Recycling Sewage Recycles Brain Disease

Sewage Sludge Spreading Deadly Diseases

I wish that I could support wastewater reclamation and the application of sewage sludge (biosolids). Unfortunately, I have reversed course on my position over the past decade and now I only see unacceptable risks. The reason for my reversal is a microscopic protein particle called a prion.

The problem is that prion diseases are on the rise around the world in people and animals. Since prions cause a deadly, incurable disease in people, wildlife and livestock, it seems to be prudent to question prion pathways and policies. Prion diseases kill everything in their path. There is no cure. They are always fatal. Since prions are unstoppable, they are a threat to food and water supplies around the world. Carelessly spreading prions via any pathway is reckless and criminal. Since the safety of biosolids cannot be proven, the practice must be stopped based on common sense.

We know these prion diseases (transmissible spongiform encephalopathies–TSEs) as:

mad cow disease and prions

Mad Cow (BSE) in cattle. Mad cow disease has emerged significantly around the globe over the past 30 years. Few countries have been immune.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Alzheimer’s disease in humans. At least 10-20 percent of Alzheimer’s disease cases are actually Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. Since both are prion diseases, the difference is likely due to genetic and chemistry variations in the host or due to a prion mutation prior to exposure.

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) deer, elk and moose. Meanwhile, prion disease is on the rise among wildlife. Deer, elk, moose and other mammals have been dying from chronic wasting disease for more than 30 years, but the impacted regions continue to spread. The deadly disease has been found from Utah to Pennsylvania and from Canada south to Texas.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Scrapie in sheep. Farmers in Europe have reported sick and incurable sheep for about 300 years or more. Some speculate that this is one of the origins of the outbreak because they over-bred sheep for specific genetic traits and weakened the herds. Then some of the sick animals became feed for other livestock.

While the death rate for many major diseases, including heart disease and many forms of cancer, are declining, the death rate from Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakobs disease are on the rise among many populations (in some regions more than others). If Alzheimer’s and CJD were truly random diseases without environmental influence, the death rate from these diseases would be fairly consistent around the world. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. People who live in Washington State, for example, are lmost twice as likely to die from Alzheimer’s disease as people elsewhere in the nation. Women are almost twice as likely as men to die of Alzheimer’s disease. Why?

People and animals are exposed to prions in multiple ways. Many cattle got the disease from feed that was made from ground up cattle carcasses–a cheap source of protein and an elimination of disposal costs. Some animals have been infected by touching noses with infected animals or licking or ingesting material that sick animals touched. Since infected animals have the deadly prions in their blood, urine, feces, saliva and tissue, they basically contaminate their entire environment–even after death. Animals or carcasses that come along behind them are at risk of exposure and infection. Cattle also are exposed to prions in sewage sludge.

land application sewage sludge

The same risks are present for people. A person with prion disease will permanently infect cups, utensils, dental instruments and surgical instruments. In fact, most coroners refuse to conduct an autopsy on people who are suspected of having prion disease. Call your favorite coroner and ask.

Furthermore, people with prion disease also contaminate their toilets with their bodily fluids and excretions, which contaminate the sewage treatment plant. Just one person with a prion disease will contaminate every sewage system used–forever. Most cities have had more than one resident or visitor with prion disease, which means that prions are incubating and spreading within the pipes and the treatment plants of most sewage plants around the world. Additional prions arrive frequently thanks to the growing population of people with Alzheimer’s disease or CJD.

The prion problem grows thanks to sewage recycling efforts–prions are spread on golf courses, parks and crops as reclaimed water and as biosolid applications. Entire watersheds are at risk as rain, snow and irrigation can rinse the deadly prions into creeks, rivers, ponds, lakes, oceans and groundwater. Some states, such as Wisconsin, have applied biosolids in almost every county of the state. Wisconsin also has one of the worst epidemics of chronic wasting disease in the nation. Unfortunately, the sick deer contribute to the the contamination as they expose other animals, hunters, soil, and water.

The prion problem escalates when you realize that we are dumping millions of gallons of sewage into our rivers and oceans every day. I wonder how many dolphins and whales that beach themselves or just wash ashore are victims of prion disease?

Does it all sound too much like a sci-fi thriller? The plot thickens.

prion disease epidemic

Dr. Stanley Prusiner earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for identifying, naming and studying deadly prions. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the growing significance of his discovery. (In June 2012, Prusiner confirmed that Alzheimer’s disease is a prion disease like CJD and mad cow.)

In fact, prions now are such a formidable threat that the United States government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 to halt research on infectious prions in the United States in all but two laboratories. Now, infectious prions are classified as select agents that require special security clearance for lab research. The intent is to keep prions and other dangerous biological materials away from terrorists who might use them to contaminate, food, water, blood, equipment, and entire facilities.

If prions must be tightly regulated in a laboratory environment today, the outdoor environment should be managed accordingly. If we can’t sterilize surgical equipment used on people who have prion disease, why are we kidding ourselves that we can neutralize prions in sewage? Dilution is not a solution to prion contamination. They don’t have a half-life like radiation. They multiply, which means even one will become many. They can’t be stopped.

biosolids land application and disease

Recycling water and waste is a good idea, except when it concentrates and recycles deadly diseases and pathogens that migrate, mutate and multiply. Prions are worse than radiation. That’s why the Department of Homeland Security has classified them as a “special agent” that must be controlled in only two labs in the entire country. Therefore, we should not make our lands and waters an outdoor chemistry experiment that can blow up in our face–and our children’s.

Any place that recycles sewage water and sewage sludge (biosolids) is spreading pathogens and misinformation–if not outright lies. These lands could someday be condemned as Superfund sites and our diminishing water supplies could be further lost to permanent contamination.

