found in a moose. Researchers believe that in one area of Saskatchewan, up to 50 per cent of the deer have chronic wasting disease.

“This is a disease that is now established in wildlife, and when you have a disease that is established in a wildlife reservoir, it is always extremely difficult to eliminate it,” Greenwood said.

mad cow disease and prions

British Columbia and Manitoba have had no confirmed cases, but have put up billboards on highways warning hunters not to bring in deer or elk that have been shot in other jurisdictions. The caption on the signs that B.C. put up this spring in the Peace and Kootenay regions near the Alberta boundary read: “Stop Chronic Wasting Disease. Do Not Import Intact Deer Carcasses. Keep B.C. Wildlife Healthy.”

Scientists say a big challenge in tracking the spread of CWD is a lack of research into the disease and surveillance programs to track its spread. The federal government ended a program on March 31 that was established in 2005 called PrioNet Canada that was conducting research into CWD and mad cow disease.

Surveillance in the wild is difficult because there is no way to test live animals for the disease. Provincial governments rely on testing the heads of animals turned in by hunters. But in Saskatchewan and Alberta, the provinces where the disease is well-established, it is not mandatory for hunters to do that.

sewage treatment plant and disease

More needs to be done, said Trent Bollinger, a CWD expert with the Canadian Co-operative Wildlife Health Centre at the University of Saskatchewan.

“It is a long-term commitment to both research and management to see how to best approach this and those are difficult things for governments to buy into,” Bollinger said from Saskatoon.

Last year, the Manitoba government ordered conservation officers to kill as many as nine elk that escaped from a Saskatchewan game farm into the province. Bollinger predicted that with infected wild deer close to the provincial boundary, it is only a matter of time before wild animals with CWD wander into Manitoba.

Alberta is funding research into the disease through the Alberta Prion Research Institute.

Debbie McKenzie, a University of Alberta biologist, said there is concern that CWD could eventually infect other species, including caribou. She said researchers hope to develop a vaccine to stop the spread of the disease, but coming up with an effective way of vaccinating animals in the wild will pose another challenge.

“It is one thing for a farmer to vaccinate his cows. It is another thing to come up with cost-effective ways of vaccinating all of the deer and elk in an area.”

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/06/16/chronic-wasting-disease-spread-canada_n_3448947.html?ref=topbar&just_reloaded=1

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Badger Cull Or Mad Cow Disease

Badger Cull Covering Up Infected Soil

Despite a public outcry from the majority of people in the UK, the government and the agriculture industry have proceeded with a highly controversial badger cull. The official story is that it’s to help contain tuberculosis (TB), which can spread from badgers to cattle. In the livestock industry, TB is a death sentence for an infected animal and in some cases entire herds.

However, as ground zero in the war on Mad Cow disease, I’m curious if the UK has a hidden agenda that should be discussed. I propose that they test every dead badger for prion disease. As you probably know, prions are the deadly pathogen responsible for causing Mad Cow disease and other forms of prion diseases. Badgers are likely falling to prion disease because of infected soil. Killing them eliminates a symptom of a bigger health threat in the food and water supplies.

badger cull

Why not test the badgers for prion disease?

  • In the 1980s, the UK killed thousands upon thousands of cattle because of concerns over Mad Cow disease. It’s unknown how many of those cows actually had the disease, but several cases were verified and you don’t wipe out a nation’s entire herd over a frivolous concern.
  • Many of these infected carcasses were just buried, while others were incinerated and the smoke plumes filled the sky. This reckless disposal may have spread the disease further into the soil, groundwater, air and surface water. The world has a tendency to underestimate the prion threat. Buried carcasses may have attracted badger colonies.
  • Prions are deposited in the soil by infected animals’ urine, feces, blood, saliva and tissue.
  • Prions are known to persist in soil for a very long time (some mutated forms might be lethal forever).
  • Prions are known to mutate, migrate and multiply, which means prion-infected animals may have just been the tip of a growing iceberg.
  • Badgers live in the soil where the risk of prion exposure is high.
  • In Wisconsin, mink contracted prion disease by eating the carcasses (and protein meal) of downer cattle that likely had Mad Cow disease.
  • There is not an isolated case of Mad-cow, or any prion disease. The disease can’t be cured and infectious prions can’t be stopped. Cattle are still getting sick from prion disease across the UK and Europe despite the ban on feeding dead cattle back to other cattle. More than 170 cases have been confirmed since 1995.
  • The disease itself is contributing to deadly forms of environmental contamination that essentially recycle and redistribute the disease.
  • A responsible prion surveillance program will test the badger vector since they are determined to kill hundreds and possibly thousands of these tough little creatures. Such a test will help us understand the contagious nature of soil and water runoff.
  • Biosolids and reclaimed wastewater could be infecting badgers with prion disease from humans.

