Neurodegenerative Disease A Preventable Disease

Nutrition Helps Beat, Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

The brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease collect particles of protein that are not expelled from their bodies for one reason or another. These protein particles start sticking together and forming plaques in the brain, which smother and kill healthy brain cells. This damage starts in the hippocampus—the region of the brain responsible for memory.

Alzheimer's disease epidemic

Much like the plaque on our teeth, these proteins create cavities inside the brain as more cells are killed. Dead brain cells then contribute to the avalanche of plaque building up, which causes the damage to escalate and spread to other regions of the brain. The brain damage spreads until it stops vital bodily functions.

These protein deposits are called tau and beta-amyloid. In Parkinson’s disease, a similar form of protein known as alpha synuclein builds up in the region of the brain that controls motor skills. In other words, the primary difference between Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease is where the protein formation begins.

“There is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine.

A new study published in the journal Nature renews concern about the transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease between people. A second study by the same scientist in early 2016 adds to the stack of evidence.

Neuroscientist Laura Manuelidis claims that at least 25 percent of Alzheimer’s diagnoses are not Alzheimer’s disease. These misdiagnoses are actually Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), which is further up the prion spectrum. CJD, without dispute, is extremely infectious to caregivers and loved ones. Millions of cases of deadly CJD are being misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease. Millions of patients and caregivers are being misinformed, misguided and exposed to an aggressive disease. Misdiagnosis and misinformation regarding prion disease is a matter of life and death. The mismanagement doesn’t end here.

CJD is the most aggressive form of neurodegenerative disease. It behaves in a similar fashion, but at a much faster pace. It’s not certain if CJD is a different mutation of prion disease or just an extreme point of progression of Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease.

Prions and Prusiner win Nobel Prize

These protein deposits include a deadly form of protein called a prion (PREE-on). Stanley Prusiner earned the Nobel Prize in physiology in 1996 for his pioneering work on prions. Unfortunately, his earth-shattering science has been ignored and a global health epidemic has been unleashed. He claims that Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and Huntington disease are part of the prion spectrum. Autism could be a prion mutation, too.

Prions are in the bodily fluids of victims, who proceed to contaminate the world around them. Prion contamination is impossible to sterilize. An infected cup or spoon is infected forever. According to Prusiner and other neurologists, infectious prions are involved with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Prions are such a formidable threat that the U.S. government enacted the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002. It classified prions as select agents that pose an extreme risk to food, water and health systems. Unfortunately, the Centers For Disease Control quietly took prions off the list about two years ago because the classification threatened to criminalize multi-billion dollar industries and many industry practices.

Prions are not alive. They migrate, mutate and multiply. Neutralizing them requires isolation and containment, much like the protocol for radiation. Unfortunately, many industries are creating new prion pathways and prion victims every day because of misinformation and mismanagement. These reckless practices are contributing to the global Alzheimer’s epidemic. It’s become an industrial disease for millions of people.

To learn more, please spend some time on our website. We explain why Alzheimer’s disease is transmissible and how mismanagement is contaminating food and water supplies around the world. The concept of Pandora’s box is no longer a fantasy. Prions are unstoppable. They are fueling the global epidemic in neurodegenerative disease now.

treat Alzheimer's disease

Fortunately, Mother Nature offers hope. Beneficial foods can help us fend off these killer plaques and purge damaging molecules from our bodies. Nutrition offers the only real hope in treating the symptoms of the disease and maximizing the quality of life for those caught in its grasp.

You are what you eat, so eat nutritious food. Eat organic food. Avoid processed foods, which contain ingredients harmful to your brain, including refined sugar, processed fructose, gluten, genetically engineered ingredients, and pesticides like glyphosate. We will discuss these nutritional strategies in our upcoming documentary. We also will explore specific foods that are exceptionally beneficial to our minds and bodies.

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Order our new eBook now to defend yourself and your family from brain disease.

Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment http://alzheimerdisease.tv/how-to-outsmart-alzheimers-disease/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

North Carolina Confirms 17 Cases Of CJD Since 2011

Three People Die Of CJD In Cleveland County Recently

It started with double vision. That’s when Ellen Horton knew something was wrong with her husband, Raymond. The couple was en route back to Shelby from a car show in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., in September. She described his driving as erratic.

creutzfeldt jakob disease outbreak in North Carolina

“He was all over the road. He would run off the road and cross the center lines,” she said. “I found out (that) to him, the line in the roads were curved because of his eyes.”

The couple visited multiple doctors searching for answers. None surfaced. With time, daily activities became a strain for the Marine Corps veteran. His sight never came back. His arms stiffened.

“He couldn’t hold a sandwich. He forgot where his mouth was to feed him,” Horton remembered. “He was fine in Pigeon Forge. He saw the ceiling fan continuously turning, but the fan was off.”

 

Reading became impossible for Raymond. The avid reader had read the Bible more than once. Horton said all Raymond wanted was his eyesight back. Tears sat on the rim of her eyelids. What Raymond is believed to have battled affects less than 400 people each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

biosolids management land application

It would be December before Horton discovered what plagued her husband. Raymond saw Dr. Kevin Klein, head neurologist of Klein Neurology and Sleep, in December. Klein used an EEG and MRI to gain a closer look inside Raymond’s brain.

“He was unsteady when he walked. He had recent issues with memory,” Klein recalled.