For more information on this topic please visit http://garychandler.com/pandoras-lunchbox-filled-with-prions/ you will see that the EPA and others are mismanaging these prion risks. I hope that you don’t make the same mistake. I would be happy to discuss this matter and consult with your agency to manage this issue.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

Fact Sheet

Alzheimer’s disease patients shed infectious prions in their blood, saliva, mucus, urine
and feces. The infectious prions bind to the sewage sludge, including sludge biosolids compost, being applied on home gardens, US cropland, grazing fields and dairy pastures,
putting humans, family pets, wildlife and livestock at risk.

Other prion contaminated wastes discharged to sewers include rendering plants (which process remains of 2 million potentially BSE infected downer cows each year), slaughterhouses, embalmers and morticians, biocremation, taxidermists, butcher shops, veterinary and necropsy labs, hospitals, landfill leachates (where CWD infected and other carcasses are disposed), etc.

The US EPA lists prions as a contaminant of concern in sewage sludge and water
eight times. The EPA issued what it calls the “Sludge Rule,” which basically disclaims any responsibility for its premature and questionable risk assessments as it relates to all toxins and pathogens found in biosolids. It reserves the right to adjust the risk assessments as the test of time may disprove its pseudo-science.

Renown prion researcher, Dr. Joel Pedersen, University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infective in certain soils. Dr. Pedersen’s research also proved sewage treatment does not inactivate prions.

sewage treatment plant and disease

“Our results suggest that if prions were to enter municipal waste water treatment systems, most of the agent would partition to activated sludge solids, survive mesophilic anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids. Land application of biosolids containing prions could represent a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results argue for excluding inputs of prions to municipal waste water treatment,” said Pedersen.

“Prions could end up in waste water treatment plants via slaughterhouse drains, hunted game cleaned in a sink, or humans with vCJD shedding prions in their urine or feces,” Pedersen says. “The disposal of sewage sludge was considered to represent the greatest risk of spreading (prion) infectivity to other premises.” It is well known that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables. 

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency recently warned that plants can uptake infectious prions: “. . . there is a potential risk to humans via direct ingestion of the compost or of compost particles adhered to skin or plant material (e.g. carrots). Another potential route of exposure is by ingestion of prions that have been taken up by plants.”

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Gary Chandler is a public affairs, public relations and issue management strategist with Crossbow Communications, based in Denver and Phoenix. http://crossbowcommunications.com/alzheimers-disease-surging-due-to-misinformation-mismanagement/ Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Blood Infected With Prions Threatens Public Health

Undiagnosed Victims Are Contagious

British officials warn that almost 30,000 Britons carry a dormant form of mad cow disease unknowingly and it may affect the blood supply, the Global Post is reporting.

Surgical and dental equipment used on a person with prion disease cannot be sterilized and can infect subsequent patients with the deadly disease.

Experts said up to 1,000 people could die from receiving infected blood via tainted blood donations. A study published this month by the government’s Health Protection Analytical team found that 1 in 2,000 Britons may be “silent” carriers of the disease proteins.

Mad cow disease or variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a degenerative brain disease that had started from people eating beef from diseased cows but now can be spread through blood transfusions.

Millions of animals were killed in the 1980s and 1990s in Britain and 176 people died from the disease. Officials say that no new cases have been reported in the past two years.

prion disease epidemic

“There is no room at all for complacency,” former Labor Health Secretary Frank Dobson said. “With a blood test, you would be able to screen every potential donor. If that screening showed the incidence was higher than thought, then maybe you would do it for the whole population.”

Officials said the 176 death count could increase more than five times because the disease has not been eradicated from the blood supply like it was from the food supply, The Telegraph reported.

Canada had a similar exposure to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) via blood transfusions several years ago. All countries are at risk from this ongoing threat to our blood supplies, not to mention the risks associated with dental equipment, utensils and other items that can be reused after a person with prion disease has contaminated them with saliva, blood or other bodily fluids.

Prion News via http://alzheimerdisease.tv/creutzfeldt-jakob-disease/ 

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Horse Slaughter Back In New Mexico

Land Of Enchantment Will Kill Horses

About five miles from this southeastern New Mexico town’s famed UFO museum, tucked between dairy farms, is a nondescript metal building that could be home to any number of small agricultural businesses.

slaughter horse in U.S.

But Valley Meat Co. is no longer just another agricultural business. It’s a former cattle slaughterhouse whose kill floor has been redesigned for horses to be led in one at a time, secured in a huge metal chute, shot in the head, then processed into meat for shipment overseas.

It’s also ground zero for an emotional, national debate over a return to domestic horse slaughter that has divided horse rescue and animal humane groups, ranchers, politicians and Indian tribes.

And Tuesday, it moved one step closer to becoming the first plant in the country in more than six years to slaughter horses, with a successful inspection by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

At issue is whether the majestic symbols of Western culture are livestock or pets, and whether it is more humane to slaughter them domestically than to ship tens of thousands of neglected, unwanted and wild horses thousands of miles to be slaughtered in Mexico or Canada.

Front and center in the debate is Rick De Los Santos, who along with his wife, Sarah, has for more than two decades worked this small slaughterhouse, taking in mostly cows that were too old or sick to travel with larger herds to the bigger slaughterhouses for production.

Now, with cattle herds shrinking amid an ongoing drought, De Los Santos says he and his wife are just trying to transform their business and make enough money to retire. They’re seeking to slaughter domestically some of the thousands of horses that De Los Santos says travel through the state every month on their way to what are oftentimes less humane and less regulated plants south of the border.

“They are being slaughtered anyway. We thought, well, we will slaughter them here and provide jobs for the economy,” De Los Santos said.

