Norway Killing Reindeer To Fight Chronic Wasting Disease

Plan Ignores Prions In Biosolids 

Norway and the greater Scandinavian region are experiencing some of the highest rates of neurodegenerative disease in the world. The human epidemic is fueling a related epidemic among wildlife. Norway will slaughter hundreds of reindeer to tackle a mere symptom of a bigger problem. Mismanagement is pouring fuel on the fire in Norway and North America.

As explained below, many forms of neurodegenerative disease are infectious and contagious. In fact, many are known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” Norway’s sick reindeer are canaries in a coal mine.

Norway CWD reindeer and moose

Prion Science

Studies confirm that people and animals dying of TSE contaminate the environment around them with deadly prions (PREE-on), which are in the urine, feces, blood, mucus and saliva of each victim. Victims are contagious long before they appear sick. Prions don’t die because they aren’t alive. Prions migrate, mutate, multiply and kill with unparalleled efficiency. That’s why Norway wants to kill hundreds of reindeer—to keep them from generating and spreading more infectious fluids. Meanwhile, Norway’s plan ignores the source of the prion problem—infectious waste from humans.

The infected bodily fluids from millions of humans have turned wastewater treatment plants into incubators and distributors of deadly prions. Since Norway dumps about 90 percent of its sewage sludge on open spaces, this infectious waste is fueling a public health disaster. Norway and most other countries are recycling an aggressive brain disease back into the food chain with every load of sewage sludge dumped on crops, parks and gardens. Millions of people are caught in the crossfire. So are reindeer and other mammals.

A prion is a deadly and unstoppable form of protein. Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing prions and prion disease. President Obama honored Prusiner with the National Medal of Science in 2010. Unfortunately, Prusiner’s science is being ignored and we’re facing a public health disaster because of the negligence and the mismanagement of infectious waste.

Alzheimer's disease and prion disease

Prusiner claims that all TSEs are caused by prions. He says that all TSEs are on the prion disease spectrum.Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is at the extreme end of the spectrum and is highly infectious. It’s often misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease, which is lower on the prion disease spectrum. Norway estimates that only half of its citizens with neurodegenerative disease are being diagnosed and even fewer are treated. It still scores as a top-five nation for Alzheimer’s disease. Diagnosed or not, many of these people are spreading prion disease in many ways.

Prion Disease In Deer

TSEs also include mad cow disease (BSE) in cattle and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no species barrier. Prions don’t discriminate.

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it included a provision to halt research on prions in all but two laboratories. It classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and more. It was a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, industry pressure convinced the Center For Disease Control to quietly take prions off the list of special agents a few years ago. Keeping prions listed threatened to outlaw several multi-billion dollar industries, including the biosolids and wastewater reclamation industries. This reversal kept the floodgates open to the prion threat. Especially regarding sewage, agriculture and water reclamation industries.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Because of prion dynamics, Canada declared CWD unstoppable. They’re right. Especially when we dump tons of infectious waste on farms, ranches, in forests and beyond every day. Other mammals are contracting the disease from humans and they proceed to infect each other through their own bodily fluids.

CWD has ravaged deer, elk and moose in many regions across North America since it was first identified at a Colorado State University research facility in the 1960s. Now, CWD is in Norway’s reindeer and moose, which blows holes in the theories and containment plans across North America. Suffice it to say, sick deer didn’t jump the Atlantic Ocean, which means that other prion pathways are at work. These sick mammals are a canary in the proverbial coal mine. Although there are several ways for CWD to take hold and spread, government and stakeholders are ignoring the biggest prion pathway in the world—human sewage.

Infectious Waste and Sewage Sludge

Human sewage in itself is a deadly cocktail, but wastewater treatment plants also receive tons of infectious waste from slaughterhouses, dental offices, clinics, hospitals, morgues, nursing homes, veterinarians and many other industrial sources. If it flushes, it’s in the waste stream. If it flushes, it’s being recycled on public and private land. Such thinking is recycling brain disease and contributing to the surge in autism.

land application sewage sludge

According to neuroscientist Laura Manuelidis, at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are wrong. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers, loved ones and entire communities. It’s drastically misdiagnosed and under-reported, which means that millions of highly infective people don’t even know that they have prion disease. Their caregivers don’t know it. Their families are not cautioned about transmissibility.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

Each victim becomes an incubator and a distributor of the Pandora-like pathogen. Victims are contaminating their homes and hospitals with prion. The human prion is resistant to both heat and chemicals. Prions released from humans are up to a hundred thousand times more difficult to deactivate than prions from most animals. Prions shed from humans are the most aggressive mutation, which is why prions in sewage are so devastating to wildlife and humans alike. Potent prions are contaminating entire sewage treatment systems and their by-products, including biosolids and reclaimed wastewater. The sewage sludge and wastewater released are spreading disease far and wide.

Wastewater treatment plants are collecting points for prions from infected humans. The sewage treatment process can’t stop these proteins, which means that they are serving as prion incubators and distributors. When released back into the environment, prions kill again.

Norway dumps 90 percent of its infectious sewage sludge on land—a practice that it has promoted aggressively since the 1970s. One-third of it is applied on parks, sporting fields and roadsides, while two-thirds of the waste is dumped on farms as a sick form of fertilizer—full of deadly prions, carcinogens, pharmaceuticals and more. Norway conducted a new risk assessment for the land application of biosolids in 2009 (Eriksen, et al.), but it failed to account for prion risks.

Prions become more aggressive as they work their way up the food chain and back and forth among humans. Prions released from humans in sewage are extra strength versions. Sick reindeer are the latest canary in the coal mine. Norway won’t solve the problem by killing the deer, but there will be fewer canaries to remind us all about the real problem caused by human sewage—in Norway and beyond.

Sludge Science

Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues again confirmed the presence of prions in urine. Soto also confirmed that plants absorb prions through the roots and become infectious and deadly to those who eat them. Therefore, humans, wildlife and livestock are vulnerable to prion disease via plants grown on land treated with sewage sludge and reclaimed wastewater water.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped. Most mammals don’t stand a chance.

prion research Joel Pedersen

“If prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said.

“Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the possible pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up (absorbed) by plants and vegetables.”

The problem with prions is that they linger in the environment infinitely because they defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. Unlike viruses or bacteria, prions are not alive. Therefore, they can’t be killed.

Thanks to sewage mismanagement, prion diseases are killing humans, wildlife and livestock around the world. As more people are contracting TSEs, sewage systems are more contaminated with prions than ever. Infectious waste is becoming more infectious every day. Infectious waste is not fertilizer.

biosolids land application and disease

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that prions are in sewage and that there has been no way to detect or stop them. As such, the EPA has never issued guidance on prion management within, or beyond, wastewater treatment plants. Unfortunately, the EPA’s risk assessment on sewage sludge and biosolids were prepared before the world of science knew about prions. The agency continues to cling to its antiquated sludge rule crafted back in the dark ages. It does, however, consider prions an “emerging contaminant of concern.” Meanwhile, its outdated risk assessments are promoting a public health disaster.

If it’s impossible to stop prions in an operating room, it’s impossible to stop them in the challenging environment of a high-volume, low-tech wastewater treatment facility. It’s ludicrous to think that treated sewage water or biosolids are prion-free when the last line of defense in the most sophisticated systems is a little hydrogen peroxide.

“Since it’s unlikely that the sewage treatment process can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” said the Toronto Department of Health, November 2004.

biosolids land application LASS

Sludge And Food Safety

Exposing crops and livestock to prions is a very bad idea. Plants absorb prions from the soil along with water and nutrient uptake, which makes the prions bioavailable and infectious to humans, wildlife and livestock via the food chain.

