Wakatobi A Diver’s Paradise

World-Class Scuba Diving Across Indonesia

Indonesia has some of the best scuba diving and snorkeling destinations in the world. Wakatobi National Park is one of the most fascinating diving destinations in all of Indonesia.

Wakatobi (pronounced WAHK-kah-TOH-bee) features a luxury dive resort in southeastern Sulawesi, Indonesia. The area includes 143 islands, but only four of them are inhabited. Since 2005 the park has been listed as a tentative World Heritage Site. In 2012 it was added to the World Network of Biosphere Reserves.

Wakatobi was established following an extensive search to identify the perfect location for a dive resort in terms of geography, climate, oceanic topography and marine biodiversity. To ensure its future, the developers created one of the largest privately protected marine reserves in the world.

Wakatobi is the third largest marine park in Indonesia. It hosts 942 fish species and 750 coral reef species, versus 50 in the Caribbean and 300 in the Red Sea. Wakatobi covers 1.4 million hectares. It includes the highest number of reef and fish species in the world. The islands form the largest barrier reef in Indonesia, second only to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. Jacques Cousteau called the Wakatobi area an “Underwater Nirwana.”

Wakatobi scuba dive

Having identified the premier location, the developers built an island paradise with the essential facilities and comforts to make an unforgettable dive trip. From shore or by boat, you have exclusive access to 50 dive sites, miles of pristine reefs, where diverse and dramatic undersea landscapes harbor the highest level of marine biodiversity on the planet. New and undocumented species continue to be discovered at Wakatobi.

The House Reef is a cornucopia of marine life, which you can enter directly from the beach or the jetty. The coral top is host to sea grass offering refuge to species such as filefish, blue ringed octopus and bumphead parrotfish, while the corals are home to numerous colorful juveniles of many species. The dramatic drop off where the wall begins offers glimpses out into the blue and down the wall – turtles, bumphead parrotfish, rays, mild mannered triggerfish, box fish and puffer fish can be seen among many other species.

Wakatobi’s resident octopus can put on quite a show for those who know where to look. The creature displays native cunning; it adapts, and learns and you’ll find it lurking on the reefs of Wakatobi. Octopi truly are among the ocean’s most intriguing animals. The reefs and shallows around Wakatobi are home to several dozen species of these stealthy cephalopods, and should you spot one, you are in for an entertaining treat. Some are masters of camouflage and misdirection, while others use a combination of natural cover and improvised props to cloak their movements.

In a tranquil island setting far from crowds and cities, with no other divers for at least 100 miles, Wakatobi seamlessly blends five-star amenities and civilized comforts with a pristine natural environment; a pairing that has secured its reputation as one of the world’s finest resorts.

Underwater visibility is mostly between 20 and 50 meters. You can enjoy diving 365 days a year at Wakatobi. The climate is drier than most parts of Indonesia, and the surrounding reefs and islands protect the area from major storms.

Whether you are a non-diver or would simply like to take a break from the scheduled dives, Wakatobi offers a several non-diving activities, both water-based and on land, to absorb you whether you are looking for physical or intellectual distraction.

Visitors also enjoy kite surfing, paddle boarding, yoga, meditation, nature walks and village tours.

The inhabited islands are home to about 100,000 people, including the Bajo communities. The Bajo are seafaring nomads who inhabit many of Indonesia’s remote islands. They believe that they direct descendants of the sea. Once known as nomadic sea gypsies, the children are taught to hunt and preserve the ocean. They also possess unbelievable skills such as walking on the ocean floor and diving at depths of 25-50 meters without the aid of scuba gear. They can survive for months at sea without food supplies or modern equipment.

Anano Beach is a great place to observe sea turtles in their natural habitat. The incredible white sandy beach is home to two types of sea turtles, Honu (green turtles) and Koila (hawksbill turtles). Depending on the timing of your trip, you might get to see the turtles spawn, hatch and migrate to sea. The optimal time to observe spawning is during the full moon where green turtles usually gather at the shoreline in preparation to lay their eggs in the early hours of the morning. This enchanting beach is also a popular spot for divers and sun loungers.

Adventurers also enjoy the majestic Lakasa cave, which is is filled with beautiful stalactites and stalagmites. The cave descends 120 meters. Locals believe that it has mystical properties. East and West come together at Wakatobi’s spa, which blends the best of Indonesian and European traditions.

Read The Full Story About Wakatobi, Sulawesi, Indonesia

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The Top Destinations In Indonesia

Visit Everything From The Jungles To Jakarta

Indonesia is a very large and diverse country. With 18,110 islands, 6,000 of them inhabited, it is the largest archipelago in the world. The population of 240 million people is composed of about 300 ethnic groups who speak more than 250 different languages. While Bali and Jakarta are often the destinations of choice for business and pleasure, let’s explore some other top tourist attractions in Indonesia.

Yogyakarta: This is the historic and cultural capital of Java and Indonesia. The sultan of Java lives here in the Kraton. The area features some of the most impressive ancient monuments in Indonesia–Borobudur and Prambanan. Borobudur is the largest Buddhist monument in the world, while Prambanan is one of the largest Hindu monuments in the world. Mt. Merapi is visible from Yogyakarta and most of the region.

Indonesia volcano

Merapi is one of the most active volcanoes in all of Indonesia. Yogyakarta also is famous for its arts, especially batik fabrics. Bicycles and horse-drawn carts are still very common forms of transportation in the region, which gives the area a special charm, despite its sprawling size. Yogyakarta also is a university city, which gives it even more character.

Komodo Island: The only way to reach Komodo is by boat, which is an experience that can’t be missed in this island nation. Most visitors arrive on large live-aboard boats, which is a first-class way to eat and sleep in this extremely remote region.

The Komodo dragons live on three islands in the area–Komodo, Rinca and Padar. A few have even crossed the strait to the western tip of Flores. These arid, volcanic islands are inhabited by about 5,700 giant lizards, which grow as large as 12 feet long (three meters). They exist nowhere else in the world and are of great interest to scientists studying the theory of evolution.