“Prions can survive for years in soil,” (Brown, et al 1991). “Animals can become infected from prions in soil,” (Miller, et al 2004).

biosolids land application and disease

Furthermore, prions can wash from the soil and migrate through irrigation and surface water runoff and settle in groundwater, streams, ponds, lakes, and oceans—where they proceed to multiply and mutate into even more abundant and lethal forms. Wildlife, livestock and humans (especially children) can ingest prions from soil exposure, water exposure, or food. We can’t afford to take the risk of further contaminating entire watersheds – increasing the pathway to humans, livestock, and wildlife downstream.

If the above chain of logic isn’t enough, let’s consider two other potential pathways.

  • Feedlot Waste. Farmers and feedlots will take cattle manure and urine from pens, corals and other holding facilities and spread it on their farmland and pastures where animals graze. My guess is that these are the same facilities that held thousands of at-risk animals back in the Mad Cow epidemic. Every infected animal in these facilities contaminated them permanently with their urine, feces, blood, and saliva. Those facilities are likely still in service today—exposing captive animals and spreading the risk further as fertilizer.
  • Biosolids and Reclaimed Sewage Water. Humans contract prion disease, too, which means our bodily fluids also can transport prions to new pathways (including reclaimed sewage water, sewage sludge—biosolids).

“Prions have been found in the blood and urine of CJD victims,” Gabizon, et al, 2001; Reichl, et al 2002. “Undertakers and medical facilities routinely discharge CJD infected blood and body fluids into public sewers,” Yale, UC Davis, Center for Disease Control.

EPA National Water Research Compendium 2009-2014 lists prions eight times as an emerging contaminant of concern in sewage sludge (biosolids), water and manure.

Renowned prion researcher, Joel Pedersen, University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infective in certain soils.

Oral transmissibility of prion disease is enhanced by binding to soil particles. Dr. Pedersen and associates found that anaerobic digestion in sewage treatment did not inactivate prions in sludge. Persistence of pathogenic prion protein during simulated wastewater treatment processes.

biosolids land application LASS

In the July 3, 2010 issue of Veterinary Record, Dr. Pedersen stated, “the disposal of sludge was considered to represent the greatest risk of spreading (prion) infectivity to other premises.

“Given it is unlikely that the sewage treatment or pellet production processes can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” Toronto (Canada) Department of Health, Nov. 2004.

“Pathogen free” is clearly not the case when the Class A sludge compost can contain infectious human and animal prions. Not only are livestock and wildlife at risk from ingesting prion infected soil and sludge, but humans, and particularly children, are especially at risk because their hand to mouth behavior results in the ingestion of dirt,
(Robischon, 1971; LaGoy, 1987; Binder, et al 1986; Gerba, et al 2002; CDC, Callahan, 2004).

In humans, we have conveniently given prion disease more sophisticated names, but they are equally as savage and deadly. After all, who wants to die from Mad Cow disease? Spin doctors call the human form Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and often blur the lines by calling it Alzheimer’s disease. Pioneering research by Nobel Prize winners and others have now determined that Alzheimer’s disease is a prion disease, which explains why there is not a cure.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

While the death rate from most major diseases are declining, the death rate from Alzheimer’s disease is rising (at least in the United States. My guess is that it’s a global trend.) The differing characteristics in the diseases are likely due to the fact that prions are known to mutate and the genetic makeup of different people and different species likely accounts for other variances in disease characteristics. Most coroners refuse to conduct an autopsy on the body of a person who had prion disease. They know how contagious the body is and how deadly prions are. Meanwhile, these people used public toilets from the point of infection until the day they died. Therefore, the sewage system is permanently contaminated with prions just from one sick patient. What if there have been thousands of infected people? Where has that sewage gone? Badger country. Cattle country. Watersheds that collect rainwater above the streams, ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

To make a long story a little longer, we have pissed in the pool. We owe it to ourselves and our grandchildren to understand the dangers of these foolish practices. Is the badger cull an attempt to rid the countryside of badgers before they are seen dying of prion disease and recycling it back to other animals and livestock? Or is it really just a TB containment precaution? I won’t get into the politics of the matter, but I will hammer on the logic of testing these innocent creatures. If there is a prion epidemic in our soil, we all deserve the truth while there is still a chance of partial containment. Once the prion problem reaches a tipping point, it will change life as we know it.