Instead, Valley Meat has been ensnarled in a yearlong political drama that has left the plant idle and its owners the target of vandalism and death threats – warnings that increased after humane groups found a video a former plant worker posted of himself cursing at animal activists, then shooting one of his own horses to eat.

“People are saying, `We will slit your throat in your sleep. We hope you die. We hope your kids die,'” De Los Santos said. “Sometimes it’s scary. … And it’s all for a horse.”

Indeed, voicemails left on the company’s answering machine spew hate and wishes for violence upon the family.

“I hope you burn in hell,” said one irate woman who called repeatedly, saying, “You better pack your (expletive) bags (expletive) and get out of there because that place is finished.”

The couple have hired security and turned over phone records to federal authorities. They are, nevertheless, surprisingly candid about their plans, offering media access to the 7,200-square-foot slaughterhouse with one kill floor and two processing rooms that De Los Santos says can process 50 to 100 horses a day.

“It’s complicated, this industry of feeding the world,” Sarah De Los Santos says matter-of-factly. The meat would be processed for human consumption and exported to countries in eastern Europe and Asia.

Attorney Blair Dunn says agriculture officials found no issues at Valley Meat Co. during Tuesday’s inspection and told the owners they are recommending a grant of inspection be issued immediately.

The plant passed a similar inspection last year but then was told it couldn’t begin operations until the USDA developed an acceptable test to measure the horse meat for drug residue.

It wasn’t until the plant sued the USDA for blocking its application that the agency earlier this year agreed to move forward with the inspections necessary to allow Valley Meat Co. and about a half-dozen other plants around the country to slaughter horses.

But the Obama administration wants to prohibit such slaughters. The administration’s 2014 budget request excludes money for inspectors for horse slaughter plants, which would effectively keep them from operating.

The USDA did not respond to an email from The Associated Press asking about the inspection process and whether a drug test has been developed.

But Dunn said Department of Justice lawyers repeatedly have assured him that there are no impediments to the plant opening. Dunn says he expects final approval for the plant to come in a matter of days.

Wild horses held by the BLM.

“Everyone is talking about this as a humane issue,” De Los Santos said. “This is not a humane issue. It’s politics.”

Humane groups and politicians including Gov. Susana Martinez and New Mexico Attorney General Gary King strongly oppose the plant. They argue that horses are iconic animals in the West, and that other solutions and more funding for horse rescue and birth control programs should be explored over slaughter.

Fueling opposition is a recent uproar in Europe over horse meat being found in products labeled as beef.

Still others are pushing for a return to domestic slaughter. Proponents include several Native American tribes, the American Quarter Horse Association, some livestock associations and even a few horse rescue groups that believe domestic slaughter would be more humane than shipping the animals elsewhere.

They point to a 2011 report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office that found horse abuse and abandonment increasing since Congress effectively banned horse slaughter by cutting funding for federal inspection programs in 2006. Because rescue groups can’t take care of all of the horses in need, tens of thousands have been shipped to slaughterhouses in Mexico.

In this mostly agricultural town, touted on its welcome sign as the Dairy Capital of the Southwest, there is surprisingly little uproar over the plant.

“I was against it,” said Larry Connolly, a retiree having coffee at Starbucks last week. “Then I started talking to some ranchers. They said they were for it. So I’m neutral.”

Local horse trader and former rancher Dave McIntosh said opening the plant would be the “best thing for the welfare of horses.”

But Sheriff Rob Coon said he believes most people in town oppose the plant. His office was inundated with calls and emails from irate people after the horse-killing video was discovered online last month. The former Valley Meat worker posted the video more than a year ago in response to animal activists opposed to horse slaughter.

“A lot of the ranchers are for it, simply because they want a place to take a horse rather than starve it out,” he said. “But it’s not our society. We don’t eat horses.”

Coon said his department has met with other local agencies in preparation for protests and potential trouble should the plant get the green light to open. But he clearly longs for the day when Roswell – whose main street is populated with statues of green extraterrestrials – was known for a rumored 1947 UFO landing, and little else.

“I was just telling our county manager: `What happened to our aliens?'” Coon said.

Horse Slaughter News http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20130423/us-horse-slaughter/?utm_hp_ref=homepage&ir=homepage

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Public lands and wildlife conservation are among our specialties. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Chronic Wasting Disease Fueled By Sewage Sludge

Biosolids Spreading Brain Disease

By Patrick Durkin

Those who think Wisconsin should just “learn to live” with chronic wasting disease are seeing their surrender take shape as “nature takes its course” on our deer herd.

In fact, folks near Spring Green are living the realities of such clichés. One farmer in the Wyoming valley of north-central Iowa County has shot 21 CWD-positive deer from his family’s 700 acres since 2008, with 11 falling since April 2012.

Those are just a few of the sick deer in a 144-square mile area where CWD (prion disease) is rising at “unprecedented” rates. That one-word assessment came from Bryan Richards, CWD project leader at the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, after reviewing the latest CWD reports from Robert Rolley, a Department of Natural Resources researcher in the wildlife science bureau.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Rolley, Richards and about 50 other citizens, biologists and agency staff were at UW-Stevens Point on April 6 to help implement 62 recommendations from the “Deer Trustee Report,” Dr. James Kroll’s guide to revamping Wisconsin deer management.

Rolley, too, used one word — “frightening” — to assess CWD’s increase in the 12- by-12-mile area around the Wyoming valley. The eastern border of this diseased block abuts CWD’s core area (northeastern Iowa and northwestern Dane counties), where the disease was first discovered 11 years ago.

What constitutes “unprecedented” and “frightening?” First, realize the infection rate in the core area is increasing about 10 percent annually. That resembles annual infection rates of mule deer in southeastern Wyoming’s Converse area, where 40 to 50 percent of the herd is infected with CWD.

prion disease epidemic

Now consider north-central Iowa County:

• CWD’s annual growth rate for all deer (both sexes combined) 2½ years and older is 27 percent.