Komodo dragon

The local villagers call the Komodo dragon ora, which means land crocodile. The dragons are normally a sandy brown with dark markings against very coarse and dry scales. They have a long neck and a tail that is longer than their body. They have strong, sharp claws that are used in combat with other dragons and during feeding frenzies.

The rugged hillsides of dry savannah and pockets of thorny green vegetation contrast with the brilliant white sandy beaches and the blue waters surging over coral. Although the dragons are the primary attraction to the area, these waters offer some of the best scuba diving in the country and the world. The marine fauna and flora are generally the same as that found throughout the Indo Pacific area, though species richness is very high, notable marine mammals include blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) and sperm whale (Physeter catodon) as well as 10 species of dolphin, dugong (Dugong dugon) and five species of sea turtles.

Camp Leakey: Tanjung Puting National Park is located on the island of Borneo in the Indonesian province of Central Kalimantan. The park is a popular ecotourism destination, with many local tour companies offering multi-day boat tours to view wildlife and visit the research centers. Wildlife include gibbons, macaques, clouded leopards, sun bears, pythons, crocodiles and – most famously – orangutans. Unfortunately the park is heavily threatened by illegal logging and forest clearing for agricultural uses., this is your best opportunity to see orangutans in their own habitat. Some are being rehabilitated, while wild orangutans also visit the area, which is not fenced.

orangutan Camp Leakey

With some luck, you might meet, Dr. Birute Galdikas. In the early ’70s, Dr. Galdikas traveled from Los Angeles to the Indonesian province of Central Kalimantan on Borneo island to study the red-haired primates. She has spent much of the last 45 years on the island, researching the orangutan and fighting to protect its habitat.

Bunaken: Located at the north of the island of Sulawesi, Bunaken is one of Indonesia’s most famous dive and snorkeling areas. The island is part of the Bunaken Marine Park where you can see more than 70 percent of all fish species that live in the western Pacific ocean.

dive Indonesia

Indonesia is an epicenter of underwater biodiversity, hosting a greater variety of marine life than anywhere else on earth. The South China Sea, the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean converge here, on the world’s largest archipelago of more than 18,000 islands, and the result is spectacular diving. Thriving off Indonesia’s vast coastline are more than 600 coral and 3000 fish species. The best time for diving in Bunaken is between April and November.

Torajaland: Also known as Tanah Toraja, this is a highland region of Sulawesi, home of the Toraja people. Torajans are famous for their massive peaked-roof houses and spectacular funeral rites. The region also features some interesting megaliths.

Lake Toba: Lake Toba is on the island of Sumatra. It’s an immense volcanic lake about 100 kilometers long and 30 kilometers wide. Formed by a gigantic volcanic eruption some 70,000 years ago, it is the largest resurgent caldera on Earth. Genetic estimates suggests that there were only a few thousand humans that survived the catastrophe. The island in the middle – Pulau Samosir – is the largest island within an island and contains two lakes. Tourists from around the world come here to relax and swim in the volcanically warmed waters. The volcanic activity of this region produces fertile land and beautiful scenery. It also contains rich deposits of coal and gold.

spa Bali

Ubud: Perched high in the hillsides, Ubud is much cooler and greener than life on the beaches far below. Ubud is considered the cultural heart of Bali and one of the top tourist attractions in Indonesia. There are dance and music performances every day throughout the city as well as numerous art galleries and craft shops to explore. Although Ubud has long been valued as a great place to learn about Balinese culture. Tourism in Ubud boomed exponentially in the last decades. Fortunately, it only takes a short walk or bicycle ride to escape from the crowds and commercialism. An area called the monkey forest sits on the edge of town and its filled with wild monkeys that will beg you for food.

Raja Empat: This is a fascinating diving destination near Papua. It’s a great region to see manta rays and other rare marine life. Over time, tourists mispronounced the name so much that even locals refer to the area as Raja “Ampat.” Don’t be fooled and please don’t perpetuate the error. Raja Empat means “four kings.” As with the best diving in Indonesia, this trip requires a live-aboard boat.

The waters of Raja Empat boast more than 1200 marine life species. The reefs at Kofiau are filled with colorful soft and hard corals that hide myriad creatures while blue and gold fusiliers flow like living rivers of color overhead. These coral bommies and gardens harbor some of the highest marine biodiversity in the region. At Northwest Misool, a blue water mangrove maze of trees meets the color of the reef. If you’re a photographer who likes over/under images, you’ll want to take up permanent residence. The Passage is a narrow river of sea between Waigeo and Gam Islands, the coral here grows pretty much to the surface and you’ll find piles of nudibranchs, sharks, cuttlefish and octopus among the soft corals.

dive Indonesia

Wakatobi: Wakatobi is a world-class scuba diving destination. It’s drop-off is famed for its action and color, with everything from blue ringed octopus and ghost pipe fish to resident sea turtles cruising past soft corals and gorgonians. Lembeh is renowned for muck diving. With a sharp eye, you’ll find banded snake eels, pygmy seahorses, octopus, scorpion fish and literally hundreds of extraordinarily well-camouflaged critters. Almost anything could be hiding in the black sand.

Those who make the journey to Wakatobi are well rewarded. Above water, the islands are stunning. Below, the diverse and memorable house reef is home to creatures ranging from the small and strange to giant mantas and resident turtles. In addition, the readily accessible coral garden at Teluk Maya harbors Pegasus sea moths, pipe fish, and an endemic pygmy seahorse species.

Many dive sites feature thick forests of vibrant soft corals, which hide lots of animals. Seamounts dominate the extraordinarily photogenic dive at Blade where sea fans, sponges and corals abound and seem to have positioned themselves in the most picturesque places on the reef.