To learn more about prions and prion disease, please keep reading. We also have a library on this site archived for your review.

prion disease epidemic

Background

Mad Cow disease, technically known as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), is one of many deadly prion diseases (technically referred to as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/tse/tse.htm

We know prion disease as:

  • Mad-cow disease (or BSE in cattle)
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans)
  • Chronic wasting disease (CWD in wildlife such as deer, elk and moose)
  • Scrapie (sheep).

The common denominator in all of these diseases is the prion. In addition, about 10-25 percent of Alzheimer’s disease cases are misdiagnosed—they are actually CJD. In fact, according to Dr. Claudio Soto at the University of Texas, Alzheimer’s is a prion disease. When you sift through the smokescreen and lump these diseases together, it begs the question “do we have a deadly epidemic on our hands and is it being mismanaged.”

Prions are a form of protein that cannot be effectively stopped. They can’t be killed because they are not a virus or bacteria and they don’t contain DNA or RNA. These pathological proteins mutate, migrate, multiply, and intensify. Prion diseases kill everything in their path. In reality, there is no way to contain the disease. There is no cure—prion disease is always fatal.

Prions are a lethal threat to our food and water supplies. We also risk exposure and infection at hospitals, dental offices, restaurants, and through pet food. The buildup of prions in the environment will get worse with time. Mismanagement is accelerating the process. Various forms of prion disease are already spreading around the world, building up in soil and water, and building up in the bodies of virtually every living creature on the planet. The incubation period and the onset of clinical signs of the disease usually take years, which makes these diseases easier to ignore and more difficult to study.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and studying deadly prions. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the growing significance of his discovery. Although his research is ongoing, we know enough about prions to sound the alarm on many levels.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Sounds The Alarm

Prions are such a formidable threat that the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, which included a provision to halt research on infectious prions in all but two laboratories. Now, infectious prions are classified as select agents that require special security clearance for lab research.

Thanks to Dr. Prusiner’s discovery and pioneering research, prion disease has been found in humans, livestock and a variety of wildlife species in several countries, including Austria, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Japan, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, United Kingdom, and the United States.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Not only are prion diseases a symptom of a much bigger problem, they are contributing to the buildup of prions in the environment.  A person or animal with prion disease is contaminating their immediate environment and exposing nearby humans and animals to deadly prions.

The Threat to Public Health

The prion pathogen spreads through urine, feces, saliva, blood, milk, soil, and the tissue of infected animals and humans—including muscle tissue. (Contrary to industry reports and a controversial statement from the World Health Organization, research suggests that milk is a pathway to prion exposure.

If a single person with prion disease discharges bodily fluids or feces into a public sewer system, that sewage system is permanently infected and the amount of contamination will multiply and intensify over time. Everything discharged from that sewage system—reclaimed water or biosolids—is at risk of spreading the contamination even further.

sewage treatment plant and disease

Humans with Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) also are shedding infectious prions into toilets, public sewers and elsewhere (including dental offices and eating utensils). Between 2 and 25 percent of the 4.5 million cases of Alzheimer’s disease and senile dementia victims in the U.S. alone are actually infected with sporadic CJD, creating the reality that many thousands of CJD victims are shedding infectious prions throughout their home and everywhere they visit, (Manuelidis, et al, 1989; Boller, et al, 1989, 1995; Harrison, 1991; Teixeira, 1995; Warren, et al, 2005).

Similar pathways exist from an infected cow, sheep, or deer. When infected animals use fields and feedlots, their urine, feces, saliva, and blood permanently contaminates those areas. That contamination becomes bio-available to every creature that follows the path of the infected animal.

mad cow disease and prions

Mad-Cow Precautions Are Inadequate and Short-Sighted

For example, in Canada, out of 55,415 cows tested for BSE in 2006, five head of cattle were identified with BSE. If the U.S. only tests 40,000 head of cattle and detects one animal with BSE out of that miniscule test group, we must assume that hundreds more infected animals are missed out of the millions milked and slaughtered each year. Based on those statistics, without comprehensive testing globally, we must assume that beef and dairy operations are producing hundreds of sick animals each year that are being milked, slaughtered and consumed by humans, pets, fish farms, and even other forms of livestock and poultry. In addition, the land at the feedlot or dairy is contaminated with manure and urine that often is scraped out and used as compost and fertilizer on farms and gardens, which expands the pathways for deadly prions to reach unsuspecting families.

