Prions Not Stopped By Species Barriers

Prion Disease Killing Many Mammals

Prions are known to migrate, mutate and multiply. They become more voracious as they move from one host to another. New research adds to the bank of evidence that a deadly prion is a deadly prion and they know no borders between species. For years, food safety experts and wildlife managers have put people at ease by hiding behind the myth of species barriers. Blind faith can kill you when it comes to prion dynamics.

Canadian researchers recently discovered a slight change in prions’ makeup appears to give mad cow disease the ability to adapt and spread to other animals. Mutation still is likely a more accurate term, but “adaptation” is close enough for government work. I think the “adaptation” is the equivalent of a chemical reaction that takes place when prions are exposed to a new bank of proteins in a new host (victim).

prion disease epidemic

Neurologist Valerie Sim and her research team at the University of Alberta said the findings might explain how prion diseases, such as chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease, adapt in order to spread between various types of animals.

The prions’ makeup appears to give the disease the ability to adapt by mimicking and recreating new strains with which it comes into contact.

“Prion diseases don’t always successfully go from one animal to another, but when they do, the process is called adaptation. And we want to figure out what triggers that process to happen, what changes happen within prions to allow the disease to spread,” Sim said in a statement.

land application sewage sludge

“One of the important things researchers in this field have realized is that if you pass certain strains of prion disease through a number of different hosts, the disease can adapt along the way and increase the number of susceptible hosts. That’s the big concern right now.”

The findings were published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These diseases are known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins and likely is killing whales.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2013/03/17/Mad-cow-disease-adaptation-key-found/UPI-34591363498413/#ixzz2Np9pCJ6h

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

More Chronic Wasting Disease Found In Texas

Chronic Wasting Disease Spreading In Texas

With the help of hunters, nearly 300 tissue samples were collected for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing from mule deer. All deer were killed in the Trans Pecos region of West Texas during the 2012-13 season. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) have confirmed CWD in four of those samples. Apparently, all CWD-positive deer were harvested within the CWD Containment Zone.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Of 298 deer sampled during hunting season, 107 were harvested in the Containment Zone, 93 were harvested in the adjacent High Risk Zone, 25 were harvested in the Buffer Zone, and 73 deer were harvested outside of the CWD zones. Nineteen of the samples collected from the Containment Zone were from deer harvested in the Hueco Mountains.

“The good news is that CWD has not been detected in Texas outside of the Hueco Mountains of northern El Paso and Hudspeth counties,” said Mitch Lockwood, Big Game Program Director with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Including the two positives reported from TPWD’s strategic sampling effort last summer, and the three positives reported by New Mexico Game and Fish last year, CWD has been detected in 9 of 31 deer sampled in the Hueco Mountains.

CWD is a member of the group of diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Other diseases in this group include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) in cattle, and Cruetzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. CWD among cervids is a progressive, fatal disease that commonly results in altered behavior as a result of microscopic changes made to the brain of affected animals.

land application sewage sludge

An animal may carry the disease for years without outward indication, but in the latter stages, signs may include listlessness, lowering of the head, weight loss, repetitive walking in set patterns, and a lack of responsiveness. CWD is not known to affect humans.

There is no vaccine or cure for CWD, but steps have been taken to minimize the risk of the disease spreading from beyond the area where it currently exists. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission and Texas Animal Health Commission adopted rules restricting movement of deer, elk, and other susceptible species within or from the CWD Zones, and enhancing surveillance efforts.

Source: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/newsmedia/releases/?req=20130211c

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Chronic Wasting Disease Reaches Pennsylvania

Sewage Sludge Recycles Brain Disease

Forget about the latest outbreak of EHD, which has now run its course here in Western Pennsylvania; there was even worse news last week regarding the state’s deer herd. The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has confirmed the first positive case of Chronic Wasting Disease in the state on a deer farm in Adams County.

chronic wasting disease cause

The fact CWD was found at a deer farm in New Oxford is a little better than finding it in the general deer population – since the state can now quarantine that farm – but it is troubling nonetheless.

CWD is fatal in deer, elk and moose, but there is no evidence CWD can be transmitted to humans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization.

“Pennsylvania has an aggressive Chronic Wasting Disease surveillance program and a strong response plan,” said Agriculture Secretary George Greig. “Steps are being taken to prevent further spread of this disease to the state’s captive and wild deer populations.”

land application sewage sludge

In addition to the Adams County location, a quarantine has been set up on two farms directly associated with the positive deer, one in Williamsport, the other in York County.

“To date, CWD has not been found in Pennsylvania’s wild deer population,” said Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe. “Concerns over CWD should not prevent anyone from enjoying deer hunting and consuming meat from healthy animals.”

In order to understand the threat, one must understand the dynamics of this neurological disease. Alzheimer’s disease, for example, is a member of an aggressive family of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

TSEs are caused by a deadly protein called a prion (PREE-on). As such, TSEs also are referred to as prion disease. The critical factor is that prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. All tissue is infectious just because of the contact with the contaminated blood.

TSEs also include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease in the deer family. Few, if any, mammals are immune. There is no cure.

prion disease epidemic

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions.