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Indonesia Travel News via http://indonesiantravelbook.com/indonesias-top-destinations/

Palm Oil Casts Dark Shadow Over Corporate Buyers

Sustainability Claims Riddled With Fraud, Abuse

Today Amnesty International has published a damning new report into the practices of major consumer goods multinationals. The human rights NGO unpicks the palm oil supply chain and finds evidence of forced labor, child employment and dangerous working conditions within the palm oil supply chain.

Although the company primarily under investigation is Wilmar, the world’s largest palm oil producer, it is the brand names that this firm suppliers that faces the charity’s opprobrium. Colgate, Nestlé and Unilever all come under heavy criticism for allowing conditions to emerge in their supply chains that many would regard as shocking.

palm oil deforestation

Amnesty International interviewed 120 workers within Wilmar’s plantations, as well as digging deeper into their  suppliers in Indonesia.

“Corporate giants like Colgate, Nestlé and Unilever assure consumers that their products use sustainable palm oil, but our findings reveal that the palm oil is anything but,”noted Meghna Abraham, Senior Investigator at Amnesty International.

“Companies are turning a blind eye to exploitation of workers in their supply chain. Despite promising customers that there will be no exploitation in their palm oil supply chains, big brands continue to profit from appalling abuses.”

Palm oil is a highly versatile product that is estimated to be in half of all consumer products, ranging from toothpaste to shampoo. It is mostly produced in Indonesia, which services over half of global demand.

The palm oil sector is rife with corporate social responsibility issues and is linked to deforestation, where its land-intensive farms denude the Indonesian jungle and deny rare species, such as orangutans, of habitation. It also is an area of alleged worker exploitation.

palm oil deforestation

The Amnesty International report describes a punishing work regime with demanding performance targets. Failure to meet objectives can yield financial deductions. Penalties are levied at the manager’s discretion.

Many laborers, the reporters find, feel compelled to work 10-11 hour-long days, accumulating to exceed the legal maximum of 40-hours per week in Indonesia. Despite this grueling schedule many claim they are paid beneath the legal minimum wage.

The report finds that, such are the pressures under which workers are placed, they enlist their spouses and children to toil unpaid to avoid penalties from the employer. The charity found children as young as eight in employment, many of whom dropped out of school to meet their quota.

“I get the premi [bonus] from the loose fruit that’s why my kids help me<” said a plantation worker. “I wouldn’t be able to meet the target otherwise. The foreman sees my children helping me. The foreman says it is good that my child is helping me.”

Indonesia bans child labor.

Amnesty International also finds evidence of using paraquat, highly dangerous herbicide. The chemical is banned in the European Union and Wilmar itself has made commitments to phase out its use. The report finds that suppliers are still routinely making use of the chemical.

forest conservation

The investigators  found one instance of a worker that was splashed in the face by the chemical, leading to severe injuries.  “I can’t see through the eye. I get headaches in part of my head, when I do, my eye feels really swollen. I still get a bit dizzy.”

These allegations are obviously serious and, if true, highly damaging to the brands concerned. Wilmar acknowledge the report’s findings, and urged many within the industry to help combat these issues.

Read The Full Story About Palm Oil Abuses at http://www.forbes.com/sites/jwebb/2016/11/30/amnesty-international-slams-colgate-nestle-and-unilever-for-palm-oil-supply-chain-abuses/2/#456cd1564161

Sumatran Tiger Habitat Trashed By Paper Giant

Indonesia’s Most Unique Resources On Verge Of Extinction 

An environmental NGO claims that deforestation conducted by Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) and its supplier companies has affected the endangered Sumatran tiger.

World Wildlife Fund for Nature (WWF) Indonesia communication coordinator Desma Murni said in Jakarta on Sunday that there were many forestry timber concession areas that overlapped with the habitat of the endangered Sumatran tiger – most of them in areas not yet entitled to legal protection.

rainforest conservation palm oil plantations

“As the concession holder, from the very beginning APP has not shown responsible conduct by felling trees in areas identified as the habitat of the protected species,” she said as quoted by Antara news agency.

Desma said the Sumatran tiger was the only tiger sub-species left in Indonesia. Based on 2004 official data, she said, only around 400 Sumatran tigers could be found in their natural habitat and the number continued to decline due to excessive land clearing.

“If we continue to let this happen, the Sumatran tiger as a top predator will go extinct,” said Desma.

palm oil deforestation

She said APP may no longer conduct forest clearance activities in the area. However, according to Eyes on the Forest (EoF) reports, as of April, the pulp and paper industry had continuously carried out natural forest clearance even after it signed a commitment to stop clearing natural forests.

Desma said most of APP’s industrial forest permit (HTI) concession areas, particularly in Sumatra, were located in peat lands, which used a drainage system as a water management system.

The company’s new forest conservation police (FCP) has indicated it will continue and/or carry out high conservation value (HCV) and high carbon stock (HCS) studies in areas that are both still heavily covered with forests and can produce natural timber.

“In fact, as we know, most of APP’s HTI concession areas have been cleared and converted into acacia plantations. It’s very unlikely there will be an evaluation of natural forests as stipulated in the HCV and HCS study plans,” she said.

Desma added the safety of Sumatran tigers and their existence in both the Kerumutan and Pulau Muda blocks remained a question due to APP’s lack of transparency in tackling human and animal conflicts.

Source: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2013/11/24/app-criticized-tiger-habitat-loss.html

Indonesia Bans U.S. Beef Over Mad Cow Disease

Indonesia Closes Ports To American Beef

When authorities discovered a case of mad cow disease in Hanford, California last year, Indonesia became the first nation to ban beef from the United States. The fallout was immediate, and U.S. beef sales to Indonesia plummeted to nearly nothing.

mad cow disease and Indonesia

Much to the satisfaction of cattle producers in states such as California and Texas, the U.S. government has decided to fight back: In the latest case to go before the World Trade Organization, the Obama administration is pressing Indonesia to open its markets and its estimated 240 million consumers to more American exports or face consequences.

