Alzheimer’s Epidemic Spreading In All Countries

Caregivers At Risk Of Infection From Alzheimer’s Disease Patients 

Approximately 40 million people around the world already have Alzheimer’s disease and the numbers are rising rapidly. Since the disease barely existed a century ago, Alzheimer’s disease and several related diseases fit the definition of a global epidemic.

My new book explains why Alzheimer’s disease is contagious in many, if not all, cases. It explores why some regions of the world have death rates that are off the charts. It breaks down the causes and offers advice to protect you and your family.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

Alzheimer’s deaths in the U.S. alone increased 68 percent between 2000 and 2010. During that same time, deaths from other major diseases, including heart disease and cancer, decreased significantly. Most developed countries are making progress on all health fronts, except for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

This book explores Alzheimer’s disease as part of a protein epidemic. It makes several critical points and asks some challenging questions about a form of killer protein known as a “prion” (pronounced PREE-on).

Deadly prions are contagious and unstoppable. They are definitely behind some forms of neurodegenerative disorders in mammals, including humans. A Nobel-Prize-winning scientist claims that Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases all are prion diseases. In addition, prions are behind a deadly epidemic among deer, elk and moose in North America and South Korea called Chronic Wasting disease (CWD).

CWD, like Alzheimer’s, is a neurodegenerative disorder that consumes the brain. Thousands of animals have died and are still dying of the disease, while spreading the deadly infection before and after death.

In my opinion, since we have a global prion epidemic among people and regional ones among wildlife, it stands to reason that livestock also are impacted. Unfortunately, we don’t comprehensively test our food supply for prions, so we don’t know to what extent prion disease is, or isn’t, in global herds that supply meat, dairy, and other products. As we discuss later, these deadly proteins have likely made it into our water supplies, too. In some cases, we are even releasing them into the air.

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These deadly diseases are known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins. Victims permanently contaminate the world around them with their bodily fluids. Once contaminated with prions, items cannot be sterilized.

For more information or to buy the E-book, please visit http://alzheimerdisease.tv/alzheimers-disease-epidemic/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Britain Doubles Estimate Of People Carrying Prion Pathogen

Mad Cow Disease A Symptom Of Bigger Problems

About 24,000 people in the UK are carrying the agent that can cause the deadly brain condition Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (CJD), linked with eating infected meat – twice the number previously estimated by scientists. The latest figure is based on a study of 30,000 appendixes removed in operations which were tested for the presence of the prion, or misfolded protein, that causes the condition.

mad cow disease and prions

More than a decade ago ministers assured the public that beef was safe to eat, and then had to eat their words when, in March 1996, it was announced that a new disease, variant CJD, had been discovered in humans.

It had come from eating meat from cows infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a similar disease caused by the now discontinued practice of feeding ground-up animal carcasses to cows as part of their diet. BSE became known as mad cow disease, and in humans CJD is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia and death.

However, only a small proportion of people who carried the prion developed the clinical disease. There have been 173 cases of variant CJD in the UK since it was first identified in 1996.

prion disease epidemic

The number of carriers of the prion is significant because there is a theoretical risk they could spread the disease through blood transfusions or surgical instruments which are not properly sterilized between operations.

Tough measures are in place to minimize these risks. The Health Protection Agency, which published the new figures, said one in 2,000 of the adult population of Britain were carriers of the condition, compared with one in 4,000 shown in a smaller survey in 2004.

Older people, born before 1961, were twice as likely to be carriers as younger people, yet less likely to develop the disease. Professor Sheila Bird of the Medical Research Council Biostatistics unit in Cambridge said: “Our dietary studies suggested older people were more exposed [to BSE infected meat] but they weren’t turning up as clinical cases. They appear to be protected in some way. This shows how important it is to do the surveillance.”

Professor Hugh Perry, chair of the MRC’s neuroscience and mental health board, said: “These figures reinforce the importance that our efforts to prevent, diagnose and treat this devastating disease progress as rigorously as possible.”

A Department of Health spokesman said: “These findings relate to people’s potential to develop vCJD, not additional cases – in fact there have been no new UK cases for nearly two years.

“We have one of the safest blood supplies in the world, but experts will consider the Health Protection Agency study, and any additional measures to reduce the potential risk of transmission through blood transfusions will be put into place.”

The spokesman denied that a delay in publication of the findings was an attempt to bury bad news during the Olympics. “This was a technical study and part of the regular Health Protection Report that is always released on a Friday afternoon,” he said.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/up-to-one-in-2000-britons-could-carry-cjd-agent-8031920.html

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Brain Disease Recycled Through Sewage Sludge

Biosolids Spreading Brain Disease

Colm Kelleher, the author of Brain Trust: The Hidden Connection Between Mad Cow Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease is a fascinating book that covers al lot of ground quickly. It connects many dots about deadly prion diseases.

One pathway that he doesn’t mention is sewage sludge, which exposes livestock, wildlife and humans to the largest prion pathway in the world. Beef and dairy cattle are raised on land contaminated with infectious waste. The infectious prions also contaminate water supplies from that point to downstream reservoirs, including creeks, ponds, rivers, lakes and oceans.

land application sewage sludge

If you study the rates of AD and its geographical distribution, you will find that rates start to soar when a country becomes meat eating (i.e. Japan and Korea in the 1960s) and rises even faster when it adopts a fast food culture (the US and Western Europe in the 50s and 60s) and remains low in vegetarian countries (India) and those without a processed meat industry or fast foods (equatorial Africa)…Murray “

 

Rendering plants, which yearly process over 1 million downer cows  – the ones most likely
to have with prion disease –  can result in infected feeds. Industrial meat packing vats of hamburger, each containing meat from 50 to 100 animals from multiple states and two to four countries may also promote contamination and infection.

In order to understand the threat, one must understand the dynamics of this neurological disease. Alzheimer’s disease, for example, is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). As such, TSEs also are referred to as prion disease. The critical factor is that prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces carry deadly prions from victims. All tissue is infectious just because of the contact with the contaminated blood.

TSEs also include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in the deer family. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure.

prion disease epidemic

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

mad cow disease and prions

It’s highly probable that livestock and wildlife are contracting TSEs from humans via sewage sludge, also known as biosolids. Consuming milk and meat from infected animals brings the disease back into the human food chain. In other words, we’re recycling Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease becasue of the mismanagement of infectious waste.

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Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.