The prion problem is getting worse with rising populations, rising concentrations of people, more sick people, intensive agriculture, reckless sewage disposal policies, contaminated sewage treatment infrastructures and other mismanaged pathways. As the epidemic strikes more people, the pathways for prion exposure explode and intensify. Reckless sewage disposal policies and practices alone are putting billions of innocent people in the crossfire right now.

CWD In Norway

The modern practice of dumping sewage sludge on land has created a public health crisis around the globe. Autism and Alzheimer’s disease are just two of the symptoms. Chronic wasting disease mysteriously appeared in Norway’s reindeer last year. Instead of managing the real prion threat from sewage, the nation plans to exterminate more than 2,000 reindeer to eliminate the symptom of this environmental nightmare.

Norway’s first CWD case was detected after wildlife biologists working in the rugged mountains of Nordfjella found a sick young reindeer in March 2016. After its death, tests at the Norwegian Veterinary Institute (NVI) in Oslo pointed to CWD. International reference labs confirmed her diagnosis.

After the initial discovery, Norwegian officials began looking for other cases. A local hunter found two moose with CWD near the town of Selbu, 40 kilometers southeast of Trondheim, in May 2016. During last fall’s hunting season, thousands of hunters and other volunteers collected about 8,000 brain samples from all over the country, turning up two more cases of infected reindeer near Nordfjella. The cases in Nordfjella and Selbu are likely not linked, says Benestad, as the reindeer and moose have different types of prions.

“CWD in Norway’s reindeer and moose—the first cases in Europe—is a very serious situation for the environment and for our culture and traditions,” says Bjørnar Ytrehus, a veterinary researcher at the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research in Trondheim.

Last week, Norway’s minister of agriculture and food gave the green light for hunters to kill off the entire herd in which three infected individuals were found, about 2000 reindeer, or nearly 6 percent of the country’s wild population. “We have to take action now,” says Karen Johanne Baalsrud, director of plant and animal health at the Norwegian Food Safety Authority in Oslo. The deer’s habitat will be quarantined for at least 5 years to prevent reinfection, but water that runs off from this watershed will threaten all mammals, especially if sewage is still being dumped there. The odds of a successful eradication, experts say, will depend on the management of all prion pathways, especially those from humans.

Culling the entire herd would be “drastic,” the panel acknowledged, but should be attempted as soon as possible. The slaughter, to start in August, will be carried out by amateur hunters, who can eat the meat if prion tests come back negative. Professional sharpshooters will be used to find any elusive survivors. “We will do whatever it takes,” says Erik Lund, a senior wildlife adviser at the Norwegian Environment Agency in Trondheim.

Until the operation begins, wildlife rangers are patrolling to prevent animals from leaving or entering the herd’s 2000-square-kilometer habitat. The area is ringed by paved roads, which reindeer don’t like to cross, but if any do, the rangers have orders to track down and kill them. Repopulation won’t begin until at least 2022. Benestad says testing old feces may be a way to check whether prions lingering in the environment have degraded. Based on the prevalence in Nordfjella—estimated at 1%—Lund guesses that CWD may have been present for only 5 to 7 years, which could mean contamination is minimal.

“There’s a good chance they can solve the problem,” says wildlife ecologist Michael Samuel of the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Quick response has been shown to work before: In 2005, routine testing revealed CWD on two deer farms in western New York. Strict regulations prevented the disease from spreading. The state has seen no cases since.

It’s possible that CWD is elsewhere in Norway, the panel noted. The agencies will collect another 20,000 samples in the coming hunting season. They will continue testing wildlife for years to come. The European Food Safety Authority recommended that seven nearby countries begin testing programs.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Summary

Ironically, Norwegian officials admit how infectious the bodily fluids and excrements of the reindeer and moose are. But they don’t acknowledge the greater problem of infectious bodily fluids and excrements of humans who have prion disease. Sick deer, elk, moose and reindeer are further proof of the deadly and infectious nature of prion diseases in humans, including Alzheimer’s and CJD. Sick deer also are further proof of the infectious nature of sewage sludge (biosolids). Livestock are not immune.

The sick reindeer in Norway and the shortsighted plan to kill them speak volumes about the mismanagement of prion disease globally and in Norway. Government, industry and researchers alike are ignoring the human contribution to prion buildup in the environment. Infectious waste isn’t fertilizer. The risk assessments for such policies and practices are outdated and negligent, if not criminal. The global spike in brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s, autism and chronic wasting disease all spiked when governments around the world began endorsing and promoting the land application of sewage sludge.

  1. Norway has high rates of neurodegenerative disease;
  2. Norway has highly infected wastewater treatment systems because of the high rates of the disease in people;
  3. Reindeer and moose are getting brain disease from humans because Norway dumps 90 percent of its infectious waste on land;
  4. Norway will kill the reindeer to keep them from contaminating the land with deadly prions in their bodily fluids and feces; and
  5. Norway will ignore the problem posed by prions in human sewage and keep dumping this infectious waste across the nation.

Since humans are at the top of the food chain and downstream from these infected farms, ranches and forests, our food and water supplies are at risk of prion recycling (contamination). Wind and tornadoes transport the infectious waste even further. It’s time to end the land application of sewage sludge in the name of homeland defense and public health.

CWD News via http://crossbowcommunications.com/norway-killing-reindeer-to-curb-chronic-wasting-disease/

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Alzheimer’s An Infectious Disease

Alzheimer’s A Transmissible Disease

If you think that you and your family are immune to the surging epidemic of neurodegenerative disease, think again. Neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. It’s getting worse every day thanks to mismanagement and misinformation.

Infectious proteins known as prions are involved with most forms of neurodegenerative disease. Prion disease is known in neurology as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” The global epidemic has more to do with the prion contagion than age. In fact, it appears that the autism epidemic has more in common with Alzheimer’s disease than previously thought.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. Prusiner claims that all TSEs, including Alzheimer’s disease, are caused by prions.

Alzheimer's disease and prion disease

President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs are a spectrum disease. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, which is extremely aggressive and extremely transmissible, is at the extreme end of the spectrum. Unfortunately, Prusiner’s science is being ignored and we are facing a public health disaster because of the negligence.

Neurologists are just guessing when they make a diagnosis on the prion spectrum. If the patient exhibits memory problems, they are labeled with Alzheimer’s disease. If they have a movement disorder, they are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. If the person exhibits extreme symptoms of both, they are diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). It’s far from a science.

prion disease spectrum

According to neuroscientist Laura Manuelidis, at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are wrong. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones.

Neurologists don’t know where along the spectrum the disease becomes transmissible. The entire spectrum could represent a transmissible disease. Unfortunately, neurologists are not warning these patients and their caregivers about the risks of exposure. Even those with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are not quarantined. They are sent home, where they can infect friends, family, caregivers, clinics, dental offices, restaurants and entire communities.

“There has been a resurgence of this sort of thinking, because there is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study released in early 2016 by the same scientist adds to the stack of evidence.

Studies confirm that people and animals dying of prion disease contaminate the environment around them with prions because prions are in the urine, feces, blood, mucus and saliva of each victim. Each victim becomes an incubator and a distributor of the Pandora-like pathogen. Victims are contagious long before they exhibit clinical symptoms.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

At the personal level, this is very bad news for caregivers, especially spouses, who are 600 percent more likely to contract neurodegenerative disease from patients (Duke University and Utah State University). A cough, sneeze, utensils and drinking glasses all become lethal pathways. Once an item is contaminated, it’s impossible to sterilize. The human prion is resistant to both heat and chemicals. It’s reported that prions released from people are up to a hundred thousand times more difficult to deactivate than prions from most animals. Prions are not alive, so they can’t be killed.