“There’s no scientific basis for turning away U.S. beef,” said John Harris, owner of Harris Ranch Beef Co., the family-run operation in Fresno County since the 1930s.

Kevin Kester, a fifth-generation rancher from Parkfield in the Coast Range foothills beyond Coalinga, called Indonesia’s action a “knee-jerk political action.”

And with U.S. beef exports accounting for nearly 13% of the industry’s market last year, cattle producers say they rely on selling meat to foreigners to make a living. Industry officials say that foreign markets have become particularly important for meat cuts that won’t sell here. The Japanese, for example, have shown an affinity for cow tongue, helping drive up the value of U.S. beef sold to Japan by 19% in 2012.

Last month, U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk said the United States had reached a new agreement with Japan to remove some of the restrictions on selling beef, a move that he said would result in hundreds of millions of dollars of additional sales in coming years.

“We’re not subsidized by the federal government at all — so we live and die by the marketplace,” said Kent Bacus, associate director of legislative affairs in Washington for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a trade group that represents 230,000 breeders, producers and feeders.

The stakes are high for the U.S. economy, with the beef industry supporting 1.4 million jobs, according to industry statistics. And in 2011, the 742,000 beef herds roaming the nation’s pastures resulted in $44 billion of economic activity in the United States, the beef association said.

The Indonesian Embassy in Washington would not discuss the case but said in a statement that Indonesia “takes note” of the U.S. action and will respond in a timely manner.

“The government of Indonesia’s aim is not to restrict imports, but to ensure that all imported goods are safe for consumption by consumers and safe for the environment,” said the statement, released by Ni Made Ayu Marthini, a commercial attache.

The push to gain more access to Indonesia comes amid hard times for the U.S. cattle industry, the world’s largest supplier of beef.

John Keating, president of Cargill Beef, recently noted that the size of the U.S. cattle herd is now at its lowest point since 1952.

It’s a familiar story for Kester, 57, who owns a ranch in Monterey County, with more than 20,000 acres between the San Joaquin Valley and Central Coast. He has spent all his life in the cattle industry and has watched it shrink, with the average age of a rancher now approaching 60.

“It’s harder and harder for ranchers and farmers to be in business because of high regulatory costs and high land prices across the nation, especially places like here in California,” said Kester, former president of the California Cattlemen’s Association. “As time marches on, we just have less and less people in the business and less production.”

Industry officials say the ban in Indonesia now has been replaced with tight quotas and requirements that force U.S. exporters to apply for licenses, making it nearly impossible for cattle producers to sell their products.

Mad Cow disease is a form of prion disease. Prion disease in humans is called Creutzfeldt-Jakobs disease. Even Alzheimer’s disease is now considered a form of prion diseases. Prion diseases of all forms are always fatal. Prions themselves are known to migrate, mutate and multiply. As a rogue form of protein, prions cannot be killed, stopped or neutralized. Infected animals and humans contaminate their environment and risk infecting others via blood, saliva, urine and feces.

By Rob Hotakainen – Bee Washington Bureau. Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/2013/02/08/3166790/us-fights-indonesia-beef-ban-after.html#storylink=cpy 

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Palm Oil Promoting Wildlife Extinction

Palm Oil Destroying Biodiversity

Palm oil plantations supplies to vegetable oil and biofuels could be accelerating the effects of climate change, new research shows, adding further credibility to claims the crop is not environmentally sustainable and eliminates biodiversity, which is pushing many species toward extinction.

An international team of scientists examined how the deforestation of peat swamps in Malaysia to make way for palm oil trees is releasing carbon which has been locked away for thousands of years. Their report has been published in the journal Nature.

deforestation and endangered species

Microbes then penetrate the carbon and the harmful greenhouse gas carbon dioxide is released, which is thought to be the biggest contributor to global warming.

Unsustainable methods of growing crop-based biofuels have come under fire as environmentalists question their overall impact on the environment and the atmosphere.  Most palm oil plantations are contributing to deforestation and total carbon buildup in atmosphere.

As governments and companies look to biofuels to provide a low-carbon alternative to fossil fuels in transport, the industry has expanded rapidly. More than 80 percent of palm oil is grown in Indonesia and Malaysia. According to some estimates, an area the size of Greece is cleared every year for palm oil plantations. Palm oil is especially attractive because it is cheaper than rapeseed oil and soybean oil for biodiesel.

palm oil deforestation

However, leaked European Union data has shown palm oil biodiesel to be more polluting than conventional gasoline when the effects of deforestation and peat-land degradation is taken into account.

In their study, the research team measured water channels in palm oil plantations in the Malaysian peninsular which were originally peat swamp forest. They found ancient carbon came from deep in the soil, then broke down and dissolved into nearby streams and rivers as deforestation occurred.

“We have known for some time that in South East Asia oil palm plantations were a major threat to biodiversity–and that the drainage could release huge amounts of carbon dioxide during the fires seen there in recent years,” said Chris Freeman, one of the authors of the report and an environmental scientist at the University of Bangor in Wales.

rainforest conservation palm oil plantations

“But this discovery of a ‘hidden’ new source of problems in the waters draining these peatlands is a reminder that these fragile ecosystems really are in need of conservation,” he added.

There are approximately 28,000 square kilometers of industrial plantations in Malaysia, Sumatra and Borneo and there are even more planned, making them a major contributor to peat swamp deforestation in the region, the paper said.

“Our results are yet another reminder that when we disturb intact peat swamps and convert them to industrial biofuel plantations, we risk adding to the very problem that we are trying to solve,” Freeman said.