• Annual disease rates for adult bucks (18 months and older) are doubling every two to three years.

• Roughly every third buck 2½ years and older is infected, as is one in every six yearling bucks (18 months old). Infected deer live two years or less.

• Although the number of diseased females is lower, the infection rate for does 2½ years and older is growing 38 percent annually, faster than for males.

I’m not aware of data anywhere showing wild, free-range deer with similar infection rates,” Richards said. “The only thing worse was the Stan Hall farm (Buckhorn Flats, near Almond), whose penned herd of 76 deer went from one sick deer to 60 in five years.”

That might sound like mere statistics to some, but not to Matt Limmex, 49, an Iowa County dairy farmer who has spent his life on the family’s property. Of the 11 sick deer killed on Limmex’s lands the past year, six fell during 2012 gun seasons.

land application sewage sludge

The other five? Limmex shot them at the DNR’s request after noticing the “droolers and shakers” near his farmyard. In three cases, they were so sick they couldn’t flee when Limmex approached. The DNR retrieved the carcasses for testing and disposal.

“I hate to see this,” Limmex said. “It’s disheartening. I just want to get sick deer off the landscape.”

Limmex said his family deploys about 14 hunters each year during gun season. They’ve also used agricultural shooting permits since 1991 to control the herd. Even so, this is the first time he senses deer numbers decreasing.

“It seems like the disease might be affecting the herd now,” he said.

biosolids land application and disease

So, what’s causing CWD rates in the Wyoming valley to exceed those in the original disease zone? And will it shrink local herds, as experts have long predicted? No one knows, and our state and federal governments aren’t inclined to find out.

The only current DNR-funded deer research by the University of Wisconsin is studying whether predators are affecting North Woods whitetails. Meanwhile, Professor Michael Samuel at the University of Wisconsin is using federal funds to study if deer leave CWD-causing prions in feces, breeding scrapes and mineral licks. But that’s ending soon.

“We’re puzzled by what’s going on in the Wyoming valley,” Samuel said. “It’s very disturbing, but CWD research is on the way out. We could generate hypotheses and proposals to study what’s behind the increases, but I doubt we’d get the funding. There’s little interest in CWD these days, Wisconsin and nationwide.”

Imagine that. The world’s most “disturbing,” “frightening” and “unprecedented” CWD case is growing next door to our capital and flagship university, and our government won’t crack a window to sniff it.

Meanwhile, no group or coalition of hunters, doctors, veterinarians or environmentalists is holding politicians accountable, or funding the research themselves. There’ll be no shortage of shame as this stench spreads.

CWD News Via

http://host.madison.com/sports/recreation/outdoors/patrick-durkin-cwd-s-spreading-and-herd-hunters-deserve-better/article_580298ad-6fcc-5a9c-9cdf-1d6beff51e23.html#ixzz2SA0Z7VLc

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

North Carolina Confirms 17 Cases Of CJD Since 2011

Three People Die Of CJD In Cleveland County Recently

It started with double vision. That’s when Ellen Horton knew something was wrong with her husband, Raymond. The couple was en route back to Shelby from a car show in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., in September. She described his driving as erratic.

creutzfeldt jakob disease outbreak in North Carolina

“He was all over the road. He would run off the road and cross the center lines,” she said. “I found out (that) to him, the line in the roads were curved because of his eyes.”

The couple visited multiple doctors searching for answers. None surfaced. With time, daily activities became a strain for the Marine Corps veteran. His sight never came back. His arms stiffened.

“He couldn’t hold a sandwich. He forgot where his mouth was to feed him,” Horton remembered. “He was fine in Pigeon Forge. He saw the ceiling fan continuously turning, but the fan was off.”

 

Reading became impossible for Raymond. The avid reader had read the Bible more than once. Horton said all Raymond wanted was his eyesight back. Tears sat on the rim of her eyelids. What Raymond is believed to have battled affects less than 400 people each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

biosolids management land application

It would be December before Horton discovered what plagued her husband. Raymond saw Dr. Kevin Klein, head neurologist of Klein Neurology and Sleep, in December. Klein used an EEG and MRI to gain a closer look inside Raymond’s brain.

“He was unsteady when he walked. He had recent issues with memory,” Klein recalled.

The answers lied in the MRI scan, which shows detailed images of organs and tissues. Parts of Raymond’s brain cortex appeared white on the MRI scan. Klein said the discoloration, or abnormal diffusions, were similar to what doctors see in stroke patients. Raymond never had a stroke.

“Most people who have what he did don’t lose their vision first, but he did,” Klein said.

CJD Diagnosis

Klein diagnosed Raymond with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The rare, degenerative brain disease — not unlike mad cow disease — is marked by abnormal proteins called prions that can develop in humans and animals, the CDC reports.

land application sewage sludge

It was previously reported two Cleveland County deaths with links to CJD, one in December and another in January. Both deaths were labeled “probable cases” of CJD.

CJD can come in various forms, including classic/sporadic, which develops naturally in humans. It can lay dormant for many years. Symptoms usually surface about age 65 in those affected, according to the National Library of Medicine’s website. The disease is contagious.

Horton found relief in her husband’s diagnosis. But Raymond’s condition worsened. He was admitted to Cleveland County Hospice in mid-December. Nurses bathed and shaved him. Members from the N.C. Foothills Marine Corps League Detachment 1164 visited their former commandant while he was in Hospice. Horton recalled a moment where she laid her head on her ailing husband.

“I told him I loved him,” she said. “His mouth moved and I read, ‘I love you, too.’”

She sat calmly on her living room couch. A white tissue caught the falling tears from her eyelids.

“He went through three months of hell,” Horton said.