Prions are unstoppable. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims. Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

Chronic wasting disease can spread via many vectors, but the wastewater treatment process and the disposal of sewage sludge on land is being completely ignored. Sewage sludge is the largest prion pathway in the world.

When the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, it classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and much more. Only two labs in the U.S. were allowed to handle them for research purposes. Unfortunately, the CDC quietly took prions off the list because the regulation criminalized entire industries and several reckless practices.

sewage treatment plant and disease

Wastewater treatment plants, for example, are spreading this infectious waste far and wide because they are incapable of stopping prions. All by-products and discharges from wastewater treatment plants are infectious waste, which are contributing to the global epidemic of neurodegenerative disease among humans, wildlife and livestock. Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA and the industry trade organization—the Wastewater Effluent Federation. Sewage sludge (biosolids) and wastewater reclamation are causing widespread contamination.

Read More at http://crossbowcommunications.com/biosolids-and-public-health/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Florida Woman Dies Of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

CJD Takes Florida Woman

Charlie Bryant is choosing to remember his mother how he saw her most of his life. “She was just the most incredible, charismatic woman,” Bryant said. At 58-years-old, Stephanie Bryant was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), also known as the human form of mad cow disease–a prion disease. Within months, Stephanie’s health quickly deteriorated. She suffered from memory loss, constant tremors, couldn’t walk and barely talk. Stephanie Bryant passed away Wednesday, Aug. 1.

“It’s the sickest, meanest disease,” Charlie Bryant said.

Prions are unstoppable and the pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. Prions shed from humans are the most deadly mutation. They demand more respect than radiation. Infected surgical instruments, for example, are impossible to sterilize and hospitals throw them away. Prions are in the blood, saliva, urine, feces, mucus, and bodily tissue of its victims.

Many factors are contributing to the epidemic. Prions are now the X factor. Industry and government are not accounting for them or regulating them. They are ignoring the threat completely, which violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 in the United States. Other nations also are ignoring laws developed to protect food, air and water.

prion disease epidemic

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

http://www.abc-7.com/story/19198888/woman-with-mad-cow-disease-passes-away

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications is a full-service advertising agency and public relations firm in Denver, Colorado and Phoenix, Arizona. The firm specializes in issue management and public affairs.

CSU Developing Test For Chronic Wasting Disease

Deadly Disease Spreading Through Infectious Waste

New research at Colorado State University could yield better testing for chronic wasting disease, which affects wildlife and other animals in several states (and now Norway), say CSU scientists. The CSU study is developing and evaluating a more sensitive test for the disease, including the potential to test for infection in live animals, animal products and the environment. The CSU project is being funded by the Denver-based Morris Animal Foundation.

chronic wasting disease

Chronic wasting disease strikes deer, moose and elk and is related to similar diseases in cattle and sheep. It is a primary concern for hunters and wildlife ranchers and has spread to 19 states, two Canadian provinces and one Asian country, says CSU.

The research is aimed at prions, rogue proteins that cause the family of diseases that include chronic wasting disease – or CWD. The diseases are known as spongiform encephalopathies. While the Morris Animal Foundation-funded study would be the first in several steps to develop and evaluate a potential new test, it will look at a method that shows promise in detecting a wider array of prions at lower levels than are currently detected. The research could allow the detection of CWD prions in live animals, animal products and the environment.

land application sewage sludge

“Developing this test may eventually lead to a more rapid and sensitive test for CWD,” said Ed Hoover, a CSU veterinarian and researcher with 30 years of experience in research infectious diseases of animals. “But, just as significantly, it may lead to a substantial gain in our understanding of how prions spread, survive in natural habitats, and impact animal and public health.”

Currently, CWD can only be identified either by testing brain tissue after an animal is deceased or by surgical sampling and testing lymphatic tissues. While researchers don’t know exactly how CWD is passed from animal to animal, CSU scientists discovered that bodily fluids such as saliva, blood, urine and feces harbor infectious prions. They essentially contaminate the environment until they die and then threaten the life of any creature that consumes them after death.

biosolids land application and disease

Animals can then be exposed by direct contact with an infected animal or by contact with a contaminated environment. CWD is unstoppable.

Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more.

Deer, elk, moose and reindeer are now contracting prion disease from humans. To help cloak the epidemic, it’s called chronic wasting disease (CWD). Deer with CWD are proverbial canaries in a coal mine. They are being killed by government sharpshooters to help cover up the problem.

Wastewater treatment plants, for example, are spreading infectious waste (prions) far and wide because they are incapable of stopping prions. All by-products and discharges from wastewater treatment plants are infectious waste, which are contributing to the global epidemic of neurodegenerative disease among humans, wildlife and livestock. Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA and the industry trade organization—the Wastewater Effluent Federation. Sewage sludge (biosolids) and wastewater reclamation are causing widespread contamination.

Crops for humans and livestock grown grown in sewage sludge absorb prions and become infectious. We’re all vulnerable to Alzheimer’s and other forms of prion disease right now due to widespread denial and mismanagement. It’s time to stop the land application of sewage sludge (LASS) in all nations.

Read more about CWD http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_19113245#ixzz2JxJCBwQI

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.