Wastewater Reclamation Based On Flawed Risk Assessments

Alzheimer’s Disease Fueled By Infectious Waste

Neurodegenerative diseases are the fastest-growing causes of death around the world. The mismanagement of infectious waste is contributing to the epidemic.

Dr. Stanley Prusiner earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for his pioneering research on deadly prions—an infectious form of protein that connects a deadly spectrum disease called transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his work. Unfortunately, this groundbreaking research is being ignored. This negligence is fueling a public health disaster around the world, as critical prion pathways are being ignored and mismanaged.

wastewater treatment plants and prion disease

In June 2012, Prusiner confirmed that Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and even ALS are prion diseases similar, if not identical, to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The primary difference being which part of the brain the disease attacks first. The other variable is that there are now an unknown number of prion mutations.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

Mutations of these deadly prions also are the common denominator between human forms of the disease, mad cow disease in livestock and chronic wasting disease in wildlife. Several other species of mammals, including sea mammals, also are victims of the unstoppable epidemic. Much of the carnage is being swept under the rug as the problem escalates.

Although there are many causes contributing to prion disease, many people and animals are contracting it from environmental exposure (food, water and soil) and then contaminating the environment even more with their own bodily fluids. Victims of prion disease are walking time bombs. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most deadly form of prion disease in humans. Without dispute, it is a very contagious disease that kills rapidly. There is no cure for CJD.

Alzheimer’s and CJD are often indistinguishable to neurologists and general practitioners. Misdiagnoses are common. It appears that CJD is caused by a more aggressive mutation of prion than Alzheimer’s, but a deadly prion is a deadly prion. There is no reason to believe that some prions behave differently than others in disease transmission and progression. There should be no difference in disease management.

Unfortunately, as more people contract these brain diseases, the more deadly wastewater streams become. Meanwhile, wastewater reuse is surging around the world in response to growing populations and dwindling water resources. Other by-products from the wastewater stream known as biosolids (sewage sludge) also are being used to fertilize crops, pastures for livestock, golf courses, playgrounds and gardens. Millions of people, including your family, are in harm’s way because wastewater treatment plants can’t stop prions. Regulators and industry are playing dumb as the body count keeps rising. It’s a deadly circle enabled by an outdated risk assessment. Modern science is being ignored.

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped.

prion research Joel Pedersen

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage

sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

land application sewage sludge

The largest prion pathway in the world is wastewater (infectious waste) from homes, hospitals, nursing homes, slaughterhouses, dental offices and other high-risk sources. The problem is that prions are in all bodily fluids and cell tissue of millions of victims who often go undiagnosed.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

Their mucus, saliva, feces, and urine are flushed down millions of toilets and rinsed down sinks every day. Once inside the wastewater system, prions proceed to migrate, mutate and multiply. Reckless risk assessments enable wastewater treatment plants to spread these deadly agents far and wide. Deadly prions are building up and incubating in sewage treatment plants and then dumped openly on land. They are swept into the air by the wind. Now, water contaminated by prions is migrating into our rivers, lakes and oceans. It’s being injected into groundwater and it’s being recycled as tap water.

biosolids land application and disease

I used to support wastewater reclamation and reuse projects until I realized that the risk assessments were prepared decades ago—before Dr. Prusiner characterized prions and prion disease. These microscopic protein particles have converted sewage and its by-products a public health disaster.

Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology and director of the George and Cynthia W. Mitchell Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Brain Related Illnesses at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues are the latest to find prions in urine. The study appeared in the August 7, 2014 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Recent studies are confirming the presence of prions in blood. The U.S. EPA and other regulatory bodies around the world are ignoring these risks.

“This is the first time that prions have been detected in human urine,” Dr. Soto told Neurology Today.

Soto failed to reference urine and blood studies performed earlier by Ruth Gabizon in 2001 and Reichl in 2002, which also detected deadly prions in bodily fluids.

sewage treatment plant and infectious waste

Wastewater Reclamation Hazards

As many hospitals have learned the hard way, deadly prions are unstoppable in the sterile confines of an operating room that has been exposed to someone with prion disease. Prions are totally unaccounted for in the high-volume streams at wastewater treatment plants. Prions migrate, mutate and multiply as they move through the environment and up the food chain. Prions from humans are the most aggressive and deadly. Wastewater treatment plants have been prion incubators and distributors for decades. The victims no longer fit under the rug of deceit.