Wastewater treatment plants are collecting points for prions from infected humans. The sewage treatment process can’t stop prions from migrating, mutating and multiplying before being discharged into the environment where they can kill again. The bad news is that the prions are being released back into the environment and dumped openly on land. The wastewater is being reclaimed and used for irrigating crops, parks, golf courses. It’s even being recycled as drinking water.

Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues confirmed the presence of prions in urine. Soto also confirmed that plants uptake prions and are infectious and deadly to those who consume the infected plants. Therefore, humans, wildlife and livestock are vulnerable to prion disease via plants grown on land treated with sewage sludge and reclaimed sewage water.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said.

prion research Joel Pedersen

“Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

Thanks to more and more people dying from TSEs, wastewater treatment systems are more contaminated with prions than ever. Wastewater treatment plants are now prion incubators and distributors. The prion problem is getting worse every day.

land application sewage sludge

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has confirmed that prions are in sewage and that there has been no way to detect them or stop them. As such, the EPA has never issued guidance on prion management within wastewater treatment plants. Unfortunately, the EPA’s risk assessment on sewage sludge and biosolids were prepared before the world of science knew about prions. The agency continues to cling to its antiquated sludge rule crafted back in the dark ages. It does, however, consider prions a “contaminant of emerging concern.” Meanwhile, its outdated risk assessments are promoting a public health disaster.

“Since it’s unlikely that the sewage treatment process can effectively deactivate prions, adopting measures to prevent the entry of prions into the sewer system is advisable,” — Toronto Department of Health, November 2004.

Exposing crops and livestock to prions is a very bad idea. Plants absorb prions from the soil along with water and nutrient uptake, which makes the prions even more bioavailable and infectious to humans, wildlife and livestock.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Unfortunately, the damage is real. Deer, elk, moose and reindeer are contracting an unstoppable prion disease now. In deer, the government calls prion disease chronic wasting disease. In cattle, prion disease is called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (they might as well call it what it is—transmissible spongiform encephalopathy). Mad cow disease is the term that most of us know. The government pretends that there is a specific prion responsible for each of these diseases. The fact is that there are thousands of mutations of prions spreading in the environment and food chain now. Some kill quickly, while some are less lethal. The only thing that we need to know is that a deadly prion is a deadly prion. Prions shed from humans are the most aggressive and the most deadly. There is no species barrier.

If prion disease is killing these animals, livestock are not immune. Beef and dairy cattle are consuming these infected crops and the infected water supplies, too. Since humans are at the top of the food chain, and since we are often downstream from these infected farms, ranches and forests, our food and water supplies are being compromised. Wind and tornadoes transport the infectious waste even further.

So, is Alzheimer’s disease transmissible? There is absolutely no evidence to the contrary. The truth is your best defense against neurodegenerative disease.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Preview and order the eBook now. Learn how to avert exposure to the Alzheimer’s disease contagion. Answers begin with the truth.

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Infectious Waste Spreading Alzheimer’s Disease

Prion Disease Surging Globally

Neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. Misinformation and mismanagement are contributing to the surge. Alzheimer’s disease alone is killing 50-100 million people now. Experts suggest that the prevalence will quadruple by 2050. It probably won’t take that long.

Death rates from heart disease and cancer are dropping globally due to advances in nutrition, medicine and disease management. Meanwhile, neurodegenerative disease is exploding. In the U.S., deaths from Alzheimer’s disease increased 71 percent from 2000 to 2013, while those attributed to heart disease decreased 14 percent. Similar trends are emerging around the world.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

  • Women are contracting neurodegenerative disease at twice the rate of men;
  • Spouses of those with neurodegenerative disease are 600% more likely to contract the disease; 
  • People in Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United States have the highest prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease. Rates in North Dakota, South Dakota and Washington rival the highest rates in the world; and
  • Caregivers are in harm’s way because of disease mismanagement; 

The epidemic is larger than anyone knows. Physicians are withholding millions of diagnoses from patients and their families. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, physicians in the U.S. only inform 45 percent of patients about their Alzheimer’s diagnosis. The same suppression is likely at work in most countries. Meanwhile, millions more go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

At a cost of $236 billion a year, Alzheimer’s disease is already the most expensive disease in the United States. The disease saw a 15.7 percent bump over 2014 numbers–the largest increase of all major causes of death. It accounted for at least 108,227 deaths in the U.S. alone in 2015. A similar pattern is emerging around the globe–some regions much more than others. In the U.S. alone, nearly one in every five Medicare dollars is spent on people with Alzheimer’s or another dementia. And these costs will only continue to increase as baby boomers age, soaring to more than $1 trillion in 2050.

In order to understand the threat, one must understand the dynamics of this neurological disease. Alzheimer’s disease, for example, is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

TSEs also include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in the deer family. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure.

prion disease epidemic

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion (PREE-on) disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins.”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

Experts claim that at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones. Millions of cases of deadly CJD are being misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death. The mismanagement doesn’t end here.

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and much more. Only two labs in the U.S. were allowed to handle them for research purposes. Unfortunately, the CDC quietly took prions off the list because the regulation criminalized entire industries and several reckless practices.

land application sewage sludge

Wastewater treatment plants, for example, are spreading this infectious waste far and wide because they are incapable of stopping prions. All by-products and discharges from wastewater treatment plants are infectious waste, which are contributing to the global epidemic of neurodegenerative disease among humans, wildlife and livestock. Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA and the industry trade organization—the Wastewater Effluent Federation. Sewage sludge (biosolids) and wastewater reclamation are causing widespread contamination.

Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies, wildlife, livestock and more.

Deer, elk, moose and reindeer are now contracting prion disease from humans. To help cloak the epidemic, it’s called chronic wasting disease (CWD). Deer with CWD are proverbial canaries in a coal mine. They are being killed by government sharpshooters to help cover up the problem. It’s insane.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

When cattle are exposed to prions, it’s being called mad cow disease or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, which is just a clever way of saying transmissible spongiform encephalopathy). Species barriers are a myth and part of the cover-up.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. If they can’t stop prions in the friendly and sterile confines of an operating room, they can’t stop them in the wastewater treatment plant.

The risk assessments prepared by the U.S. EPA for wastewater treatment and sewage sludge are flawed and current practices of recycling this infectious waste is fueling a public health disaster. Many risks are not addressed, including prions and radioactive waste. They don’t mention prions or radiation because there is no answer. Most nations are making the same mistake. We’re dumping killer proteins on crops, parks, golf courses, gardens, ski areas, school grounds and beyond. Wind, rain and irrigation spread these contaminants and many more throughout our communities and watersheds.

sewage treatment plant and disease

Failure to account for known risks is negligent. Crops for humans and livestock grown grown in sewage sludge absorb prions and become infectious. We’re all vulnerable to Alzheimer’s and other forms of prion disease right now due to widespread denial and mismanagement. It’s time to stop the land application of sewage sludge (LASS) in all nations. Safer alternatives exist.