With these characteristics and dynamics, there is not an isolated case of Mad-cow or any prion disease. The California dairy where the recent infected animal lived and produced milk is contaminated (two dairies have been quarantined since the discovery of that case of BSE). If the infected cow provided milk to a processor, that supply chain is now in question and those supply chains should be quarantined. In fact, all exposed milk should have been immediately recalled from that entire supply chain. The pathways of that milk still should be traced and condemned.

If the infected animal was rendered for pet food, that rendering plant is now permanently contaminated and will contaminate everything that is processed from now on—exposing our pets to the deadly disease and creating a new pathway in our homes—food bowls that also are permanently contaminated (in fact, an undisclosed rendering plant has been quarantined).

If livestock with BSE is actually processed at a slaughterhouse, that slaughterhouse also is permanently contaminated and will contaminate every carcass that follows the infected animal down the production line. Compounding the problem is the fact that liquid wastes from slaughterhouses are rinsed down the drainpipe and into the municipal sewage system, where they add to the risks associated with that waste stream.

 Deadly Prion Pathways

Milk and Meat: As stated earlier, highly infectious risk-material (brain and spine) is not the only pathway to prion exposure. Prions have been found in muscle tissue and milk.

Lessons From The United Kingdom: Initially, UK officials insisted the Mad-cow epidemic was not a risk to humans. After 150 human vCJD deaths, they admitted that they were wrong.

“Thousands of pages of grisly detail on meat-pie making and animal-feed milling might seem like a hard read. As bureaucrats digest the final report of Britain’s BSE inquiry, handed to ministers on October 2nd, 2000 stomachs at the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) and the Department of Health must be churning. Not at the finer points of carcass-rendering, but at what is expected to be a thorough dissection of bureaucratic incompetence. Ministers will be considering the findings until the report is presented to Parliament on October 23rd. Three days later, the public will at last be allowed to read the report into Britain’s biggest public-health scandal for decades.

The independent inquiry was established by the UK government to work out the history of two epidemiological crises, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad-cow disease) and its human relative, new-variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (VCJD). The inquiry’s three-person committee, headed by Lord Phillips, a high-court judge, was also asked to assess whether government and industry responded adequately to the situation as it evolved.

Roughly £27m ($39.4m) and 630 witnesses later, the Phillips report is widely expected to be the definitive word on what went wrong in Britain between the first documented cases of BSE in 1986 and the announcement in Parliament, ten years later, that the strange neurodegenerative condition appearing in a handful of young people, now called VCJD, was probably linked to mad-cow disease.” – The Economist, October 5, 2000.

The Full report from the UK’s BSE Inquiry is available here.

Furthermore, almost 4,000 Britons aged between 10 and 30 may be harboring the prion proteins that cause the human form of Mad-cow disease. The new estimate comes from direct analyses of human biopsies (tonsils), and is much higher than epidemiological projections of the likely number of deaths from variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD).

treat Alzheimer's disease

For years, industry experts and government regulators insisted infectious prions could not be found in blood or muscle except for infected sheep and goats. Prions have since been found in blood and muscle of human vCJD and sCJD victims and in the leg muscle tissue of infected deer.

Even organic supplies are not immune from the prion problem. For example, if an organic farm is downstream from a traditional farm that has an animal with BSE, the water runoff from that farm will expose the organic operation downstream to deadly prions.

Let’s assume that everything that the beef and dairy industries, and the USDA, have said about the latest example of Mad-cow disease is true. The tested animal was sent to a rendering plant and was never destined for the food supply.

  1. How much milk did that dairy cow produce before it exhibited clinical signs of the deadly disease? Where did that milk go? On what date was this sick dairy cow withdrawn from the production line? We know that animals are contagious, and shed prions via bodily fluids, including milk, long before they exhibit clinical signs of the disease.
  2. How many other dairy cows have this fatal and contagious disease, but don’t exhibit the clinical signs, yet? How much milk are these animals producing every day? http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2012/04/mad-cow-bse-milk

Alzheimer's disease and contaminated dental surgical instruments

Surgical and Dental Procedures: We can’t sterilize surgical equipment used on people who have prion disease. Prions are so resistant to sterilization that surgical instruments used on a person with CJD must be disposed because they are permanently contaminated.  Hospitals have been sued successfully for exposing subsequent patients to deadly prions. http://www.bestscientific.co.uk/pdf/LipscombJHI061.pdf http://www.rense.com/ufo6/cjdff.htm http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/11332/31754/31754.pdf

Dental and oral surgery settings have the same challenge, but those industries have ignored those risks for the most part.