Raymond died Dec. 28. He was 66 years old.

All forms of CJD are fatal. There is no known cure.

More CJD Cases In North Carolina

Klein diagnosed two other patients in Cleveland County with sporadic CJD in 2012. Both were between 60 and 70 years old. Both passed away shortly after.

“That’s a high number,” Klein said. “It’s unknown where sporadic CJD comes from.”

CJD can mirror other diseases such as dementia, Alzheimer’s and some later-staged cancers. Symptoms include difficulty speaking and swallowing, memory loss, blurred vision and jerky movements, according to the National Library of Medicine’s website. Raymond displayed all of them.

About 85 percent of CJD cases in the nation are sporadic, the CDC reports. Since 2011, The N.C. Department of Health and Human Services reported 17 confirmed cases of CJD. Nine were labeled probable. Most with sporadic CJD live up to seven months before succumbing to the disease, the MayoClinic reports.

CJD can only be confirmed through a brain biopsy or a cerebrospinal fluid test, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke’s website. All three of Klein’s patients are called “probable cases” of CJD because neither test was performed. Any tests to confirm CJD must be arranged by the hospital handling the case, it was previously reported.

Horton said, because CJD was new to her, she didn’t realize a brain biopsy could be done. Later, Horton requested a test on Raymond’s spinal fluids from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem. The results are pending.

Horton believes Raymond suffered from CJD after a doctor from Wake Forest Baptist agreed with Klein’s diagnosis.

“I didn’t want to put his body through anymore,” Horton said about opting out of a brain biopsy.

Horton described her husband as an “all-around kind of guy.” Those who found a father figure in Raymond called him “paw-paw” or “Daddy Raymond.” She doesn’t know if Raymond knew he had CJD.

“He never asked about it or mentioned it,” she said. “I still wonder if I’m going to end up with it.”

Raymond’s case was the first time Horton heard of CJD. It could be the same for many others.

She hopes sharing Raymond’s story not only leads to closure, but awareness.

“We don’t know what we’re walking around with in our bodies. We don’t,” she said. “So little is known about it.”

Horton clutched a framed picture of Raymond smiling. He wore a Marines cap. Horton said, she and Raymond lived to help others.

She wants his story to do the same.

Prion News Update via http://www.gastongazette.com/news/local/doctor-probable-case-of-rare-fatal-disease-third-for-area-in-recent-months-1.112799

Prions Not Stopped By Species Barriers

Prion Disease Killing Many Mammals

Prions are known to migrate, mutate and multiply. They become more voracious as they move from one host to another. New research adds to the bank of evidence that a deadly prion is a deadly prion and they know no borders between species. For years, food safety experts and wildlife managers have put people at ease by hiding behind the myth of species barriers. Blind faith can kill you when it comes to prion dynamics.

Canadian researchers recently discovered a slight change in prions’ makeup appears to give mad cow disease the ability to adapt and spread to other animals. Mutation still is likely a more accurate term, but “adaptation” is close enough for government work. I think the “adaptation” is the equivalent of a chemical reaction that takes place when prions are exposed to a new bank of proteins in a new host (victim).

prion disease epidemic

Neurologist Valerie Sim and her research team at the University of Alberta said the findings might explain how prion diseases, such as chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease, adapt in order to spread between various types of animals.

The prions’ makeup appears to give the disease the ability to adapt by mimicking and recreating new strains with which it comes into contact.

“Prion diseases don’t always successfully go from one animal to another, but when they do, the process is called adaptation. And we want to figure out what triggers that process to happen, what changes happen within prions to allow the disease to spread,” Sim said in a statement.

land application sewage sludge

“One of the important things researchers in this field have realized is that if you pass certain strains of prion disease through a number of different hosts, the disease can adapt along the way and increase the number of susceptible hosts. That’s the big concern right now.”

The findings were published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These diseases are known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins and likely is killing whales.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2013/03/17/Mad-cow-disease-adaptation-key-found/UPI-34591363498413/#ixzz2Np9pCJ6h

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Prions Not Phased By Sewage Treatment Processes

Deadly Prion Proteins Survive Wastewater Treatment Process

By Michael Woods

Scientists in Wisconsin are reporting in a paper scheduled for the July 1 issue of ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology that typical wastewater treatment processes do not degrade prions. Prions, rogue proteins that cause incurable brain infections such as Mad Cow disease and its human equivalent, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Alzheimer’s disease are difficult to inactivate, resisting extreme heat, chemical disinfectants, and irradiation. In fact, prions are known to migrate, mutate and multiply.

Until now, scientists did not know whether prions entering sewers and septic tanks from slaughterhouses, meatpacking facilities, or private game dressing, could survive and pass through conventional sewage treatment plants.

sewage treatment plant and disease

Joel Pedersen and colleagues used laboratory experiments with simulated wastewater treatment to show that prions can be recovered from wastewater sludge after 20 days, remaining in the biosolids, a byproduct of sewage treatment sometimes used to fertilize farm fields.

Although emphasizing that prions have never been reported in wastewater treatment plant water or biosolids, the researchers note that existing tests are not sufficiently sensitive to detect the extremely low levels of prions possible in those materials. In other words, they have never been proven to be free of prions or capable of stopping them from being released back into the environment with discharges or sewage sludge.

land application sewage sludge

As such, wastewater treatment plants are spreading this infectious waste far and wide because they are incapable of stopping prions. All by-products and discharges from wastewater treatment plants are infectious waste, which are contributing to the global epidemic of neurodegenerative disease among humans, wildlife and livestock. Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA and the industry trade organization—the Wastewater Effluent Federation. Sewage sludge (biosolids) and wastewater reclamation are causing widespread contamination.

Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more.