Indonesia deforestation and endangered species

Industry efforts to bring this deforestation under control have come through the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). It was set up in 2004 to establish clear ethical and ecological standards for producing palm oil, and its members include high-street names like Unilever, Cadbury’s, Nestlé and Tesco, as well as palm oil traders such as Cargill and ADM. Together, these companies represent 40 percent of global palm oil trade. But since then, forest destruction has continued. Many RSPO members are taking no steps to avoid the worst practices associated with the industry, such as large-scale forest clearance and taking land from local people without their consent.

On top of this, the RSPO actually risks creating the illusion of sustainable palm oil, justifying the expansion of the palm oil industry.

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through its subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Orangutan Dies Of Burns, Trauma Inflicted On Palm Plantation

Orangutans On Borneo, Sumatra Losing Habitat To Palm Oil Plantations

Indonesian villagers trying to smoke an orangutan out of a fruit tree where he was sheltering accidentally set him on fire. The distressed animal had been hiding in the leaves above the village of Lower Wajok in West Kalimantan, Indonesia, because its habitat had been disturbed, wildlife experts said.

Locals concerned that it would eat the fruit from the tree and destroying their crops tried to make it move on by lighting a fire under it on Sunday. However, as the video clearly shows, the orangutan was perched at the top of a palm tree (used for palm oil not a rambutan tree) and could not come down due to the fire below. As you will see on the video, the orangutan was scared and stressed. It did not survive the overall trauma.

palm oil deforestation

Orangutan conservation in Indonesia

dead orangutan

Orangutans killed for palm oil

orangutan extinction

orangutan in snare

 

orangutans killed on plam plantation

Orangutans on Borneo and Sumatra are losing habitat rapidly. As such, they are critically endangered. The rep ape is found only on these two large islands in Southeast Asia.

Read more and watch the video here http://bit.ly/PLYZY9 Action &

Travel Guide To Indonesia Promotes Conservation

Travel To Bali, Borneo, Java, Sumatra

Indonesia is an amazing country with ancient temples, beautiful beaches, hundreds of volcanoes, endangered wildlife, and abundant natural resources.

If you are planning a vacation or expedition to Bali, Java, Borneo or beyond, the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia is one of the best books available. It’s a comprehensive travel guide, which includes an Indonesian phrase and grammar book and a dictionary to help you learn Bahasa Indonesia.

Indonesia language and travel guide

Indonesia includes some of the largest and most exotic islands in the world, including Bali, Borneo, Java, Komodo, New Guinea, and Sumatra. There are more than 17,500 islands in all.  Indonesia shares two of its largest islands with other countries. The Indonesian state of Papua, formerly known as Irian Jaya, occupies the western half of New Guinea—the world’s second largest island.  Indonesia also controls part of the island of Borneo, which is the third-largest island in the world. Indonesia shares the island of Borneo with Brunei and Malaysia. Indonesia’s share of Borneo is called Kalimantan.

Indonesia deforestation and endangered species

In addition to these large islands, Indonesia controls all of Sumatra, which is the sixth-largest island in the world. Meanwhile, Sulawesi and Java rank as the 11th and 13th largest islands on the planet. Java is the most populous of the Indonesian islands—more than 60 percent of all Indonesians live here—and it is the most populated island in the world. Java is home to the capital city of Jakarta, where about 25 million people live. Despite the population density on Java, hundreds of other islands in the country are uninhabited.

Lombok tourism

Speak Indonesian To Open Hearts and Doors

The real beauty of Indonesia is found in the eyes and smiles of its people. Taking the time to learn some simple Indonesian words and phrases will help you unveil more of this country’s wonderful treasures.

Sumatra wildlife

Most Indonesians are happy, friendly, and curious people. They often will speak to you as you cross paths. They typically will ask where you are from and where you are going. When you have the opportunity, try to converse with locals. It can be educational, informative, and rewarding. Most Indonesian people know at least a few English words and are eager to learn more. Many Indonesians are very articulate in English, especially those involved in tourism, retail, and international business.

Gary Chandler

For more information, or to purchase a copy of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia by Gary R. Chandler please visit http://indonesiantravelbook.com/bali

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Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Learn To Speak Bahasa Indonesia

Pronunciation Key To Indonesian Language

This video tutorial from Gary R. Chandler, author of the Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia, will introduce you to the fundamentals of the Indonesian language (Bahasa Indonesia). Indonesia is one of the most amazing and diverse countries in the world.  It has ancient temples, beautiful beaches, hundreds of volcanoes, exotic wildlife, and abundant natural resources.

Indonesia includes some of the largest and most famous islands in the world, including Bali, Borneo, Java, Komodo, New Guinea, and Sumatra—more than 17,500 islands in all.

Indonesia deforestation and endangered species

The real beauty of Indonesia is found in the eyes and smiles of its people. Taking the time to learn some simple Indonesian words and phrases will help you unveil more of this country’s wonderful treasures. Most Indonesians are happy, friendly, and curious people. They often will speak to you as you cross paths. They typically will ask where you are from and where you are going. When you have the opportunity, try to converse with locals. It can be educational, informative, and rewarding. Most Indonesian people know at least a few English words and are eager to learn more. Many Indonesians are very articulate in English, especially those involved in tourism, retail, and international business.

Lombok tourism

This language and travel guide will help you get the most from your trip by guiding you to sites and towns to visit, activities to enjoy, and places to stay. It also will help you find the right Indonesian words to use at the right time. In addition to the book, we are launching a series of video tutorials to help you learn the most important words and how to pronounce the most important Indonesian words.

Sumatra Indonesia

For more information, please visit http://indonesiantravelbook.com/bali/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Learn To Speak Indonesian

Learn Bahasa Indonesia

Indonesia is a beautiful country full of natural and man-made wonders. It has ancient temples, beautiful beaches, hundreds of volcanoes, endangered wildlife, and abundant natural resources. This book will help you get the most from your trip by guiding you to sites and towns to visit, activities to enjoy, and places to stay. It also will help you find the right Indonesian words to use at the right time.