Growth Hormones and Blood Transfusions: Most growth hormones are made from the pituitary brain of dead cattle or cloned from the DNA of that pituitary gland (bad idea). One infected gland in the production facility and all future products are permanently contaminated. Dairy and beef producers could be injecting BSE directly into live animals with this practice. Similar practices (taking the pituitary gland from cadavers) have killed people from prion disease, including this very recent case from May 2012: http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/9691038._Mad_cow_disease__killed_man_of_39/

It’s time to stop using growth hormones in beef and dairy cattle. Even if the hormone itself is free of prion disease, what does a growth hormone do to a prion? Has industry or regulators even conducted studies on this dynamic? People have contracted prion disease from infected hormones, infected blood and infected organ transplants. We must assume that the same risk is present for livestock. http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/13/1/06-0396_article.htm

Recent studies of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) indicate that this disease is transmissible by blood. One case of probable transfusion-transmitted vCJD infection has been reported, and one case of subclinical infection has been detected. On February 9, 2006, a third case was announced by the UK Health Protection Agency http://www.hpa.org.uk/hpa/news/articles/press_releases/2006/060209_cjd.htm

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2006/dec/08/health.bse

Each of the three patients had received a blood transfusion from a donor who subsequently developed clinical vCJD, which indicates that transfusion caused the infection.

Pet Food: How many infected animals are sent to a rendering plant, never tested for BSE, and are churned into food for dogs, cats, poultry, fish, and zoo animals? What is the likelihood that we are feeding deadly food to our pets? If and when contaminated, that food dish is another pathway for the prion pathogen to enter our homes and bodies, not to mention the risk to our pets. How often do you actually touch that pet food or the dish? How often do you wash that bowl in your kitchen sink?

Aquaculture: Many fish farms use specified risk material—SRM (brain and spinal cords) from slaughterhouses and rendering plants as protein meal. What is the likelihood that infected material from a slaughterhouse or a rendering plant was sent to a fish farm (either in a large lagoon or in the open ocean) and dumped into the water and consumed by farmed fish (and wild fish and mammals such as dolphins and whales). Since every microscopic prion can’t be consumed, how much water are we contaminating every year to extend this science experiment via new pathways.

This questionable practice puts the health of the fish at risk and those who eat the fish. Secondly, the water that the risk material is dumped becomes contaminated with prions, which threatens groundwater, surface water runoff, streams, rivers, and oceans with deadly prions. This factor could be contributing to the deaths of dolphins and whales and it could be contributing to prion disease in people. Many fish have contracted Whirling disease, which could be a form of prion disease (needs research that this author has not conducted, yet). http://www.allaboutfeed.net/background/the-role-of-renderedproducts-in-aquaculture-feeds-13134.html

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/mad-fish-disease.html

Animal Rendering & Anaerobic Digestion Of Carcasses: “It’s necessary to use additional heat at the end of the rendering process to fully inactivate pathogens.  However, even with this, prions are not inactivated,” APHIS/USDA, January 2005.

“While finished compost can be spread on farmland as fertilizer, if prions are present and the compost is used as fertilizer prions can re-enter the food chain through grazing plants, hay and straw obtained from those areas. Thus, composting should not be used to dispose of infected deer, elk, sheep, goats, or cattle. Composting is especially unsuitable for specified risk materials, especially neural tissues (skull and spinal cord) encased in bones. The indiscriminate use of composting and spreading its byproducts on agricultural land is inconsistent with the FDA feed rule, would dilute its integrity and invalidate all existing BSE/TSE risk assessment models. This is similar to what may have transpired with the CWD material, given the WIDNR (Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources) disposal policy was indeed implemented,” National Renderers’ Association response to USDA and APHIS, June 2005.

Sewage Sludge and Wastewater Reuse: Thousands of tons of sewage sludge (biosolids) are spread on farmland, parks, open spaces, and even lawns and gardens every year. In addition, millions of gallons of sewage water are being reclaimed for various uses.  Spreading sewage sludge and reclaimed sewage water on fields and in our watersheds is another foolish and risky practice. People with CJD (and many with Alzheimer’s disease) excrete prions in their urine, feces, saliva and blood and these recycling practices also are recycling, concentrating and expanding pathological pathways back to humans.

“Prions have been found in the blood and urine of CJD victims,” Gabizon, et al, 2001; Reichl, et al 2002. “Undertakers and medical facilities routinely discharge CJD infected blood and body fluids into public sewers,” Yale, UC Davis, Center for Disease Control.