The proof is in the pudding, so to speak. Deer, elk, moose and reindeer are now contracting prion disease from humans. To help cloak the epidemic, it’s called chronic wasting disease (CWD). Deer with CWD are proverbial canaries in a coal mine.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

When cattle are exposed to prions, it’s being called mad cow disease or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, which is just a clever way of saying transmissible spongiform encephalopathy). Species barriers are a myth and part of the cover-up.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. If they can’t stop prions in the friendly and sterile confines of an operating room, they can’t stop them in the wastewater treatment plant.

biosolids land application and disease

The risk assessments prepared by the U.S. EPA for wastewater treatment and sewage sludge are flawed and current practices of recycling this infectious waste is fueling a public health disaster. Many risks are not addressed, including prions and radioactive waste. They don’t mention prions or radiation because there is no answer. Most nations are making the same mistake. We’re dumping killer proteins on crops, parks, golf courses, gardens, ski areas, school grounds and beyond. Wind, rain and irrigation spread these contaminants and many more throughout our communities and watersheds. It’s time to stop the land application of sewage sludge (LASS) in all nations. Safer alternatives exist.

For more information, read “Persistence of Pathogenic Prion Protein during Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes,”  http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es703186e

Contact the leading expert on prions in soil and sewage sludge, Joel A. Pedersen. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Madison, Wisconsin
Phone: (608) 263-4971
Email: japedersen@soils.wisc.edu

Prion News via http://engineeringevil.com/2012/09/13/prions-are-not-degraded-by-conventional-sewage-treatment-processes/

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

More Mismanagement of Deadly Mad Cow Disease

Prion Pathogen Highly Contagious

After eight years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reopened the comment period for its rule on what cow parts may be used in human products Monday because research completed since the interim rule was published has revealed traces of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and deadly prions in parts of the intestine currently allowed in human food and drugs.

mad cow disease

Since there is no way to ever sterilize the production line once infected with prions, just one infected animal part will contaminate the production line forever. Food, cosmetics, gel caps, lotions and other products could kill you and your family. Even our water supplies have been compromised due to prion mismanagement, including sewage mismanagement.

The report is alarming. Again, it shows that regulators are protecting the public health with blind faith, ignorance and incompetence. We must demand that deadly prions be regulated based on proven safety as opposed to one of a proven risk (ie. dead people). It took them eight years of status quo to raise this flag and countless products have been contaminated in the interim. As a result, we can only guess how many families have been exposed to this deadly and incurable prion disease. This is reckless, negligent and unforgivable. It’s criminal. It’s bioterrorism.

In 2005, FDA issued its interim final rule, “Use of Materials Derived From Cattle in Human Food and Cosmetics,” which stated that a cow’s small intestine was safe for use in human products as long as the portion called the distal ileum had been removed. At the time, the distal ileum was known to be a potential reservoir for BSE, also known as mad cow disease, but other parts of the small intestine were considered safe.

mad cow disease and prions

Since that time, studies have found low levels of BSE in other parts of the cow’s intestine, including the proximal ileum, jejunum, ileocecal junction, and colon, prompting concerns that perhaps the U.S. Department of Agriculture (which regulates meat safety) and FDA should also prohibit these parts from use in human foods and cosmetics. Of course, they should be kept out of rendering facilities, where they can be recycled back into products and animal feed (including pet food). In fact, we should demand answers about where the risky parts, such as the distal ileum, spinal cords, eyes, tonsils, and other specified risk material (SRM) are going now.

“The infectivity levels reported in these studies were much lower than the infectivity levels that were previously demonstrated in the distal ileum,” notes FDA. (It only takes one prion to kill you, so, I’m not feeling any safer despite this disclaimer.)

In light of these findings, FDA has reopened the comment period on its 2005 interim final rule in order to hear from anyone who has information on the topic. These are questions that should have been asked long ago.

When the FDA announced the reopened comment period, it stated that it believes that the trace levels of infectivity found in these other parts of the intestine don’t pose a risk of human exposure to BSE in the United States. That’s nonsense. Prions migrate, mutate and multiply. They can’t be stopped. So to say that the levels of infectivity are low further demonstrates the FDA’s and USDA’s incompetence or willingness to tolerate and unleash risks to the public.

“We want to hear from other people,” says Sebastian Cianci, spokesperson for FDA. “From what we’re seeing, we’ve concluded that there wouldn’t be a measurable reduction of risk from removing other parts. However, we want other people to weigh in before a final determination is made.”

In reaching its conclusion, FDA says it also considered a recent opinion from the European Union Food Safety Authority on the risk of BSE from parts of the small intestine other than the distal ileum. Why aren’t they actively seeking and sharing this information on a global basis? The bad news is that other prion risks remain unchecked and or mismanaged. The pathways to prion contamination in food, water, products and our healthcare systems are numerous.

A look at the opinion handed down from EFSA’s Panel on Biological Hazards shows that the group was unable to draw a conclusion about the safety of other parts of a cow’s intestine. Bullshit. It’s time to put all of the facts on the table and keep all risks off of our dinner table and out of our homes and hands. prions have been classified as a “select agent” by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Research is tightly controlled and extremely limited. Why are the USDA and FDA conducting chemistry experiments with them in our food, water, cosmetics and other products? What gives them the right to turn every human on the planet into a guinea pig? Any person or agency that violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Prevention Act of 2002 is, by definition, a terrorist.

“Due to limitations in the data currently available, an accurate quantification of the amount of infectivity in the intestinal parts other than ileum of Classical BSE infected cattle at different stages of the incubation period cannot be provided,” says the panel in its conclusion. Unfortunately, given the dangers of prions, it only takes one to multiply into millions. It only takes one prion to kill you. Quantification of this dynamic is very simple math.