Researchers have more questions than answers about brain disease, but we know that neurotoxins, head trauma and genetics can all trigger neurodegenerative disease. Unfortunately, that’s where our knowledge gets fuzzy. Most diagnoses are a process of elimination. After eliminating all other possibilities, the guesswork begins:

  • If the patient has a memory disorder, it’s Alzheimer’s disease.
  • If they have a movement disorder, it’s Parkinson’s disease.
  • If the patient shows both symptoms, flip a coin.
  • If they ever had a concussion, it’s possibly CTE.
  • If the person is incapacitated, it’s Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

Prion disease is a spectrum disease that varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. It affects most, if not all, mammals. Prion disease causes memory loss, impaired coordination, and abnormal movements. It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when, but both CJD and Alzheimer’s patients are being mismanaged. Informed neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risk of transmission. They are making diagnoses from across the room.

“CJD behaves like Alzheimer’s disease on steroids,” said Dr. Jennifer Majersik, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Utah.

Experts claim that at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. These misdiagnoses are actually CJD, which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones. Millions of cases of deadly CJD are being misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death. The mismanagement doesn’t end here.

Some foods increase your risk of contracting brain disease, while some foods help prevent it. Other foods offer the best hope for effective treatment. Most drugs offer no help at all. Drug companies are making billions selling placebos. Targeted nutrition is our best hope, but we also need to know which foods to avoid.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Preview and order the eBook now. Learn how to avert exposure to the Alzheimer’s disease contagion. Answers begin with the truth.

Read More About The Connection Between Biosolids, Wastewater Reclamation and Alzheimer’s Disease.

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Infectious Waste Spreading Brain Disease To Wildlife

Chronic Wasting Disease Caused By Dumping Of Infectious Waste

Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and other forms of neurodegenerative disease are collectively becoming the leading cause of death around the world. Brain disease also continues to expand in wildlife. Is there a connection?

Prions and Prusiner win Nobel Prize

Keep reading to find out why:

  • Alzheimer’s disease is an infectious prion disease;
  • Prion infectivity is in the bodily fluids of those with prion disease;
  • Wastewater treatment plants are spreading deadly prions via sewage sludge, biosolids and reclaimed wastewater.They also spread nuclear waste and toxic waste;
  • Wildlife are contracting prion disease from people because of this contamination. So are people. So are sea mammals.
  • Caregivers are in harm’s way because of widespread denial and mismanagement.
  • It’s time for several reforms. It’s time to reclassify biosolids and reclaimed wastewater as infectious waste. Prions are unstoppable. It’s time to enforce the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002.

The Brain Disease Epidemic

Alzheimer’s disease alone is killing 50-100 million people now. Millions more will contract the disease this year, while just as many will go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed.

transmissible spongiform encephalopathy

Thanks to misinformation and the mismanagement of infectious waste and bodily fluids, people of all ages are now exposed to an expanding spectrum of brain disease. So are other mammals.

The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, these brain diseases are part of the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is transmissible.

prion disease epidemic

Prion disease also includes chronic wasting disease among cervids (deer) and mad cow disease among cattle. It’s been found in dozens of mammals.

Pandora’s Lunchbox

Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Unfortunately, it appears that Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s are just as infectious as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The bodily fluids of people with prion disease are infectious. Prions are the X factor in the global epidemic.

biosolids land application disease

Prion disease is a spectrum disease that varies in severity. It also varies depending on which region of the brain is impacted first. It affects most, if not all, mammals. Prion disease causes memory loss, impaired coordination, and abnormal movements. Prions are an infectious form of glycoprotein that can propagate throughout the body. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease. TSEs also have the potential of being transmitted from humans to animals. The most common example is chronic wasting disease (CWD) among deer species.

CWD was first detected in deer in North America. Then it was detected in a variety of other animals, including an elephant at the Oakland zoo. It’s been found in a variety of animals across the United States and Canada. All hypotheses seem to center around contaminated feed and deer farmers. Then the deer spread the disease via nose-to-nose contact. Those theories were just rocked by the discovery of CWD in Norway in moose and reindeer. The disease didn’t jump the Atlantic from the Americas. However, Norway dumps tons of infectious waste on land every year–infectious waste from people with prion disease.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

It’s not known which patients with brain disease become infectious or when. The medical community prefers to ignore the topic. The legal industry is about to have a bonanza because negligence is the rule and not the exception regarding Alzheimer’s disease and the mismanagement of infectious waste. Savvy neurologists won’t touch patients with these symptoms because of the risks. Unfortunately, caregivers aren’t warned accordingly.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

Prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. The blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces of victims are infectious. Wastewater treatment doesn’t touch prions. In fact, these facilities are now helping incubate and distribute prions via solids and wastewater released. Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more.

biosolids land application and disease

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and much more. Unfortunately, the CDC quietly took prions off the list because the regulation criminalized entire industries and several reckless practices.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation.

Prions shed from humans are the most deadly. They demand more respect than radiation. They’re being ignored by regulators and industry alike. As such, food and water sources are being contaminated with the deadliest forms of prions. Municipal water systems can’t stop them from reaching water taps in millions of homes. Filtration doesn’t phase them.

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Scientists have shown that infected tissues can transmit prion disease between animals. There is no species barrier. A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence. There is no evidence that Alzheimer’s disease is not infectious.

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to prion disease, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. Sewage sludge and wastewater pumped out spread the disease.

The risk assessments prepared by the U.S. EPA for wastewater treatment and sewage sludge are flawed. Many risks are not addressed, including prions and radioactive waste. They don’t mention prions or radiation because there is no answer. Most nations are making the same mistake. Failure to account for known risks is negligent. Crops for humans and livestock grown grown in sewage sludge absorb prions and become infectious. We’re all vulnerable to Alzheimer’s and other forms of prion disease right now due to widespread denial and mismanagement.

land application sewage sludge

Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA. If sick deer are serving as a canary in a coal mine, what is this infectious sewage sludge doing to livestock and humans?

public relations and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the prion disease epidemic is one of our special areas of practice. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com. Stop prion disease.

Read More About Prion Disease at http://alzheimerdisease.tv/wildlife-contracting-brain-disease-from-humans/

Vancouver Spreading Infectious Biosolids Like Fertilizer

Sewage Sludge Contaminating Water Supplies

Residents of Canada’s Nicola Valley have said that something stinks about biosolids dumped near homes, rivers, aquifers and crops in their region. They set up roadblocks to stop the practice. A powerful new report backs them up.

John Werring, Senior Science Advisor with the environmental group, The Suzuki Foundation, recently came to the Nicola Valley where he met with some of the area Chiefs and with members of the Friends of the Nicola Valley Society. He listened to the concerns they raised about the land application of biosolids. He took samples from some of the biosolids which had been dumped in this beautiful alpine valley.

land application sewage sludge

Tests showed that the biosolids contained alarmingly high amounts of dangerous toxins. In fact, the “soils” tested indicate an area that could be classified as a “contaminated site” according to the BC Contaminated Sites Regulations guidelines.

The samples exceed the BC limits for contaminated sites under Schedules 4 and 7 of the BC Contaminated Sites Regulations on several parameters. The testing  shows that samples of biosolids taken from the Nicola Valley contained several dangerous toxins, including cadmium, uranium, lead, copper, mercury, tin, zinc, dichlorophenol, methylphenol, selenium, sodium, fecal coliform and much more.

Unfortunately, we also know that biosolids contain a deadly and unstoppable contagion known as a prion. Prions are associated with a global epidemic of neurological disease among people, wildlife and livestock. Prions are associated with Alzheimer’s disease, mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease, autism and other neurological maladies known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). The wastewater industry and governments prefer not to discuss prions or manage the killer proteins.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). As such, TSEs also are referred to as prion disease. The critical factor is that prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces carry deadly prions from victims. All tissue is infectious just because of the contact with the contaminated blood.