Other prion-contaminated wastes dumped into sewers include waste from rendering plants (which process remains of up to two million potentially BSE infected downer cows each year), slaughterhouses, morticians, bio-cremation, taxidermists, butcher shops, veterinary clinics, necropsy labs, and hospitals.

Prions are not neutralized by sewage treatment. Therefore, prions become part of the sludge and create pathways to the disease on fields and water runoff. It’s time to quit spreading lies and pathogens on farmland and pastures where livestock graze and where surface water runs off into streams, rivers, lakes and ponds.

Sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. In fact, it concentrates the infectious prions in the sewage sludge being applied on home gardens, cropland, grazing fields and dairy pastures, putting humans, family pets, wildlife and livestock at risk.

“Prions are extremely resistant to inactivation by ultraviolet light, irradiation, boiling, dry heat, formaline, freezing, drying and changes in pH. Methods for inactivating prions in infected tissues or wastes include incineration at very high temperatures and alkaline hydrolysis,” U.S. EPA.

EPA National Water Research Compendium 2009-2014 lists prions eight times as an emerging contaminant of concern in sewage sludge (biosolids), water and manure. http://www.sludgevictims.com/prions/prions-epa-emergingcontaminantsinsludgebio.pdf

Renowned prion researcher, Joel Pedersen, University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infective in certain soils.

http://pathogens.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.ppat.0030093

Oral transmissibility of prion disease is enhanced by binding to soil particles. Dr. Pedersen and associates found that anaerobic digestion sewage treatment did not inactivate prions in sludge. Persistence of pathogenic prion protein during simulated wastewater treatment processes, http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1021/es703186e

In the July 3, 2010 issue of Veterinary Record, Dr. Pedersen stated, “the disposal of sludge was considered to represent the greatest risk of spreading (prion) infectivity to other premises.”

“Given it is unlikely that the sewage treatment or pellet production processes can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” Toronto (Canada) Department of Health, Nov. 2004.

“Pathogen free” is clearly not the case when the Class A sludge compost can contain infectious human and animal prions. Not only are livestock and wildlife at risk from ingesting prion infected soil and sludge, but humans, and particularly children, are especially at risk because their hand to mouth behavior results in the ingestion of dirt,
(Robischon, 1971; LaGoy, 1987; Binder, et al 1986; Gerba, et al 2002; CDC, Callahan, 2004).

Given the volumes of research that clearly point to the risks associated with sewage sludge, how many cattle are being exposed to prions by grazing on land where sewage sludge (biosolids) has been applied? This exposure alone could spawn countless cases of Mad-cow disease around the globe every year. In addition, how many humans have ingested prions directly thanks to this foolish practice? How much water has been contaminated thanks to sewage sludge applications in our watersheds and directly injected into our rivers and oceans?

Sludge proponents claim that there aren’t enough prions in sludge to constitute an infectious dose. “Critics say that one example of outdated assumptions is the Harvard study’s assumption that a cow would have to eat one gram of infected material to come down with the disease. Most scientists now believe a cow would have to eat only 10 milligrams of infected material, a piece the size of a peppercorn, to catch the disease. That’s 100 times smaller than the assumption in the Harvard study. Recent British studies suggest the infectious dose could be 400 micrograms, which is 25 times smaller than 10 milligrams,” said Dr. Michael Hansen.

Above Sources on Sewage Risks Compliments of Helane Shields, Alton, NH.

Additional Documents & Research of Interest

  • “BSE has now been transmitted orally to 16 species,” (S. Dealler, 1995). Animals which have suffered fatal prion diseases include sheep, goats, cattle, pigs, bison, elk, mule and white-tailed deer, oxen, moose, domestic house cats, several species of macaques/monkeys, several species of lemurs, farmed mink, cougars, cheetahs, puma, ocelot, tiger, lion, kudu, oryx, eland, nyala, gemsbok and ankole.
  • Rendered sheep fed to cattle are believed to have initiated the Mad-cow epidemic. Intensive inbreeding of sheep for various genetic characteristics is thought to have spawned prion disease in sheep.
  • Contaminated meat and MBM feed are linked to zoo animal infections. A 1999 report documented three German zoo ostriches, which developed prion disease after eating feed made from downer cattle. An elephant at the Oakland Zoo died of prion disease.
  • Under ordinary circumstances, most sCJD cases go undiagnosed. Few autopsies are done on suspected sCJD victims because the families don’t want to incur the expense. What’s the point if their loved one is already dead? And the pathologist/medical examiner is reluctant to do an autopsy because he/she is concerned about their own risk of infection and the fact that expensive medical instruments may have to be discarded if the case is positive.
  • By binding to a common soil mineral, the misshapen proteins that cause chronic wasting disease in deer can be as much as 700 times more infectious than exposure to the proteins alone, according to researchers at UW-Madison. The finding, by UW-Madison animal health and biomedical science professor Judd Aiken, may help explain why CWD spreads orally among Wisconsin deer even though animals in the wild are exposed to relatively low levels of the infectious proteins, called prions. Herbivores, including deer and sheep, consume a fair amount of dirt each day as they graze. They also are known to consume soil as a source of minerals. Grazing cattle are known to ingest one kilogram of soil per day (2.2 pounds) http://libaio.biol.mcgill.ca/prion