Indonesia language and travel guide

Indonesia includes some of the largest and most exotic islands in the world, including Bali, Borneo, Java, Komodo, New Guinea, and Sumatra. There are more than 17,500 islands in all.  Indonesia shares two of its largest islands with other countries. The Indonesian state of Papua, formerly known as Irian Jaya, occupies the western half of New Guinea—the world’s second largest island.  Indonesia also controls part of the island of Borneo, which is the third-largest island in the world. Indonesia shares the island of Borneo with Brunei and Malaysia. Indonesia’s share of Borneo is called Kalimantan.

In addition to these large islands, Indonesia controls all of Sumatra, which is the sixth-largest island in the world. Meanwhile, Sulawesi and Java rank as the 11th and 13th largest islands on the planet. Java is the most populous of the Indonesian island—more than 60 percent of all Indonesians live here—and it is the most populated island in the world. Java,is home to the capital city of Jakarta, where about 25 million people live. Despite the population density on Java, hundreds of other islands in the country are uninhabited.

The real beauty of Indonesia is found in the eyes and smiles of its people. Taking the time to learn some simple Indonesian words and phrases will help you unveil more of this country’s wonderful treasures. Most Indonesians are happy, friendly, and curious people. They often will speak to you as you cross paths. They typically will ask where you are from and where you are going. When you have the opportunity, try to converse with locals. It can be educational, informative, and rewarding. Most Indonesian people know at least a few English words and are eager to learn more. Many Indonesians are very articulate in English, especially those involved in tourism, retail, and international business.

Bali tourism attractions

Essential Words and Phrases

Greetings & Small Talk

Hello.  Halo. (HAH‑loh)

How are you?  Apa kabar? (AH‑pah KAH‑bahr)

(I’m) fine/good.  Baik/bagus. (BYE‑eek, BAH‑goos)

Good morning.  Selamat pagi. (SEH‑lah‑maht PAH‑gee)

Good day. (use this from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m.)  Selamat siang. (SEH-lah-MAHT SEE-ahng)

Good afternoon. (use from 3 p.m. until dark)  Selamat sore. (SEH-lah-MAHT SOHR-reh)

Good evening. (after dark)  Selamat malam (SEH-lah-MAHT MAH-lahm)

Good night.(use when going to bed)  Selamat tidur. (SEH-lah-MAHT TEE-door)

Good bye/good trip.  Selamat jalan. (SEH‑lah‑maht JAH-lahn)

Enjoy your meal.  Selamat makan. (SEH-lah-MAHT MAH-kahn)

Enjoy your drink  Selamat minum (SEH-lah-MAHT MEE-noom)

What is your name?  Siapa nama anda? (SEE‑ah‑pah NAH‑mah AHN‑dah)

My name is ______.  Nama saya ______. (NAH‑mah SYE‑ah ______)

Where are you from?  Dari mana? (DAH‑ree MAH‑nah)

(I’m) from ________.  Dari ______. (DAH‑ree _____)

Where (are you) going?  Ke mana? (keh MAH‑nah)

(I’m going) to ________.  Ke _____. (keh ______)

 Indonesia deforestation and endangered species

Appreciation, Courtesies and Respect

Excuse me, I need help.  Tolong tanya. (TOH‑lohng TAHN‑yah)

Excuse me.  Permisi. (PEHR-mee-SEE)

I’m sorry  ma’af/sori (MAH‑ahf, SOHR-ree)

please (help me)  minta (MEEN-tah)

please (help yourself)  silahkan (SEE-lah-KHAN)

thank you  terima kasih (TEH‑ree‑mah KAH‑see)

thank you (in Balinese)  matur suksma (MAH-toor SOOK-smah)

you are welcome  sama sama (SAH‑mah SAH‑mah)

you are welcome   terimah kasih kembali (TEHR‑ree‑mah KAH‑see KEHM‑bah‑lee)

you may  boleh (BOH-lay)

welcome  selamat datang (SEH-lah-MAHT DAH-tahng)

welcome (in Balinese)  om swasti astu (OHM SWAH-stee AH-stoo)

Until we meet again.  Sampei jumpa lagi. (SAHM-pye JOOM-pah LAH-gee)

 

People

baby  bayi (BAH‑yee)

child  anak (AH‑nahk)

family/relatives  famili (FAH‑mee‑lee)

father/Mr.  bapak (BAH-pahk)

friend  teman/kawan (TEH‑mahn, KAH‑wahn)

him/her  dia (DEE-ah)

husband  suami (SOO-ah-mee)

me  saya (SYE-ah)

man  pria (PREE‑ah)

mother/Mrs.  Ibu/bu (EE-boo). It is often shortened to bu  BOO)

Ms.  nona (NO-nah)

sir  tuan (TOO-ahn)

we  kita (KEE-tah)

wife  isteri (EES-tehr-ree)

woman  wanita (WAH‑nee‑tah)

you  anda/aku (AHN-dah, AH-koo)

Below are some of the key words and phrases that you will need frequently. Start a list of the words and questions that will meet your needs. The language is structured so simply that a single word can often be a sentence, question or a response.