TSEs also include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in the deer family. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

prion disease epidemic

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

These findings support the local First Nations, and Friends of the Nicola Valley’s position that the practice of land application of biosolids is far too risky to be continued. In fact, once again, it makes one wonder how the practice ever gained approval in the first place. Sewage dumping poses a direct threat to First Nations’ traditional life-ways, and it threatens the health of all citizens within the Nicola Valley. It also threatens everyone downstream with exposure to toxins and neurological disease.

“The independent tests confirm that biosolids must not be applied to land,” said Chief Aaron Sam. “Biosolids contaminate our lands and waters, and it has serious potential negative effects on fish, animals and plants, First Nations people are reliant on the land for food and medicines. Biosolids put the health of our community members at risk. We can no longer sit back while the Government of British Columbia ignores our Constitutionally protected rights to our title and rights. Published, independent science concludes that land application of biosolids is very dangerous. We now have numbers to substantiate that, and these test results were determined by an independent lab. It is time to start looking at real alternatives to land application. The time of cheap, dangerous toxic dispersal throughout rural areas is over. Cities will have to find a greener, sustainable method of dealing with their toxins.”

biosolids land application and disease

The Biosolids Controversy, Coverup

The following information comes directly from minutes of Metro Vancouver’s Utilities Committee. It describes the biosolids controversy from the eyes of public servants in Vancouver. The minutes have been revised at least once, so let’s say the minutes are dated May 15, 2015. Public safety appears to be a non-issue. 

In November 2014, Metro Vancouver became aware of a controversial biosolids composting project situated in the Merritt area. Biosolids from Regional District of Central Okanagan were being sent to a biosolids composting facility operated by a company called BioCentral. A second BioCentral facility was slated to receive biosolids from Abbotsford upon approval of the Land Application Plan (a requirement of the Organic Matter Recycling Regulation).

A group calling themselves Friends of the Nicola Valley, led by a resident of a 44lot subdivision in close proximity to the second site, began to protest the operation in November 2014. This included conducting interviews, lobbying First Nations in the area, starting a petition and creating a Facebook site which opposes biosolids application in general, not just the BioCentral facility. Although Metro Vancouver projects have been identified on the Facebook site of Friends of the Nicola Valley, Metro Vancouver has not been the principal target to date.

Rey Creek Ranch

Rey Creek Ranch is a property northwest of Merritt that used Metro Vancouver’s biosolids for fertilization periodically from 1997 to 2014. Currently Metro Vancouver has a contract with Sperling Hansen Associates Inc. (SHA) to apply biosolids at Rey Creek Ranch in 2015 for hayfield, range and transitional forest land application. In late January, SHA received a letter from the Interior Health Authority, which allowed the project to proceed subject to notification of neighbors, including the adjacent Lower Nicola Indian Band. In response to this notification, SHA received a letter from the Lower Nicola Indian Band, referencing Tsilhqot’in v British Columbia 2014 SCC 44, the recent Supreme Court decision regarding Aboriginal Rights and Title. The letter stated that based on their current understanding of the practice of biosolids use they are strongly opposed to biosolids operations until a meaningful dialogue with the Crown and Ministry regulators could be completed to address their concerns, and threatening action for continued operation or new activities without consultation. Biosolids deliveries to Rey Creek Ranch were halted on January 26 with the hope that a meeting could be convened in short order and Lower Nicola Indian Band’s technical concerns could be addressed. No meeting has been scheduled by the Band to date.

Nicola Ranch

Nicola Ranch is a property just east of Merritt that used Metro Vancouver’s biosolids for fertilization from 19982005. At the Ranch Manager’s request, Metro Vancouver had scheduled biosolids to be delivered to the Ranch in January 2015 for hayfield fertilization. The parties have determined not to proceed with the delivery at this time.

Local First Nations

On December 12, 2014, the five Chiefs of the Nicola Valley (Nooaitch, Lower Nicola, Shackan, Coldwater, and Upper Nicola Indian Bands), wrote to the Ministry of Environment, demanding that all current biosolids applications cease until the Crown and ministry regulators establish a meaningful dialogue resulting in the five Chiefs’ support. On February 12, 2015, the Union of BC Indian Chiefs (UBCIC) Chiefs Council passed a resolution directing the UBCIC Executive to work with the First Nations Summit and the BC Assembly of First Nations to assist the Nicola Chiefs in halting applications of biosolids in the Nicola Valley, in particular the BioCentral composting site, and immediately call on the Provincial Government to develop a provincial strategy for dealing with biosolids including considering modification of current legislation and regulations.

On March 10, members of these five First Nations, in coordination with the Friends of the Nicola Valley, established a blockade on Highway 8 into Merritt, to stop trucks delivering biosolids from Regional District of Central Okanagan to the BioCentral facility.

Since the controversy began, the Friends of the Nicola Valley have been opposing biosolids use, and the response by BioCentral, the MOE and Interior Health Authority has been very limited and has failed to reassure the Merritt community of biosolids safety. As public confidence and support is critical for biosolids application projects and many of Metro Vancouver’s biosolids projects are located within the Thompson Nicola Regional District (TNRD), these events have the potential to significantly impact our program. Metro Vancouver has been dumping biosolids as a fertilizer throughout the province for 24 years.

Metro Vancouver has the ability to divert biosolids for disposal in Hinton, Alberta, at a higher hauling cost. If Metro Vancouver is unable to send biosolids to Rey Creek Ranch, Nicola Ranch, and OK Ranch in 2015, and is not able to find other comparable land application sites, the total additional cost to the program is estimated to be $1.6 M.

As the current situation has the potential to continue to escalate and impact other project sites, inability to continue with the biosolids beneficial use program could result in additional costs of up to $5M per year for the next 3 years.

Learn more about the perils of sewage mismanagement at http://crossbowcommunications.com/sewage-mismanagement-killing-millions-of-people-annually/

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the prion disease epidemic is one of our special areas of practice. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com. Stop prion disease.

Biosolids Causing Chronic Wasting Disease

CWD Spreading Through Sewage Sludge

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is ravaging wildlife in many regions across North America. It’s part of a larger epidemic of neurological disease that is killing millions of people, wildlife and livestock around the world. Once again, wildlife are serving as the proverbial canary in a coal mine.

CWD is part of an incurable spectrum disease called transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” Mismanagement of pathogens associated with the disease are contributing to a broader epidemic of neurological disease among wildlife, livestock and people.

chronic wasting disease

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). As such, TSEs also are referred to as prion disease. The critical factor is that prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces carry deadly prions from victims. All tissue is infectious just because of the contact with the contaminated blood.

TSEs also include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in the deer family. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

prion disease epidemic

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

Although there are many causes and pathways contributing to CWD and the prion disease epidemic, many pathways are being mismanaged around the globe. Thanks to infectious sewage, biosolids, reclaimed sewage water and feedlot waste, we’re recycling the prion pathogen that causes neurological disease right back into our watersheds, which we share with deer, elk, moose, livestock and other creatures that are vulnerable to prion disease. Rain, wind and irrigation spread deadly prions further everyday. Healthy wildlife are being exposed to deadly prions through food, water, air and contact with infected animals.

 

Since prions are in the bodily fluids of its victims, sewage mismanagement is a top concern. Wastewater treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA. Therefore, putting biosolids on crops and dumping sewage sludge throughout our watersheds is a very bad idea. Dumping sewage from billions of people on land and at sea creates deadly prion freeways.

