Sewage Sludge Spreading Brain Disease

Biosolids Spreading Brain Disease Among Mammals

In 1972, world leaders realized that dumping millions of tons of sewage sludge into the oceans killed entire underwater ecosystems. Some nations stopped the dumping immediately, while others did not.

The U.S., for example, finally passed the Ocean Dumping Ban Act of 1988. It required dumping all municipal sewage sludge and industrial waste on land. That meant dumping it into landfills or dumping it openly on land, including farms, ranches, national forests, city parks, golf courses, playgrounds, sport fields and beyond. The Act went into effect in 1992 and it sparked a public health disaster. The practice is spreading pathogens to people, livestock, wildlife and beyond every day.

Landfills designed to handle this toxic soup are extremely expensive. So, the dumpers hired a public relations firm to convince unsuspecting citizens that neurotoxins are fertilizer. The PR firm called this toxic waste biosolids. It’s even sold in bags at your local home and garden store as soil for your garden and potting plants. It should be called death dirt.

biosolids management land application

Since then, millions of tons of sewage sludge have been given to farmers as fertilizer every year. Those farmers and ranchers who don’t believe that “fertilizer” bullshit are being paid to dump it on their land and shut up. The farmers are held harmless if the infectious waste causes damage to people or property.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

Unfortunately, the practice of dumping extreme quantities of sewage sludge on land has created an even bigger public health problem. It’s now killing wildlife and it still kills sea mammals. Livestock are not immune to the threat.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for a group of diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is transmissible. TSEs are more commonly known as:

  • bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease) in cattle;
  • scrapie in sheep;
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Alzheimer’s disease in humans; and
  • chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer, elk, moose and reindeer.

According to Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS and Huntington’s disease also are on the TSE spectrum. All are fatal, neurodegenerative brain diseases.

Prions and Prusiner win Nobel Prize

Infectious prions are in the bodily fluids of its victims, including blood, urine, mucus, saliva and feces. These victims send prions to the municipal sewage treatment plant where they remain untouched. Wastewater effluent and sewage sludge recycles prions into the environment. Once dumped on open land, they remain infectious. Irrigation, precipitation and wind carry the prions into groundwater, streams, lakes, oceans and airways, including homes, offices and beyond.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

Reckless wastewater treatment policies and practices are now fueling a global epidemic of neurodegenerative disease among people, wildlife and livestock. The risk assessments are based on fraud and outdated information. The risk assessments for the land application of sewage sludge (LASS) were developed back in the 1970s and 1980s–before we knew about prions and other killers in modern sewage streams, including many forms of infectious medical waste.

The risk assessments were questionable then and they are total failures now. Plus, these risk assessments do not account for the possibility of sewage sludge dumped on land going airborne. It’s much more than a possibility–airborne sewage sludge is killing people and animals. It’s dumping the toxins and infectious waste everywhere.

land application sewage sludge

Unfortunately, the U.S. exported these ridiculous ideas to other nations who proceeded to contaminate their food and water supplies with sewage. If hospitals can’t stop prions, neither can the brain surgeons at wastewater treatment plants.

The legislation banning ocean dumping was very explicit about the need to stop dumping potentially infectious medical waste into the oceans. Ironically, the current policy that promotes LASS ignores the risk of infectious medical waste and many other threats. It also ignores radionuclides, endocrine disruptors, birth control pills, antibiotics, flame-retardants and other toxins and superbugs. This toxic waste belongs in a lined landfill not our watersheds and food supplies. It’s time for immediate reforms.

The same sewage-borne toxins and pathogens are still contaminating our oceans. Now, they’re dumped in further upstream. Entire watersheds are now being infected—including the oceans. The body count among people, livestock and wildlife has been stacking up ever since ocean dumping began phasing out. Biosolids and other forms of sewage mismanagement are now fueling a global epidemic of neurological disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, autism, mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease, microcephaly and more. Industry and governments are scrambling to blame the global epidemic on anything but contaminated soil, water, food and air. They are playing dumb in the face of fraud and scientific suppression. Negligence is too kind of a word for these public servants.

biosolids land application and disease

Sewage also contaminates our food with listeria, e-coli, salmonella and other killers. In fact, scientists are scrambling to come up with new names for the growing list of sewage-related ailments, including Zika virus, West Nile virus, epizoic hemorrhagic fever, equine herpes, valley fever and others. Industrial disease is a more accurate label.

Crops contaminated by sewage sludge can uptake prions and deliver them throughout the plant. Plants then deliver the deadly prions to mammals that consume the plant. In fact, infected plants are spreading prion diseases to several species. When hamsters consumed infected wheat grass, the animals were infected with prion disease. Researchers also found deadly prions in plants exposed to infected urine and feces. The concept of a species barrier is a myth. A deadly prion is a deadly prion. They don’t discriminate among victims.

“These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease,” said Claudio Soto, the lead investigator from the University of Texas at Houston.