Gary Chandler

Asking Questions

Asking questions is fun and challenging. First of all, you will need to structure questions differently in Indonesian than in English (refer back to the grammar chapter). Secondly, be braced for answers that you may not understand. However, here are the key words you need to start forming some questions:

who  siapa (SEE‑ah‑PAH)

where  mana (MAH‑nah)

when  kapan (KAH‑pahn)

why  kenapa (KEH‑nah‑pah)

what  apa (AH‑pah)

how  bagaimana (BAH‑gay‑MAH‑nah)

Sumatra Indonesia

Answering Questions

I only speak a little Indonesian.  Saya bisa bahasa Indonesia sedikit. (SYE-ah BEE-sah BAH-hah-sah EEN-doh-NEES-ee-ah SEH-dee-keet)

I don’t know.  Tidak tahu. (TEE-dahk TAH-hoo)

I don’t want it.  Tidak mau. (TEE-dahk MAH-oo)

later  nanti (NAHN-tee)

no  tidak (TEE‑dahk)

not yet  belum (BEH-loom)

OK  OK (OH‑kay)

yes  ya (yah)

Explore Sulawesi Indonesia

Other Helpful Words

address  alamat (AH‑lah‑MAHT)

age  umur (OO‑moor)

attention  perhatian (PEHR-hah-TEE-ahn)

book  buku (BOO‑koo)

careful  hati‑hati/awas (HAH‑tee HAH‑tee, AH-wahs)

closed  tutup (TOO‑toop)

country  negara (NEH‑gahr‑RAH)

map  peta (PEH‑tah)

marital status  kawin (KAH‑ween)

name  nama (NAH-mah)

occupation  pekerjaan (PEHK‑ehr‑jahn)

open  buka (BOO‑kah)

place of birth  tempat lahir (TEHM‑paht LAH‑eer)

religion  agama (AH‑gah‑MAH)

restroom/toilet  kamar kecil/toilet/W.C. (KAH‑mahr KEH‑cheel)

signature  tanda tangan (TAHN‑dah TAHN‑gahn)

word  kata (KAH-tah)

Gary R. Chandler

Useful Phrases

Food and Drink

I’m thirsty.  Saya haus.

I want/need a drink.  Saya mau minum.

I’m hungry.  Saya lapar.

I want/need some food.  Saya mau makan.

May I have one?  Boleh saya minta satu?

That’s all.  Ini saja.

 Where is a place to eat?  Rumah makan dimana?

 What is this?  Apa ini? 

I don’t want ice.  Tidak mau es.

Without ice!  Tanpa es!

One more.  Satu lagi.

Two more.  Dua lagi.

I’ve had enough. Thank you.  Sudah cukup. Terima kasih.

Money

Where is a bank?  Bank di mana?

 I want to exchange some American dollars.  Saya mau tukar uang dolar Amerika.

 How much does this cost?  Berapa harga ini?

Indonesian children smile

Hotel

I need a hotel. Where is one?  Saya mau hotel. Di mana?

 Where is my room?  Kamar saya di mana?

 May I have my room key?  Minta kunci kamar?

 Room number.  Nomar kamar.

Small Talk

I’m from America.  Saya dari Amerika.

 I don’t speak Indonesian, yet.  Belum bisa bahasa Indonesia.

 I only speak a little Indonesian.  Saya bisa bahasa Indonesia sedikit.

I’m just walking around.  Jalan‑jalan.

Are you married?  Anda kawin?

 Do you have children?  Berapa anak anda?

 Not yet.  Belum.

 Is there a person here who speaks English?  Ada orang di sini yang bicara bahasa Inggris?

Do you speak English?  Saudara bisa berbicara bahasa Inggris?

I do not understand.  Saya tidak mengerti.

Thank you.  Terima kasih.

 No (as in no way).   Tidak.

I can (am able).  Bisa.

Can’t do (it).   Tidak Bisa.

Do not do _______.  Tidak jangan ______.

Do not do that.  Angan begitu.

endangered orangutan

Time & Travel

What time is it now?  Jam berapa sekarang? 

When will it/they be ready?  Kapan selesai?

How many hours from Ubud to Kuta?  Dari Ubud ke Kuta berapa jam?

How many hours to Jakarta?  Berapa jam ke Jakarta?

I want to go to the hotel.  Saya mau pergi ke hotel.

I want to go to the airport.  Saya mau ke airport.

I want to go to the beach.  Saya mow ke pantai.

I want to go to _______.  Saya mau ke _______.

Where is the road to the beach?  Jalan ke pantai di mana?

Where is the road to the hotel?  Jalan ke hotel di mana?

Where is the road to ______?  Jalan ke ______ di mana?

Let’s go.  Ayo.

Shopping

Where is a pharmacy?  Apotik di mana?

 I want ______.  Saya mau _____.

I want to buy _______.  Saya mau beli _____.

(I) already have (that, one).  Sudah punya.

What time do they open?  Buka jam berapa?

I don’t want.  Tidak mau.

I’m just looking.  Lihat‑lihat saja.

Please wait a moment.  Tunggu sebentar.

May I see (it)?  Bisa lihat?

Can we bargain?  Bisa tawar?

Excuse me. Get in line. (Don’t cut in front of me.)  Ma’af, antrean!

How much does this cost?  Harga?

How much (is it)?  Berapa harganya?

For more information, or to purchase the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia, visit: http://indonesiantravelbook.com/bali/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Indonesia Travel Guide Promotes Wildlife Conservation

Gary R. Chandler, a public affairs and sustainability consultant, just published the second edition of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia (Hippocrene Books, New York, NY). Chandler will use the book to help this Indonesia develop more eco-tourism opportunities, which can help the local populations preserve the vanishing rainforest, while discouraging illegal wildlife poaching.

The new book offers travelers valuable insights and tips for a variety of activities, including jungle adventures, wildlife viewing, volcano treks, scuba diving, and the indulgence of Bali’s spas and resorts.  The new guidebook also includes a dictionary and phrasebook to help visitors communicate effectively with anyone.

Indonesia language and travel guide

Indonesia has some of the largest and most exotic islands in the world, including Bali, Borneo, Java, Komodo, New Guinea, and Sumatra—more than 17,500 islands in all.

With more than 210 million people, Indonesia is the fourth most-populous country in the world. These islands only represent one percent of the world’s land area, but they are home to more than 10 percent of all mammal species—more known mammal species than any other country. As a result of a growing human population, Indonesia now has more endangered mammals than any other country, including the orangutan, Javan rhinoceros, Komodo dragon, Sumatran tiger, and the Sumatran elephant.