Every sewage system in the world has been used by a person, if not millions of people, with Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Sewage systems have become prion incubators. Biosolids, wastewater reuse and sludge disposal have made them potent prion distributors. The waste from feedlots is likely contributing to the problem as well.

land application sewage sludge

Although there are multiple causes of prion disease, including CWD, reckless policies are contributing to an environmental nightmare. Sick deer, elk, moose and other wildlife and marine life are just a symptom of a much bigger problem. Putting these pandora-like pathogens back in the box is impossible.

Unfortunately, misinformation distributed by government agencies about the risks associated with chronic wasting disease are reckless, incompetent and criminally negligent at best. Claiming that there is no known risk associated with handling or consuming wildlife with CWD is laughable. Just look at the guidance issued regarding mad cow disease. Just look at the guidance issued to people with the most severe form of the disease–Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

The bodies of victims, regardless of species, are highly toxic and contagious. Hunting knives and saws used on sick wildlife are infected forever. Processing plants that cut and grind wildlife carcasses for hunters (before CWD tests are complete) are contaminated forever. Every animal processed after an infected carcass will become infected. Pickups and trailers that transport infected animals are hopelessly contaminated. The prion pathways created by one hunting trip can explode exponentially within hours.

wildlife disease

Hunters should just walk away from a carcass that looks suspicious and one should treat all game that looks healthy as suspicious, until proven otherwise. Hunters that kill and dress deer with CWD expose themselves and their families to prion disease in many ways thanks to misinformation from state and federal regulators.

It’s impossible to neutralize or stop prions in even the most sterile environments, including hospitals. It’s ludicrous to think that treated sewage water or biosolids are prion-free. Especially since prions from people are much more infectious than those found in other species (prions become more aggressive as they work their way up the food chain). It’s also ludicrous to think that game processing plants are prion-free. Regulations in this arena are criminal. Thousands, possibly millions, of innocent people have been exposed to the prions from someone else’s deer. That’s because many are processed before testing or no testing is done at all.

biosolids land application and disease

According to the U.S. EPA, “Prions are extremely resistant to inactivation by ultraviolet light, irradiation, boiling, dry heat, formaline, freezing, drying and changes in pH. Methods for inactivating prions in infected tissues or wastes include incineration at very high temperatures and alkaline hydrolysis.”

This applies to both the sewage plants that are contaminating our favorite hunting grounds it also has to do with game processing plants. It’s impossible to sterilize either once infected with prions.

The EPA National Water Research Compendium 2009-2014 lists prions eight times as an emerging contaminant of concern in sewage sludge (biosolids), water and manure. The EPA issued what it calls the “Sludge Rule,” which basically disclaims any responsibility for its risk assessments regarding biosolids. The EPA reserves the right to adjust these risk assessments, however, as the test of time disproves its pseudo-science.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infective in certain soils. Pedersen’s research also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage and its byproducts are dumped.

sewage treatment plant and disease

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.” (Now, we know that plants uptake prions, too.)

sewage treatment plant and disease

Read More at http://crossbowcommunications.com/sewage-mismanagement-killing-millions-of-people-annually/

public relations firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the prion disease epidemic is one of our special areas of practice. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Chronic Wasting Disease Spreads To Ohio

Brain Disease Spreading Through Sewage Sludge

The first case of chronic wasting disease in Ohio was confirmed Thursday from a single buck on a deer farm in Holmes County.

Erica Hawkins, spokeswoman for the Ohio Department of Agriculture, said the deer was found at World Class Whitetails in Millersburg. The deer farm has been under quarantine since April 24 because it acquired deer from an operation in Pennsylvania that tested positive for CWD this year.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

The farm was one of 43 captive-deer operations since April to be placed under quarantine for receiving about 125 deer from places in Pennsylvania that had the disease. More than 20 of the quarantines have since been lifted because the Ohio deer farm owners killed the deer in question and chronic wasting disease was not found. There is no way to test a live deer for the disease.

Farms under quarantine are not allowed to sell live animals or purchase any new ones — although deer can still breed, Hawkins said. The quarantine also does not prohibit the farms from allowing controlled hunts for the deer. All deer who die, whether from hunting or natural causes, are tested for the disease. Hawkins said since the quarantines have been in place, 770 deer have been tested from the captive operations and this case was the first one to test positive for the disease.

The state banned all deer imports from Pennsylvania, but that was largely lifted earlier this year. Now the state only bans importing deer from a five-county area in Pennsylvania where chronic wasting disease has been found.

Chronic wasting disease is among a family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, which includes mad cow disease. The diseases are caused by “misfolded” rogue proteins called prions. Prions cause normal protein molecules to mimic their twisted, misshapen form, creating spongelike holes in the brain, a process that can take years. The diseases are always fatal. The human strains of prion diseases cause severe dementia and brain deterioration ending in death. When deer develop symptoms from CWD, they become disoriented and emaciated, literally wasting away.

land application sewage sludge

Scientists suspect the primary way the disease is spread is nose-to-nose contact (actually, the largest prion pathway in the world is sewage sludge, also known as biosolids). The prions, which can be passed on in bodily fluids (from humans and other mammals), are so hardy that they also can bind to soil and remain infectious for years, researchers say. It’s believed that deer can contract the disease by feeding in contaminated areas and possibly by inhaling prions in dust. No human has ever been known to have been infected by the disease.

The disease has now been found in deer farms in 14 states, according to the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance. Critics of deer farms have said they are a perfect breeding ground for disease. Officials from the farm where the disease was found and theWhitetail Deer Farmers of Ohio could not be reached for comment Thursday afternoon.

It has also been found in wildlife in 18 states, according to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, but Hawkins said she is “absolutely” confident the state has contained the disease.

prion disease epidemic

House Bill 389 in 2012 transferred much of the regulatory power over deer farms from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to the Department of Agriculture. Hawkins said the law’s new licensing and record-keeping requirements allowed the state to contain a possible outbreak of the disease much quicker.

Scott Zody, chief of the state division of wildlife, said there is no reason to believe the chronic wasting disease has transferred to the state’s wild deer population.

“With hunting season in progress, there are no CWD concerns that should prevent anyone from enjoying wild deer hunting in Ohio or from consuming meat from healthy animals,” Zody said in a statement.

Source: http://www.bucyrustelegraphforum.com/story/sports/outdoors/2014/10/23/chronic-wasting-disease-found-ohio-deer-farm/17786995/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com. Only the truth about biosolids and infectious sewage sludge can stop chronic wasting disease.

Wolves Critical To Biodiversity

Wolf Conservation Critical To Healthy Ecosystems

Whether you believe in god, science or both, wolves are here for a reason. They and all species are part of the web of life, which supports us all. To think that wildlife and forests require “MAN-agement” is arrogant and ignorant. Ecosystems need to be protected from human encroachment so that they can continue to work for us.

wolf consevation

Thanks to the arrogance of humans, we now have an unstoppable epidemic changing ecosystems forever, That epidemic in wildlife is called chronic wasting disease. There is no species barrier. It can be transmitted to livestock–where it’s called mad cow disease. Livestock can spread it back to wildlife and on to humans. in humans it’s called Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. More than 44 million people in the world have these diseases now and it’s growing rapidly. The scientific name for this family of neurodegenerative disorders is Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is transmissible.

It’s an environmental nightmare because all of these victims contaminate their environment with a deadly protein called a prion. Prions are in urine, feces, blood and cell tissue. When wildlife contract the disease, they spread the disease to their herds with every breath and every step.

wolf California

Wolves are our best hope to minimize the spread of disease within these herds before it kills them all. Wolves can minimize the risk of spreading prion disease to beef and dairy cattle (listen up Wisconsin, Idaho and Wyoming). Wolves are the friends of hunters and ranchers. Quit playing god and let mother nature regain its balance. Our lives depend on predators.