Sewage treatment plants and their discharges are permanently infected. Once a prion reaches the soil, the soil is permanently contaminated and the entire watershed below that point is at risk forever. If your food and water is generated in that watershed, you and your family are exposed. We can’t afford to further contaminate entire watersheds – increasing the pathway to humans, livestock, and wildlife downstream.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Read the full story about the hidden hazards associated with wastewater reclamation and reuse at http://crossbowcommunications.com/wastewater-reclamation-reuse-based-on-outdated-risk-assessments/

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the prion disease epidemic is one of our special areas of practice. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com. Stop prion disease.

Denying Climate Change Is Like Denying Gravity

Global Warming Driving Extreme Weather

When people, organizations and corporations oppose efforts to reduce global warming and climate change, what are they actually fighting for? An energy policy that depends on hostile, foreign regimes? Energy policies that promote waste and inefficiency? Dirty energy and air pollution? Domestic exploration and development that contaminates dwindling water supplies? Short-sighted energy and transportation policies that grease the wheels of corporate greed?

air pollution China

If we let deadly carbon dioxide build up in our homes, it kills us. If we let carbon dioxide build up in our atmosphere it’s just as toxic, but slightly more diluted–with the compounding effects of trapping heat in the limited confines of our atmosphere.

air pollution in China

We should fight deadly carbon gases just because of their toxic nature, let alone the potential to add to global warming and the more visible effects of climate change.

Unfortunately, some scientists have erred in their methodology and their politics. Just like the experts on the other side of the debate, they are not above stupidity. Extreme weather events and trends may not be conclusive proof for some people, but who can deny that air pollution, carbon buildup and deforestation are bad ideas for multiple reasons.

Indeed, the evidence of climate change is piling up in the form of extreme weather events in different places, extreme temperatures, droughts, floods and rising tides–depending where you might reside. The toxins in our air, water and bodies are piling up, too.

sustainable cities network

If we can’t rally to fight society’s contribution to climate change trends, then fight air and water pollution, deforestation, waste, greed, corruption and ignorance. The result will be a healthier and more sustainable future for all of god’s creations–especially your children and grandchildren.

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting sustainable, resilient and livable cities. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Sustainable Cities Worth Investment

Sustainable, Resilient, Healthy Cities

Sustainable cities are one key to a sustainable world. Eco-entrepreneur Gary Chandler is leading the development of a new program that will promote efficiency and resiliency in cities and communities around the world.

sustainable cities network

Chandler says that a sustainable future requires more sustainable, efficient and resilient cities. To help facilitate solutions, Chandler’s companies, Crossbow Communications and Earth News, are launching the Greener Cities program–a multidimensional online portal and a powerful awards program for cities and communities around the world.

Cities around the globe are home to approximately 50 percent of the world’s population and they generate 80 percent of our planet’s greenhouse gases. As severe weather seems to be more frequent and more extreme, many communities are bracing for the increasing threats of fires, droughts, floods, severe weather, population displacement, and others. Community leaders and citizens everywhere must be informed, motivated and empowered to be part of the solution.

“Cities must take responsibility for our contributions to global climate change,” says former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

public relations strategy

Unfortunately, few local communities have the ability to engage their citizens to develop a common vision around this issue. Some need guidance on a collaborative process to achieve consensus. Others need help outlining the range of possibilities that they can consider to cut pollution, save energy, conserve water and promote health and sustainability. Many communities already are in contingency mode and need help mitigating and weathering the impacts of climate change on their homes and businesses. Resiliency is becoming the new buzzword.

Many community leaders need coaching to bring all stakeholder groups to the table to discuss opportunities, threats, resources, and priorities. As communities begin planning, they need comprehensive guidance regarding the full range of possible actions to consider in their plans. Many communities are limiting their sustainability visions to the energy efficiency of city buildings and vehicle fleets. They need to learn from other cities that have embraced a broader spectrum of possible actions such as investments, tax policies, water use, tree management, open space, expanded recycling efforts, and many others.

“Recognition programs can help expedite action and encourage cities around the world to  learn from each other,” said Gary Chandler, president of Crossbow. “This will be the most powerful awards program in the world for sustainable cities.”

Background: For more information about sustainable and resilient cities, please visit http://greenercities.org/sustainable-cities-best-practices/ Please submit your best practices, case studies, and other resources that can help communities and businesses around the world learn from your experiences.

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs.  It’s also promoting sustainable, resilient and livable cities. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.