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Recycling Sewage Recycles Brain Disease

Sewage Sludge Spreading Deadly Diseases

I wish that I could support wastewater reclamation and the application of sewage sludge (biosolids). Unfortunately, I have reversed course on my position over the past decade and now I only see unacceptable risks. The reason for my reversal is a microscopic protein particle called a prion.

The problem is that prion diseases are on the rise around the world in people and animals. Since prions cause a deadly, incurable disease in people, wildlife and livestock, it seems to be prudent to question prion pathways and policies. Prion diseases kill everything in their path. There is no cure. They are always fatal. Since prions are unstoppable, they are a threat to food and water supplies around the world. Carelessly spreading prions via any pathway is reckless and criminal. Since the safety of biosolids cannot be proven, the practice must be stopped based on common sense.

We know these prion diseases (transmissible spongiform encephalopathies–TSEs) as:

mad cow disease and prions

Mad Cow (BSE) in cattle. Mad cow disease has emerged significantly around the globe over the past 30 years. Few countries have been immune.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Alzheimer’s disease in humans. At least 10-20 percent of Alzheimer’s disease cases are actually Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Since both are prion diseases, the difference is likely due to genetic and chemistry variations in the host or due to a prion mutation prior to exposure.

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) deer, elk and moose. Meanwhile, prion disease is on the rise among wildlife. Deer, elk, moose and other mammals have been dying from chronic wasting disease for more than 30 years, but the impacted regions continue to spread. The deadly disease has been found from Utah to Pennsylvania and from Canada south to Texas.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Scrapie in sheep. Farmers in Europe have reported sick and incurable sheep for about 300 years or more. Some speculate that this is one of the origins of the outbreak because they over-bred sheep for specific genetic traits and weakened the herds. Then some of the sick animals became feed for other livestock.

While the death rate for many major diseases, including heart disease and many forms of cancer, are declining, the death rate from Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakobs disease are on the rise among many populations (in some regions more than others). If Alzheimer’s and CJD were truly random diseases without environmental influence, the death rate from these diseases would be fairly consistent around the world. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. People who live in Washington State, for example, are lmost twice as likely to die from Alzheimer’s disease as people elsewhere in the nation. Women are almost twice as likely as men to die of Alzheimer’s disease. Why?

People and animals are exposed to prions in multiple ways. Many cattle got the disease from feed that was made from ground up cattle carcasses–a cheap source of protein and an elimination of disposal costs. Some animals have been infected by touching noses with infected animals or licking or ingesting material that sick animals touched. Since infected animals have the deadly prions in their blood, urine, feces, saliva and tissue, they basically contaminate their entire environment–even after death. Animals or carcasses that come along behind them are at risk of exposure and infection. Cattle also are exposed to prions in sewage sludge.

land application sewage sludge

The same risks are present for people. A person with prion disease will permanently infect cups, utensils, dental instruments and surgical instruments. In fact, most coroners refuse to conduct an autopsy on people who are suspected of having prion disease. Call your favorite coroner and ask.

Furthermore, people with prion disease also contaminate their toilets with their bodily fluids and excretions, which contaminate the sewage treatment plant. Just one person with a prion disease will contaminate every sewage system used–forever. Most cities have had more than one resident or visitor with prion disease, which means that prions are incubating and spreading within the pipes and the treatment plants of most sewage plants around the world. Additional prions arrive frequently thanks to the growing population of people with Alzheimer’s disease or CJD.

The prion problem grows thanks to sewage recycling efforts–prions are spread on golf courses, parks and crops as reclaimed water and as biosolid applications. Entire watersheds are at risk as rain, snow and irrigation can rinse the deadly prions into creeks, rivers, ponds, lakes, oceans and groundwater. Some states, such as Wisconsin, have applied biosolids in almost every county of the state. Wisconsin also has one of the worst epidemics of chronic wasting disease in the nation. Unfortunately, the sick deer contribute to the the contamination as they expose other animals, hunters, soil, and water.