The reopened comment period has been posted in the Federal Register. You can access it  here. Comments can be submitted by clicking the “Submit a Formal Comment” button.

Thanks to Gretchen Goetz and Food Safety News for their contribution to this article. http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/03/fda-seeks-comments-on-risk-of-bse-from-cow-intestines/#.UTYS9IXxOkF

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

More Chronic Wasting Disease Found In Texas

Chronic Wasting Disease Spreading In Texas

With the help of hunters, nearly 300 tissue samples were collected for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing from mule deer. All deer were killed in the Trans Pecos region of West Texas during the 2012-13 season. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) have confirmed CWD in four of those samples. Apparently, all CWD-positive deer were harvested within the CWD Containment Zone.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Of 298 deer sampled during hunting season, 107 were harvested in the Containment Zone, 93 were harvested in the adjacent High Risk Zone, 25 were harvested in the Buffer Zone, and 73 deer were harvested outside of the CWD zones. Nineteen of the samples collected from the Containment Zone were from deer harvested in the Hueco Mountains.

“The good news is that CWD has not been detected in Texas outside of the Hueco Mountains of northern El Paso and Hudspeth counties,” said Mitch Lockwood, Big Game Program Director with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Including the two positives reported from TPWD’s strategic sampling effort last summer, and the three positives reported by New Mexico Game and Fish last year, CWD has been detected in 9 of 31 deer sampled in the Hueco Mountains.

CWD is a member of the group of diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Other diseases in this group include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) in cattle, and Cruetzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. CWD among cervids is a progressive, fatal disease that commonly results in altered behavior as a result of microscopic changes made to the brain of affected animals.

land application sewage sludge

An animal may carry the disease for years without outward indication, but in the latter stages, signs may include listlessness, lowering of the head, weight loss, repetitive walking in set patterns, and a lack of responsiveness. CWD is not known to affect humans.

There is no vaccine or cure for CWD, but steps have been taken to minimize the risk of the disease spreading from beyond the area where it currently exists. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission and Texas Animal Health Commission adopted rules restricting movement of deer, elk, and other susceptible species within or from the CWD Zones, and enhancing surveillance efforts.

Source: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/newsmedia/releases/?req=20130211c

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Indonesia Bans U.S. Beef Over Mad Cow Disease

Indonesia Closes Ports To American Beef

When authorities discovered a case of mad cow disease in Hanford, California last year, Indonesia became the first nation to ban beef from the United States. The fallout was immediate, and U.S. beef sales to Indonesia plummeted to nearly nothing.

mad cow disease and Indonesia

Much to the satisfaction of cattle producers in states such as California and Texas, the U.S. government has decided to fight back: In the latest case to go before the World Trade Organization, the Obama administration is pressing Indonesia to open its markets and its estimated 240 million consumers to more American exports or face consequences.

“There’s no scientific basis for turning away U.S. beef,” said John Harris, owner of Harris Ranch Beef Co., the family-run operation in Fresno County since the 1930s.

Kevin Kester, a fifth-generation rancher from Parkfield in the Coast Range foothills beyond Coalinga, called Indonesia’s action a “knee-jerk political action.”

And with U.S. beef exports accounting for nearly 13% of the industry’s market last year, cattle producers say they rely on selling meat to foreigners to make a living. Industry officials say that foreign markets have become particularly important for meat cuts that won’t sell here. The Japanese, for example, have shown an affinity for cow tongue, helping drive up the value of U.S. beef sold to Japan by 19% in 2012.

Last month, U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk said the United States had reached a new agreement with Japan to remove some of the restrictions on selling beef, a move that he said would result in hundreds of millions of dollars of additional sales in coming years.

“We’re not subsidized by the federal government at all — so we live and die by the marketplace,” said Kent Bacus, associate director of legislative affairs in Washington for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a trade group that represents 230,000 breeders, producers and feeders.

The stakes are high for the U.S. economy, with the beef industry supporting 1.4 million jobs, according to industry statistics. And in 2011, the 742,000 beef herds roaming the nation’s pastures resulted in $44 billion of economic activity in the United States, the beef association said.

The Indonesian Embassy in Washington would not discuss the case but said in a statement that Indonesia “takes note” of the U.S. action and will respond in a timely manner.

“The government of Indonesia’s aim is not to restrict imports, but to ensure that all imported goods are safe for consumption by consumers and safe for the environment,” said the statement, released by Ni Made Ayu Marthini, a commercial attache.

The push to gain more access to Indonesia comes amid hard times for the U.S. cattle industry, the world’s largest supplier of beef.

John Keating, president of Cargill Beef, recently noted that the size of the U.S. cattle herd is now at its lowest point since 1952.

It’s a familiar story for Kester, 57, who owns a ranch in Monterey County, with more than 20,000 acres between the San Joaquin Valley and Central Coast. He has spent all his life in the cattle industry and has watched it shrink, with the average age of a rancher now approaching 60.

“It’s harder and harder for ranchers and farmers to be in business because of high regulatory costs and high land prices across the nation, especially places like here in California,” said Kester, former president of the California Cattlemen’s Association. “As time marches on, we just have less and less people in the business and less production.”

Industry officials say the ban in Indonesia now has been replaced with tight quotas and requirements that force U.S. exporters to apply for licenses, making it nearly impossible for cattle producers to sell their products.

Mad Cow disease is a form of prion disease. Prion disease in humans is called Creutzfeldt-Jakobs disease. Even Alzheimer’s disease is now considered a form of prion diseases. Prion diseases of all forms are always fatal. Prions themselves are known to migrate, mutate and multiply. As a rogue form of protein, prions cannot be killed, stopped or neutralized. Infected animals and humans contaminate their environment and risk infecting others via blood, saliva, urine and feces.