Resilience and Sustainability Network Launched For Cities

Sustainable Cities Can Help Fight Climate Change

To help address the impacts of cities on climate change and the impact of climate change on cities, we are developing the sustainability network to accelerate the movement of cities and communities toward efficiency and resiliency. With your help, this prestigious annual award will be the richest and most comprehensive awards program in the world for sustainability.

sustainable cities

In addition, the high-profile awards program will help drive the most comprehensive information portal in the world to promote sustainable cities, while helping them avoid roadblocks and pitfalls that waste time and scarce resources. Although there are some impressive award programs and information portals for sustainability, none has the breadth and depth that we envision to expedite the process and maximize the impact of the sustainable city movement.

As sustainability experts know, cities around the world are home to about 50 percent of the world’s population and they generate approximately 80 percent of our planet’s greenhouse gases – the primary human contributor to climate change. Meanwhile, many communities are managing the increasing threats of fires, droughts, floods, severe weather, population displacement, and others. Community leaders and citizens around the world must be informed, motivated and empowered to become part of the solution and to be more resilient in the process.

“Cities must take responsibility for our contributions to global climate change,” said former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

The Sustainability Challenge Facing Cities

Unfortunately, few local communities have the ability to engage their citizens in developing a common vision around this issue. Some need guidance on citizen engagement and a collaborative process to achieve consensus. Others need help outlining the entire spectrum of actions that they can take to cut pollution, save energy, conserve water and promote health and sustainability. Other communities around the world already are in contingency mode and need help mitigating the impacts of climate change on their homes and businesses.

Many community leaders need coaching to bring all stakeholder groups to the table to discuss opportunities, threats, resources, and priorities. As communities begin planning, they need comprehensive guidance regarding the full range of possible actions to consider in their plans. Many communities are limiting their sustainability visions to the energy efficiency of city buildings and vehicle fleets. They need to learn from other cities that have embraced a broader spectrum of possible actions such as investments, tax policies, water management, tree management, open space, expanded recycling efforts, and many others.

reforestation a climate change solution

Civic leaders need guidance and resources to engage all stakeholders. They need role models, case studies, networks, mentors, financial assistance, and incentives to help them exchange experiences and resources. These resources and processes can help minimize civic gridlock and promote rapid change.

The results of a recent survey conducted by the International City/County Management Association (ICMA), the first of its kind, measures how and to what extent local governments are acting to promote sustainability. It indicates that most city leaders need help on many levels to develop successful sustainability plans.

“Sustainability has emerged as a major public policy issue facing countries throughout the world,” writes James H. Svara, Director of the Center for Urban Innovation and Professor in the School of Public Affairs. “Sustainability requires a broad range of actions that must include contributions from all levels of government, from all sectors of the economy, and from all of the citizenry. City and county governments are uniquely positioned to make a significant contribution to the effort. They are directly involved in providing or regulating many of the human activities that affect resource use, promote economic development, and affect the protection and inclusion of persons from all economic levels and racial and ethnic groups.”

Overall, the responses to the ICMA survey demonstrate two opposing tendencies:

  1. Most local governments are becoming active in sustainability, but most governments are involved at a relatively low level and most of the possible sustainability actions are not being widely utilized.
  2. Most governments lack goals, targets, or specific plans. Only a quarter of local governments have citizen committees and staff dedicated to sustainability, and only one in six has a separate budget to promote sustainability although local governments are spending money on specific actions.

Although the motivation for local action is on the rise, most communities still lack the direction and framework for quick and effective visioning and planning on sustainability. They need guidance to develop and undertake comprehensive and collaborative planning that can make a difference. Although the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement and other programs are taking steps in the right direction, they are limited in scope and fail to offer comprehensive guidance, including collaborative planning that specifically embraces citizen engagement and empowerment.

media relations and public relations

Communities need a toolkit of resources and a template that can guide localized efforts to overcome possible political gridlock. Local leaders need the guidance and tools necessary to educate, inspire, and manage stakeholder input from all segments of their communities. They need to form a collective brain trust for communities around the globe. In addition, many civic leaders need funding to assist with planning and implementation. The Greener Cities program also can help facilitate funding for some initiatives through Clean Development Mechanisms (CDM) and carbon offsets to finance some of the projects.

“Where national governments can’t or won’t lead, cities will,” said former Toronto Mayor David Miller.

Please join us as a founder in this important program. We can’t do it without the brightest minds in the world. For more information, please visit http://greenercities.org/sustainable-cities-best-practices/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting sustainable, resilient and livable cities. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.