Killer prions are impossible to stop. Prions are contributing to the death of millions of people now. Victims produce and spread prions daily because they’re in the bodily fluids of all victims. Millions of people with brain disease are contaminating their homes and communities, while exposing caregivers and family members to the contagion. The sewage from these victims is contaminating the local wastewater treatment plant and everything that enters or leaves these facilities, including reclaimed wastewater and sewage sludge. Once dumped on open land, these contagions remain infectious as they migrate, mutate and multiply forever.

biosolids land application LASS

Prions demand more respect than radiation. They require containment and isolation, not distribution and consumption through air, food and water. These toxins demand lined landfills not reckless dumping on our dinner tables. Prions migrate, mutate and multiply, so dilution is not a solution. Prions are a nightmare.

The world has never done an effective job of managing its sewage. It’s an industry that drives by looking in the rear view mirror. It only swerves when the road is buried in body bags. After enough people get sick and die, new alternatives emerge. Today is no different. The bodies are stacking up. The prion contamination grows stronger and spreads further every day. It’s time to stop dumping sewage sludge on land because of the prion risk and many others that are not accounted for in the antiquated and fraudulent risk assessments. It’s time for citizens to defend our land, water and air–not just our guns.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Today, the land application of sewage sludge is killing mammals and more around the world. Pathogens in sludge are causing brain disease, cancer and death. Let’s take a meaningful stand for food safety. Just say no to biosolids in our watersheds and food supplies.

Take a free preview of our new eBook to learn everything that you need to know about the epidemic and the mismanagement. The rest of the book explains how to defend yourself with aversion and targeted nutrition. Please join our campaign for truth and reform.

For More Information About Food Safety and Water Quality, please visit http://crossbowcommunications.com/land-application-of-sewage-sludge-spreading-brain-disease/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the prion disease epidemic is one of our special areas of practice. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com. Stop prion disease.

Chronic Wasting Disease Spreads To Ohio

Brain Disease Spreading Through Sewage Sludge

The first case of chronic wasting disease in Ohio was confirmed Thursday from a single buck on a deer farm in Holmes County.

Erica Hawkins, spokeswoman for the Ohio Department of Agriculture, said the deer was found at World Class Whitetails in Millersburg. The deer farm has been under quarantine since April 24 because it acquired deer from an operation in Pennsylvania that tested positive for CWD this year.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

The farm was one of 43 captive-deer operations since April to be placed under quarantine for receiving about 125 deer from places in Pennsylvania that had the disease. More than 20 of the quarantines have since been lifted because the Ohio deer farm owners killed the deer in question and chronic wasting disease was not found. There is no way to test a live deer for the disease.

Farms under quarantine are not allowed to sell live animals or purchase any new ones — although deer can still breed, Hawkins said. The quarantine also does not prohibit the farms from allowing controlled hunts for the deer. All deer who die, whether from hunting or natural causes, are tested for the disease. Hawkins said since the quarantines have been in place, 770 deer have been tested from the captive operations and this case was the first one to test positive for the disease.

The state banned all deer imports from Pennsylvania, but that was largely lifted earlier this year. Now the state only bans importing deer from a five-county area in Pennsylvania where chronic wasting disease has been found.

Chronic wasting disease is among a family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, which includes mad cow disease. The diseases are caused by “misfolded” rogue proteins called prions. Prions cause normal protein molecules to mimic their twisted, misshapen form, creating spongelike holes in the brain, a process that can take years. The diseases are always fatal. The human strains of prion diseases cause severe dementia and brain deterioration ending in death. When deer develop symptoms from CWD, they become disoriented and emaciated, literally wasting away.

land application sewage sludge

Scientists suspect the primary way the disease is spread is nose-to-nose contact (actually, the largest prion pathway in the world is sewage sludge, also known as biosolids). The prions, which can be passed on in bodily fluids (from humans and other mammals), are so hardy that they also can bind to soil and remain infectious for years, researchers say. It’s believed that deer can contract the disease by feeding in contaminated areas and possibly by inhaling prions in dust. No human has ever been known to have been infected by the disease.

The disease has now been found in deer farms in 14 states, according to the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance. Critics of deer farms have said they are a perfect breeding ground for disease. Officials from the farm where the disease was found and theWhitetail Deer Farmers of Ohio could not be reached for comment Thursday afternoon.

It has also been found in wildlife in 18 states, according to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, but Hawkins said she is “absolutely” confident the state has contained the disease.

prion disease epidemic

House Bill 389 in 2012 transferred much of the regulatory power over deer farms from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to the Department of Agriculture. Hawkins said the law’s new licensing and record-keeping requirements allowed the state to contain a possible outbreak of the disease much quicker.

Scott Zody, chief of the state division of wildlife, said there is no reason to believe the chronic wasting disease has transferred to the state’s wild deer population.