The prion problem escalates when you realize that we are dumping millions of gallons of sewage into our rivers and oceans every day. I wonder how many dolphins and whales that beach themselves or just wash ashore are victims of prion disease?

Does it all sound too much like a sci-fi thriller? The plot thickens.

prion disease epidemic

Dr. Stanley Prusiner earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for identifying, naming and studying deadly prions. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the growing significance of his discovery. (In June 2012, Prusiner confirmed that Alzheimer’s disease is a prion disease like CJD and mad cow.)

In fact, prions now are such a formidable threat that the United States government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 to halt research on infectious prions in the United States in all but two laboratories. Now, infectious prions are classified as select agents that require special security clearance for lab research. The intent is to keep prions and other dangerous biological materials away from terrorists who might use them to contaminate, food, water, blood, equipment, and entire facilities.

If prions must be tightly regulated in a laboratory environment today, the outdoor environment should be managed accordingly. If we can’t sterilize surgical equipment used on people who have prion disease, why are we kidding ourselves that we can neutralize prions in sewage? Dilution is not a solution to prion contamination. They don’t have a half-life like radiation. They multiply, which means even one will become many. They can’t be stopped.

biosolids land application and disease

Recycling water and waste is a good idea, except when it concentrates and recycles deadly diseases and pathogens that migrate, mutate and multiply. Prions are worse than radiation. That’s why the Department of Homeland Security has classified them as a “special agent” that must be controlled in only two labs in the entire country. Therefore, we should not make our lands and waters an outdoor chemistry experiment that can blow up in our face–and our children’s.

Any place that recycles sewage water and sewage sludge (biosolids) is spreading pathogens and misinformation–if not outright lies. These lands could someday be condemned as Superfund sites and our diminishing water supplies could be further lost to permanent contamination.

For more information on this topic please visit http://garychandler.com/pandoras-lunchbox-filled-with-prions/ you will see that the EPA and others are mismanaging these prion risks. I hope that you don’t make the same mistake. I would be happy to discuss this matter and consult with your agency to manage this issue.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

Fact Sheet

Alzheimer’s disease patients shed infectious prions in their blood, saliva, mucus, urine
and feces. The infectious prions bind to the sewage sludge, including sludge biosolids compost, being applied on home gardens, US cropland, grazing fields and dairy pastures,
putting humans, family pets, wildlife and livestock at risk.

Other prion contaminated wastes discharged to sewers include rendering plants (which process remains of 2 million potentially BSE infected downer cows each year), slaughterhouses, embalmers and morticians, biocremation, taxidermists, butcher shops, veterinary and necropsy labs, hospitals, landfill leachates (where CWD infected and other carcasses are disposed), etc.

The US EPA lists prions as a contaminant of concern in sewage sludge and water
eight times. The EPA issued what it calls the “Sludge Rule,” which basically disclaims any responsibility for its premature and questionable risk assessments as it relates to all toxins and pathogens found in biosolids. It reserves the right to adjust the risk assessments as the test of time may disprove its pseudo-science.

Renown prion researcher, Dr. Joel Pedersen, University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infective in certain soils. Dr. Pedersen’s research also proved sewage treatment does not inactivate prions.

sewage treatment plant and disease

“Our results suggest that if prions were to enter municipal waste water treatment systems, most of the agent would partition to activated sludge solids, survive mesophilic anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids. Land application of biosolids containing prions could represent a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results argue for excluding inputs of prions to municipal waste water treatment,” said Pedersen.

“Prions could end up in waste water treatment plants via slaughterhouse drains, hunted game cleaned in a sink, or humans with vCJD shedding prions in their urine or feces,” Pedersen says. “The disposal of sewage sludge was considered to represent the greatest risk of spreading (prion) infectivity to other premises.” It is well known that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables. 

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency recently warned that plants can uptake infectious prions: “. . . there is a potential risk to humans via direct ingestion of the compost or of compost particles adhered to skin or plant material (e.g. carrots). Another potential route of exposure is by ingestion of prions that have been taken up by plants.”

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Gary Chandler is a public affairs, public relations and issue management strategist with Crossbow Communications, based in Denver and Phoenix. http://crossbowcommunications.com/alzheimers-disease-surging-due-to-misinformation-mismanagement/ Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.