By Rob Hotakainen – Bee Washington Bureau. Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/2013/02/08/3166790/us-fights-indonesia-beef-ban-after.html#storylink=cpy 

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

CJD Exposure Horrifies Brain Cancer Patient

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Contaminates Surgical Instruments With Prions

Five years after 43 surgery patients were warned that they might have been infected with Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) from contaminated instruments, some are still reeling from its impacts. For New Zealander Danielle Lambermon the exposure might yet cost her her life. Like others, the 26-year-old says she has been shunned by dentists, because of a fear of infection that an Australian CJD advocate rejects as ignorant discrimination.

Alzheimer's disease and contaminated dental surgical instruments

Worse, she is too scared to undergo further surgery to remove the two-thirds of the brain tumor left behind after the operation that led to her CJD exposure in 2007. Miss Lambermon was one of 43 patients told in April 2007 that they were at risk of fatal brain disease CJD, after an Auckland Hospital patient died of the disease following surgery.

“I hate being in the hospital,” Miss Lambermon said, sobbing. “I’m supposed to have another operation and really don’t know if I’m going to. I don’t think I can handle this any more.”

Like all forms of prion disease, CJD is caused by hardy prions that can survive all sterilization procedures.

Hearing the news while still recovering from largely unsuccessful brain surgery pushed Miss Lambermon further into depression. Five years on, without further surgery, the cancer has progressed.

“It has already taken her life in most regards,” Miss Lambermon’s mother Monique said. “Words can’t explain how it makes me feel.”

Another unexpected consequence was that dentists would not treat Miss Lambermon, because of infection concerns. About a month ago she ended up at Auckland Hospital’s emergency department with a snapped tooth, after an untreated cavity got progressively worse. Greenlane Hospital’s dental department has agreed to treat her, but that involves conquering her hospital fear.

Mangawhai resident Trish Gardner’s son Ben, now 29, was one of the first operated on after the initial CJD patient infected the surgical instruments that were used over and over again–exposing everyone behind him. When he needed root canals, their local dentist said he would not treat him due to fears of exposing his dental patients to the same situation. Auckland Hospital helped find him another dentist and contributed $500. But instead of root canals, which might have been an infection risk, he has now had six teeth removed and requires $8,000 of remedial work that he can’t afford.

“We just felt a bit abandoned,” Mrs Gardner said.

Australian CJD support group network national coordinator Suzanne Solvyns said denying dental treatment showed “appalling ignorance.”

prion disease epidemic

Herself at risk of getting CJD after accidental exposure, she had no trouble accessing dental care in Australia. Newly issued Australian infection control guidelines meant low-risk patients could receive any routine dental treatment, including root canals, Mrs Solvyns said.

Dental Association chief executive David Crum said uncertainty still surrounded the patients’ risk and infection control status. Until clear New Zealand guidelines were established Auckland Health Board should instruct patients on how to get safe care.

An Auckland District Health Board spokeswoman said the board believed community dental practices should be able to provide routine care, but they had provided dental treatment for at least one patient who had not been able to get community treatment.

Miss Lambermon, her mother, Mrs Gardner and Mrs Solvyns all criticized Auckland Hospital’s lack of initial and ongoing support.

Asked what the health board had done to keep track of, and provide ongoing support to, the 43 patients, the spokeswoman said follow-up varied from case to case. CJD risk management had been changed to minimize the risk of the surgical contamination being repeated.

Editor’s Note: This risk is real. People infected with prion disease can expose their entire environment via saliva, blood, urine and other bodily fluids. Surgical and dental instruments, utensils, cups, drinking glasses, toothbrushes and other items should be isolated upon diagnosis to minimize exposure to friends, family and practitioners from deadly prion disease, which is always fatal to people and animals once infected. Unfortunately, many people are unaware that they are carriers until the disease progresses to the final stages. Alzheimer’s also appears to be a prion disease. Caretakers should take the same precautions to protect themselves.

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Japan Will Ease Mad Cow Disease Restrictions on U.S. Beef

Pathogen Behind Mad Cow Disease Unstoppable

For only the second time in ten years, Japan will further ease restrictions on U.S. beef imports starting to allow entry of beef and beef products from cattle less than 30 months of age. They will implement the new regulation on February 1, 2013.Previously, a 2006 restriction limited U.S. beef imports to products from cattle under 20 months of age. Japan set that restriction when it allowed limited U.S. beef imports to resume after a cow with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was found in a U.S herd in 2003.Japan’s easing of restrictions on U.S. beef imports is a sign that there is more product demand than fear in the Asian nation about BSE, popularly known as Mad Cow Disease.

mad cow disease and Japan imports of U.S. beef

Opening Japan’s market to more U.S. beef will result in “hundreds of million of dollars in exports of U.S. beef to Japan in coming years,” according to a statement by U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack.

Kirk and Vilsack depicted the trade agreement as a “near normalization” of beef trade between the two nations. “This is great news for American ranchers and beef companies, who can now—as a result of this agreement—increase their exports of U.S. beef to their largest market for beef in Asia,” Ambassador Kirk said.

Kirk called it a “significant and historic step” that will grow American exports and jobs.

Japan banned U.S. beef in 2003 after the first cow with BSE was discovered near Mabton, WA. It took three years before it allowed some imports from the younger animals.

Japan’s independent Food Safety Commission (FSC) conducted a risk assessment in 2011 that found raising the age limit in conjunction of U.S. controls on specific risk materials (SRM) could address safety concerns.

land application sewage sludge

The expanded U.S. beef exports to Japan could reach the country by mid February and will likely put upward pressure on prices as American cattle numbers are at the lowest levels in 60 years. The drought affecting much of the U.S. has caused farmers and ranches to reduce their herds because dry lands aren’t producing enough to support the cattle.

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.