“With hunting season in progress, there are no CWD concerns that should prevent anyone from enjoying wild deer hunting in Ohio or from consuming meat from healthy animals,” Zody said in a statement.

Source: http://www.bucyrustelegraphforum.com/story/sports/outdoors/2014/10/23/chronic-wasting-disease-found-ohio-deer-farm/17786995/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com. Only the truth about biosolids and infectious sewage sludge can stop chronic wasting disease.

Chronic Wasting Disease Fueled By Sewage Sludge

Biosolids Spreading Brain Disease

By Patrick Durkin

Those who think Wisconsin should just “learn to live” with chronic wasting disease are seeing their surrender take shape as “nature takes its course” on our deer herd.

In fact, folks near Spring Green are living the realities of such clichés. One farmer in the Wyoming valley of north-central Iowa County has shot 21 CWD-positive deer from his family’s 700 acres since 2008, with 11 falling since April 2012.

Those are just a few of the sick deer in a 144-square mile area where CWD (prion disease) is rising at “unprecedented” rates. That one-word assessment came from Bryan Richards, CWD project leader at the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, after reviewing the latest CWD reports from Robert Rolley, a Department of Natural Resources researcher in the wildlife science bureau.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Rolley, Richards and about 50 other citizens, biologists and agency staff were at UW-Stevens Point on April 6 to help implement 62 recommendations from the “Deer Trustee Report,” Dr. James Kroll’s guide to revamping Wisconsin deer management.

Rolley, too, used one word — “frightening” — to assess CWD’s increase in the 12- by-12-mile area around the Wyoming valley. The eastern border of this diseased block abuts CWD’s core area (northeastern Iowa and northwestern Dane counties), where the disease was first discovered 11 years ago.

What constitutes “unprecedented” and “frightening?” First, realize the infection rate in the core area is increasing about 10 percent annually. That resembles annual infection rates of mule deer in southeastern Wyoming’s Converse area, where 40 to 50 percent of the herd is infected with CWD.

prion disease epidemic

Now consider north-central Iowa County:

• CWD’s annual growth rate for all deer (both sexes combined) 2½ years and older is 27 percent.

• Annual disease rates for adult bucks (18 months and older) are doubling every two to three years.

• Roughly every third buck 2½ years and older is infected, as is one in every six yearling bucks (18 months old). Infected deer live two years or less.

• Although the number of diseased females is lower, the infection rate for does 2½ years and older is growing 38 percent annually, faster than for males.

I’m not aware of data anywhere showing wild, free-range deer with similar infection rates,” Richards said. “The only thing worse was the Stan Hall farm (Buckhorn Flats, near Almond), whose penned herd of 76 deer went from one sick deer to 60 in five years.”

That might sound like mere statistics to some, but not to Matt Limmex, 49, an Iowa County dairy farmer who has spent his life on the family’s property. Of the 11 sick deer killed on Limmex’s lands the past year, six fell during 2012 gun seasons.

land application sewage sludge

The other five? Limmex shot them at the DNR’s request after noticing the “droolers and shakers” near his farmyard. In three cases, they were so sick they couldn’t flee when Limmex approached. The DNR retrieved the carcasses for testing and disposal.

“I hate to see this,” Limmex said. “It’s disheartening. I just want to get sick deer off the landscape.”

Limmex said his family deploys about 14 hunters each year during gun season. They’ve also used agricultural shooting permits since 1991 to control the herd. Even so, this is the first time he senses deer numbers decreasing.

“It seems like the disease might be affecting the herd now,” he said.

biosolids land application and disease

So, what’s causing CWD rates in the Wyoming valley to exceed those in the original disease zone? And will it shrink local herds, as experts have long predicted? No one knows, and our state and federal governments aren’t inclined to find out.

The only current DNR-funded deer research by the University of Wisconsin is studying whether predators are affecting North Woods whitetails. Meanwhile, Professor Michael Samuel at the University of Wisconsin is using federal funds to study if deer leave CWD-causing prions in feces, breeding scrapes and mineral licks. But that’s ending soon.

“We’re puzzled by what’s going on in the Wyoming valley,” Samuel said. “It’s very disturbing, but CWD research is on the way out. We could generate hypotheses and proposals to study what’s behind the increases, but I doubt we’d get the funding. There’s little interest in CWD these days, Wisconsin and nationwide.”

Imagine that. The world’s most “disturbing,” “frightening” and “unprecedented” CWD case is growing next door to our capital and flagship university, and our government won’t crack a window to sniff it.

Meanwhile, no group or coalition of hunters, doctors, veterinarians or environmentalists is holding politicians accountable, or funding the research themselves. There’ll be no shortage of shame as this stench spreads.

CWD News Via

http://host.madison.com/sports/recreation/outdoors/patrick-durkin-cwd-s-spreading-and-herd-hunters-deserve-better/article_580298ad-6fcc-5a9c-9cdf-1d6beff51e23.html#ixzz2SA0Z7VLc

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.