Indonesia deforestation and endangered species

“Indonesia has some of the most amazing biodiversity in the world, but many ecosystems are under siege by the economic pressures of this rapidly growing nation,” Chandler said. “The country is doing its best to balance development and conservation, but it’s a challenge. If we can help this beautiful country expand its eco-tourism opportunities, it will help the locals support their families, while defending their ecosystems, which will benefit the country and the world.”

palm oil deforestation

Indonesia has some of the most extensive biodiversity on the planet, including the world’s second-largest rainforest. Unfortunately, this island nation is growing so fast that its natural wonders are collapsing— with the thousands of creatures that call these gems home.

Lombok tourism

Chandler, founder of Crossbow Communications a public relations, public affairs and issue management firm in Denver and Phoenix, hopes to use the book to inspire more people to visit Southeast Asia. He believes that more people must see these endangered species and their endangered habitats to help save Indonesia’s tigers, orangutans, elephants, rhinos and other endangered species. His new travel guide will generate funds to promote wildlife conservation, sustainable jobs, and sustainable forestry.

Sumatra Indonesia

To help draw global attention to the problem, while promoting more sustainable alternatives, Chandler is donating all of his profits from this publication to wildlife conservation organizations in Indonesia.

“This is a fascinating country that offers something for all travelers,” Chandler said. “You don’t have to be an adventure traveler to appreciate the beauty of Indonesia.”

For more information about the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia, visit www.indonesiantravelbook.com/bali

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Global Forestry Conference Averts Trade War

Tropical Timber and Forest Conservation

The relationship between economic development and environmental degradation became a high-profile issue in 1972, at the United Nations (UN) Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm. After contentious accusations and debates, the governing body proceeded to establish the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) to promote environmental protection.

palm oil deforestation

In 1983, the UN established the World Commission on Environment and Development to accelerate international cooperation. The new Commission developed an alarming report for the UN General Assembly in 1987, which sparked the creation of the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). UNCED scheduled the first Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, in 1992. International representatives, including many heads of state, convened and developed three key agreements:

  • Agenda 21, which began promoting sustainable development around the world;
  • The Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, which defined the rights and responsibilities of nations;
  • The Statement of Forest Principles, which outlined the sustainable management of forests worldwide. These non–binding principles defined the sustainable management of forests and generated the first global consensus on the issue.
  • palm oil deforestation

Saving Tropical Timber

After the Earth Summit, several European nations considered bans on all tropical timber and related products to curb rainforest destruction. In September 1992, Austria initiated a regulation that required labels on all tropical timber imports and it imposed a stiff import tariff of 70 percent on such products. Tropical-wood exporters, including Indonesia, protested Austria’s unilateral decision to create this misguided eco-labeling law. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) took their protest to the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) and the General Agreement on Tariff and Trade (GATT).

At the time, Malaysia and Indonesia were leading exporters of tropical timber. If Austria’s labeling campaign gained traction in other countries, these developing tropical nations would lose jobs and foreign capital. Meanwhile, some of the ASEAN Ministers claimed that developed nations covertly backed the campaign to promote temperate timber by creating trade barriers against tropical hardwoods.

The Global Forestry Conference

The Indonesian government and forestry producers were under siege. They scrambled to correct misinformation with facts and best practices.

Like most countries, Indonesia has seen the good, the bad and the ugly of natural resource development. Unfortunately, it’s success stories were suddenly overshadowed by its mistakes and the destructive acts of illegal loggers and slash-and-burn farmers. As the caretaker of the second-largest rainforest in the world, Indonesia deserved a place in the global debate.

Crossbow Communications saw an opportunity for Indonesia to create a showcase for the world. Our team suggested that Indonesia host a follow-up meeting to the Earth Summit to specifically discuss the Statement of Forest Principles developed in Rio. Thanks to support from top corners of Indonesian government and global sponsors, including the U.S. Forestry Service, Texaco, the Indonesian Cultural Foundation and the Indonesian Forestry Commission, Indonesia scheduled the Global Forestry Conference in Bandung, Java, in 1993—just eight months after the Earth Summit sparked the latest controversy around tropical timber products. Crossbow’s team helped develop and promote the program. We helped recruit panelists, attendees and media representatives from around the globe.

deforestation and endangered species

The Bandung Initiative

The Global Forestry Conference created an international showcase for Indonesia’s success stories, while isolating critical issues for discussion and prioritization. Government officials, industry leaders, academic experts and nongovernmental groups from both rich and poor nations participated.

After one week of strategic tours, presentations and one-on-one meetings, Indonesian officials and executives built hundreds of relationships with leaders and influencers from around the globe. The conference shaped new perceptions that had previously been formed in offices thousands of miles away. As a result, leaders crafted the Bandung Initiative for Global Partnership in Sustainable Forest Development. The Initiative called on world leaders, the Secretary General of the United Nations and other agencies to immediately strengthen global partnerships to advance sustainable forestry management.  It asked the UN to make forestry the highest priority. It urged all nations to manage forests with the same standards and to lift bans on most tropical timber. Meanwhile, Indonesia confirmed its commitment to ITTO and sustainable forestry.

The media entourage simultaneously generated hundreds of international media placements from the Forestry Conference. As hoped, news coverage was strong and very positive for Indonesia’s forestry practices and products, especially from Germany (a key influencer to Austria and Europe as a whole). The Conference positioned the Indonesian government and forest concessionaires as leaders and responsible partners in sustainable forestry. It helped emphasize the threat of illegal logging and slash-and-burn agriculture and promoted the need to combat those practices globally. Most importantly, Austria rescinded its misguided eco-labeling law and threats of a full-blown trade war ceased.

public relations firm USA

Crossbow Communications is a public affairs, public relations and issue management firm that specializes in natural resources, wildlife, food safety and health issues. The company has influenced public opinion and public policy around the world. Crossbow has offices in Denver, Colorado, Phoenix, Arizona and New York, New York. To learn more about our capabilities, visit http://crossbowcommunications.com/public-affairs-firm-phoenix/