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Chronic Wasting Disease Related To Alzheimer’s Disease

CWD Spread Through Sewage Sludge

A Colorado company says that hunters, landowners and many others are being misinformed about the dangers of chronic wasting disease. As such, public health and the health of entire water sheds are at risk.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is another form of prion disease. Prions also are behind the explosion in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). We also know prions because they are the causative agent behind mad cow disease. The scientific name for this family of neurodegenerative disorders is Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins.”

prion disease epidemic

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion (PREE-on) disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“The species barrier between these diseases is a myth,” said Gary Chandler, president of Crossbow Communications. “Prion disease is an environmental disease. It spreads in many ways and to stop it we need to reform many policies around the world.”

Although CWD spreads through many vectors, the greatest pathway is sewage sludge, also known as biosolids. The U.S. alone dumps more than 700 millions tons of this infectious waste on land–farms, ranches, forests, golf courses, parks and school grounds. Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. If they can’t stop prions in the friendly and sterile confines of an operating room, they can’t stop them in the wastewater treatment plant.

Deer, elk, moose and reindeer are now contracting prion disease from humans. To help cloak the epidemic, it’s called chronic wasting disease (CWD). Deer with CWD are proverbial canaries in a coal mine. They are being killed by government sharpshooters to help cover up the problem. It’s insane.

Chandler says that sewage disposal practices are contributing the the outbreak among wildlife. He says the same threat is viable for livestock. The practice of spreading sewage sludge (biosolids) on cropland and pastures makes prions available to grazing animals. It also puts prions in a position to contaminate water supplies when irrigation and rain rinse the biosolids into groundwater and surface water runoff. This water runs into creeks, ponds, streams, lakes, rivers, oceans and our drinking water. 

biosolids land application and disease

Reused wastewater for drinking is reckless. Prions are in the bodily fluids of its victims. Sewage plants can’t detect or stop prions.

The risk assessments prepared by the U.S. EPA for wastewater treatment and sewage sludge are flawed and current practices of recycling this infectious waste is fueling a public health disaster. Many risks are not addressed, including prions and radioactive waste. They don’t mention prions or radiation because there is no answer. Most nations are making the same mistake. We’re dumping killer proteins on crops, parks, golf courses, gardens, ski areas, school grounds and beyond. Wind, rain and irrigation spread these contaminants and many more throughout our communities and watersheds.

Failure to account for known risks is negligent. Crops for humans and livestock grown grown in sewage sludge absorb prions and become infectious. We’re all vulnerable to Alzheimer’s and other forms of prion disease right now due to widespread denial and mismanagement. It’s time to stop the land application of sewage sludge (LASS) in all nations. Safer alternatives exist.

Just ask the US EPA. Therefore, putting biosolids and recycling wastewater is more dangerous than injecting radiation into our watersheds. Radiation at least has a half life. With prions, it’s a question of how fast they double and triple their numbers. It’s safe to say that every sewage system in the world has been used by a person, if not millions, of people with Alzheimer’s and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

land application sewage sludge

Approximately 50 million people around the world already have Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. The threat is so severe that health officials expect the numbers of people living with the disease to triple soon. Unfortunately, neurodegenerative diseases among people of all ages are rising around the world. As these numbers rise, our sewage disposal will become more critical than ever because the further it spreads, the faster it will spread.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These deadly diseases are known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins. Victims permanently contaminate the world around them with their bodily fluids. Once contaminated with prions, items cannot be sterilized.

For more information, contact the experts at Crossbow. http://crossbowcommunications.com/public-affairs-firm-phoenix/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through its subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Chronic Wasting Disease Fueled By Sewage Sludge

Brain Diseases Linked By Prions

By Martha Rosenberg

It’s been over ten years since Wisconsin endured a kind of deer holocaust. The terminal deer and elk disease, chronic wasting disease (CWD), descended upon its deer population with such vengeance officials declared CWD eradication zones in which fauns and does would be killed before bucks.

Thousands of deer carcasses were stored in refrigerated trucks in La Crosse while their severed heads were tested for CWD. If the carcasses were disease-free they were safe to eat (really?); if not, they were too dangerous to even put in a landfill. Why? Because “prions” (which also cause mad cow disease, scrapie in sheep, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Alzheimer’s disease in humans) are not inactivated by cooking, heat, autoclaves, ammonia, bleach, hydrogen peroxide, alcohol, phenol, lye, formaldehyde, or radiation. They remain in the soil indefinitely. (They contaminate everything indefinitely.)

prion disease epidemic

Hunters in Wisconsin and other states were warned to wear surgical gloves when cutting up deer and to avoid exposing open cuts or sores on their hands. One hunter wrote the local paper after his buck tested positive for CWD — he was worried about the blood on his steering wheel and hunting clothes, which his wife handled.

There were also cross-contamination risks since deer processors do not usually sterilize their equipment after each deer. Food pantries in Wisconsin and their customers were warned about the risks and it became difficult to donate. (“If this meat is so safe why don’t you eat it?” the pantry patrons may have been thinking.)

land application sewage sludge

Department of Natural Resources (DNR) officials in Wisconsin and other states assured the public that deer meat was safe, even if it harbored CWD, as long as they avoided eating a deer’s brain, eyeballs, spinal cord, spleen and lymph nodes–the parts also implicated in mad cow disease. But scientific articles suggested most of the animal contained prions including its kidneys, pancreas, liver, muscle, blood, fat and saliva, antler velvet and birthing material.

Another reason to doubt DNR officials’ reassurances, calculated to keep their funding from hunting licenses flowing, is a 2002 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report from the CDC titled Fatal Degenerative Neurologic Illnesses in Men Who Participated in Wild Game Feasts —Wisconsin, 2002.

Many animal lovers have noted the hypocrisy of states citing deer “overpopulation” when they encourage deer breeding farms. What? Recently a four-part expose in the Indiana Star explores how “the pursuit of deer bred for enormous antlers and shot in hunting pens” on trophy farms is spreading CWD at an alarming rate. Deer breeding and “trophy farms” are a $4 billion a year industry and hotbeds of CWD thanks to their concentration of animals, “communicability window” (from trophy stock trading and escaped animals) and its unknown feed sources.

biosolids land application and disease

 

Like mad cow disease, widely believed to stem from the cost-cutting practice of feeding cows to cows, chronic wasting disease may also have man-made origins. In the mid-1960s, the Department of Wildlife ran a series of nutritional studies on wild deer and elk at the Foothills Wildlife Research Facility in Fort Collins, Colorado and soon after the studies began, however, Foothills deer and elk began dying from a mysterious disease. The CWD in the deer may have been caused by sheep held at the same facility which had scrapie, say researchers. (There are a few theories about the way that the disease arrived at CSU and spread outward from there. They all involve mismanagement of a biohazard that they completely underestimated.)

Since 2002, Wisconsin’s CWD eradication efforts have failed abysmally. The penned herd of 76 deer at Stan Hall farm has gone from one animal with CWD to 60 in five years writes outdoor reporter Patrick Durkin and in some areas, half of all deer now have the disease. “The world’s most ‘disturbing,’ ‘frightening’ and ‘unprecedented’ CWD case is growing next door to our capital and flagship university, and our government won’t crack a window to sniff it,” he writes.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Clearly using wildlife, which is held in trust by the state for the benefit of the public per the”Public Trust Doctrine”, to profiteer from hunters is unethical and harmful to animals. And despite DNR officials’ assurance, the spread of CWD may prove harmful to humans too.

Martha Rosenberg is an award-winning investigative pubic health reporter who covers the food, drug and gun industries. Her first book, Born With A Junk Food Deficiency: How Flaks, Quacks and Hacks Pimp The Public Health

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These deadly diseases are known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins. Victims permanently contaminate the world around them with their bodily fluids. Once contaminated with prions, items cannot be sterilized.

Source: http://www.opednews.com/articles/Mad-Cow-like-Disease-Growi-by-Martha-Rosenberg-Cows_Deer_Disease_Disease-Virus-Epidemics-140601-640.html

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Chronic Wasting Disease Spreads To Iowa

Editor’s Note: As predicted, chronic wasting disease will continue spreading throughout North America. The disease is spreading for many reasons, but the National Animal Disease Center (NADC) in Ames, Iowa may have created an additional vector for the disease to spread in that state. CWD has been transmitted to cattle in lab settings. Given the proven risk, will Iowa’s farmers and ranchers demand the truth and accountability? Will they demand an end to spreading biosolids on their crops because of proven prion risks (the unstoppable pathogen behind CWD, mad cow disease, Alzheimer’s, CJD, scrapie and other neurodegenerative disorders). Their lives and livelihoods might depend on it. 

Will Cattle Industry Admit Prion Threat To Livestock

The first case of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in a wild Iowa deer has been confirmed. The deer was reported as harvested in Allamakee County during the first shotgun season in early December. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources is working to obtain as much information as possible about the infected deer to implement its CWD response plan.

chronic wasting disease research at CSU
Sick deer infect their environment, including soil and water. Prions migrate, mutate and multiply, which means that the threat to livestock and humans from multiple pathways is real. Iowa has a chance to be the leader in CWD management versus the mismanagement taking place elsewhere.

“We have been testing for CWD in Iowa’s deer herd for more than a decade and are optimistic, given the extensive data we have collected, that we have caught this early,” said Chuck Gipp, DNR director.

“The next step will be to focus our monitoring efforts in the area where the animal was harvested and work closely with local landowners and hunters to gather more information,” Gipp said.

CWD is a neurological disease affecting primarily deer and elk. It is caused by an abnormal protein, called a prion, that attacks the brains of infected animals, causing them to lose weight, display abnormal behavior and lose bodily functions.

Signs include excessive salivation, thirst and urination, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, listlessness and drooping ears and head.

The only reliable test for CWD requires testing of lymph nodes or brain material.

There is no evidence that humans can contract CWD by eating venison. However, the National Institute of Health and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that hunters do not eat the brain, eyeballs or spinal cord of deer and that hunters wear protective gloves while field dressing game and boning out meat for consumption.

Prior to the positive detection in Iowa, CWD had been detected in every bordering state.

“With CWD in all the states around us, we have understood the possibility of a positive detection in the wild deer herd for some time” Gipp said.

Since 2002, the DNR has collected more than 650 samples of deer from within a five-mile radius of where the deer is believed to have been harvested.

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These deadly diseases are known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins. Victims permanently contaminate the world around them with their bodily fluids. Once contaminated with prions, items cannot be sterilized.

Source: http://globegazette.com/features/cwd-detected-in-iowa-wild-deer-herd-for-first-time/article_c8484328-a1fa-5640-99bc-6d57aba24ad6.html

Chronic Wasting Disease Near Yellowstone National Park

Environmental Nightmare Unstoppable

Elk winter feed grounds in western Wyoming should be phased out to curb the potential spread of Chronic Wasting Disease (prion disease) in elk. That is what Lloyd Dorsey of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition in Jackson recommends, using information he gathered from Wyoming Game & Fish Department reports.

Chronic wasting disease, or CWD, has been detected 40 miles from Yellowstone National Park and 45 miles from winter elk feedgrounds, according to a coalition map. Chronic wasting disease is a fatal disease of the central nervous system of deer, Rocky Mountain elk and (rarely) moose, according to the Game & Fish.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

The 2012 department information reveals the farthest western advance of CWD positive deer in Wyoming, yet.

The disease occurs at a higher rate in deer areas than elk areas. Chronic wasting disease might arrive in feed grounds, but it hasn’t so far, and they can’t predict whether it will, said Game & Fish information specialist Al Langston in Cheyenne. But other experts sounded a warning.

“Finally, our results demonstrate that high-density elk populations (10 to 100 elk per kilometer squared) can support relatively high rates of CWD (.10 percent prevalence) that may substantially affect the dynamics of such populations,” stated an 2013 article by Ryan J. Monello and associates in “The Journal of Wildlife Diseases.”

“The good news is that the disease has not been detected at the feedgrounds or national parks yet,” said Bruce Smith, a retired U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist and former biologist at the National Elk Refuge in Jackson. “Managers can still act to responsibly phase out winter feeding of elk and limit the effects of this and other diseases.”

Game & Fish staffers search for the disease by collecting and analyzing wild ungulate lymph nodes, mostly from animals harvested by hunters. Testing is very reliable using lymph nodes. Analyzing live animal samples is not as accurate, Langston said.

land application sewage sludge

A total of 2,017 deer, elk and moose samples were examined in 2012. Of those samples, 98 tested positive for CWD, including 78 mule deer, six white-tailed deer and 14 elk. New cases of the disease were diagnosed in deer hunt areas 132 (west of Flaming Gorge) and 157 (east of Pavillion) as well as elk hunt area 10 (west of Laramie).

These hunt areas all are bordered by known positive areas or states and are most likely natural extensions of the endemic area, according to a Game & Fish 2013 CWD report.

The state’s only CWD-positive elk are in southeastern Wyoming, but CWD-positive deer do occupy the Big Horn Basin, according to a Game & Fish 2012 map.

No elk harvested in western Wyoming tested positive last year. If those elk had not been killed by hunters, they would have wintered in the feedgrounds, Langston said.

chronic wasting disease and moose

A total of 3,273 deer, elk and moose samples were analyzed in 2011. Of those samples, 109 tested positive for CWD, representing 81 mule deer, 16 white-tailed deer and 12 elk. One new case of the disease was diagnosed in deer hunt area 165 (north of Meeteetse). Area 165 is bordered by known positive areas and likely a natural extension of the endemic area, said a 2012 Game & Fish report.

“Rocky Mountain elk do very well without feedgrounds, for the most part,” Dorsey said.

For example, in the Gros Ventre area there are three feedgrounds, but there also is good winter range. Conflicts could be mitigated.

“We’d be happy to help find resources to build elk-proof fences to help keep elk separate from cattle and horses during winter and spring, and prevent inter-species transmission of brucellosis,” Dorsey said.

About 80 percent of the elk in seven herd units comprising west-central Wyoming use the feedgrounds. Although nobody knows how many, there would be fewer elk without feedgrounds, said Brandon Scurlock, a Game & Fish brucellosis program supervisor in Pinedale.

Typically, the units are at or over population objectives, Dorsey said. As examples, the Jackson herd objective is 11,000 elk. The 2012 estimate was 11,051. The Fall Creek herd objective is 4,400. The 2012 estimate was 4,500. There are 23 feed grounds in western Wyoming. Of those, 22 are managed by the state and one, the National Elk Refuge in Jackson, is run by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Brucellosis is endemic in elk populations that visit elk feedgrounds in western Wyoming. It also is found in some elk herds that do not attend elk feedgrounds, but typically at a lower rate, Dorsey said.

Now is the time to phase out the feed grounds before a CWD epidemic occurs in those areas, Dorsey said.

CWD News via http://www.powelltribune.com/news/item/11215-analyst-closing-elk-feedgrounds-will-curb-cwd

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.