The answers lied in the MRI scan, which shows detailed images of organs and tissues. Parts of Raymond’s brain cortex appeared white on the MRI scan. Klein said the discoloration, or abnormal diffusions, were similar to what doctors see in stroke patients. Raymond never had a stroke.

“Most people who have what he did don’t lose their vision first, but he did,” Klein said.

CJD Diagnosis

Klein diagnosed Raymond with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The rare, degenerative brain disease — not unlike mad cow disease — is marked by abnormal proteins called prions that can develop in humans and animals, the CDC reports.

land application sewage sludge

It was previously reported two Cleveland County deaths with links to CJD, one in December and another in January. Both deaths were labeled “probable cases” of CJD.

CJD can come in various forms, including classic/sporadic, which develops naturally in humans. It can lay dormant for many years. Symptoms usually surface about age 65 in those affected, according to the National Library of Medicine’s website. The disease is contagious.

Horton found relief in her husband’s diagnosis. But Raymond’s condition worsened. He was admitted to Cleveland County Hospice in mid-December. Nurses bathed and shaved him. Members from the N.C. Foothills Marine Corps League Detachment 1164 visited their former commandant while he was in Hospice. Horton recalled a moment where she laid her head on her ailing husband.

“I told him I loved him,” she said. “His mouth moved and I read, ‘I love you, too.’”

She sat calmly on her living room couch. A white tissue caught the falling tears from her eyelids.

“He went through three months of hell,” Horton said.

Raymond died Dec. 28. He was 66 years old.

All forms of CJD are fatal. There is no known cure.

More CJD Cases In North Carolina

Klein diagnosed two other patients in Cleveland County with sporadic CJD in 2012. Both were between 60 and 70 years old. Both passed away shortly after.

“That’s a high number,” Klein said. “It’s unknown where sporadic CJD comes from.”

CJD can mirror other diseases such as dementia, Alzheimer’s and some later-staged cancers. Symptoms include difficulty speaking and swallowing, memory loss, blurred vision and jerky movements, according to the National Library of Medicine’s website. Raymond displayed all of them.

About 85 percent of CJD cases in the nation are sporadic, the CDC reports. Since 2011, The N.C. Department of Health and Human Services reported 17 confirmed cases of CJD. Nine were labeled probable. Most with sporadic CJD live up to seven months before succumbing to the disease, the MayoClinic reports.

CJD can only be confirmed through a brain biopsy or a cerebrospinal fluid test, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke’s website. All three of Klein’s patients are called “probable cases” of CJD because neither test was performed. Any tests to confirm CJD must be arranged by the hospital handling the case, it was previously reported.

Horton said, because CJD was new to her, she didn’t realize a brain biopsy could be done. Later, Horton requested a test on Raymond’s spinal fluids from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem. The results are pending.

Horton believes Raymond suffered from CJD after a doctor from Wake Forest Baptist agreed with Klein’s diagnosis.

“I didn’t want to put his body through anymore,” Horton said about opting out of a brain biopsy.

Horton described her husband as an “all-around kind of guy.” Those who found a father figure in Raymond called him “paw-paw” or “Daddy Raymond.” She doesn’t know if Raymond knew he had CJD.

“He never asked about it or mentioned it,” she said. “I still wonder if I’m going to end up with it.”

Raymond’s case was the first time Horton heard of CJD. It could be the same for many others.

She hopes sharing Raymond’s story not only leads to closure, but awareness.

“We don’t know what we’re walking around with in our bodies. We don’t,” she said. “So little is known about it.”

Horton clutched a framed picture of Raymond smiling. He wore a Marines cap. Horton said, she and Raymond lived to help others.

She wants his story to do the same.

Prion News Update via http://www.gastongazette.com/news/local/doctor-probable-case-of-rare-fatal-disease-third-for-area-in-recent-months-1.112799

Prions Not Stopped By Species Barriers

Prion Disease Killing Many Mammals

Prions are known to migrate, mutate and multiply. They become more voracious as they move from one host to another. New research adds to the bank of evidence that a deadly prion is a deadly prion and they know no borders between species. For years, food safety experts and wildlife managers have put people at ease by hiding behind the myth of species barriers. Blind faith can kill you when it comes to prion dynamics.

Canadian researchers recently discovered a slight change in prions’ makeup appears to give mad cow disease the ability to adapt and spread to other animals. Mutation still is likely a more accurate term, but “adaptation” is close enough for government work. I think the “adaptation” is the equivalent of a chemical reaction that takes place when prions are exposed to a new bank of proteins in a new host (victim).

prion disease epidemic

Neurologist Valerie Sim and her research team at the University of Alberta said the findings might explain how prion diseases, such as chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease, adapt in order to spread between various types of animals.

The prions’ makeup appears to give the disease the ability to adapt by mimicking and recreating new strains with which it comes into contact.

“Prion diseases don’t always successfully go from one animal to another, but when they do, the process is called adaptation. And we want to figure out what triggers that process to happen, what changes happen within prions to allow the disease to spread,” Sim said in a statement.

land application sewage sludge

“One of the important things researchers in this field have realized is that if you pass certain strains of prion disease through a number of different hosts, the disease can adapt along the way and increase the number of susceptible hosts. That’s the big concern right now.”

The findings were published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Prions are associated with an entire family of neurological disorders that are killing people, wildlife and livestock around the world. These diseases are known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.” TSEs include Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, scrapie, chronic wasting disease and mad cow disease. The disease has killed many species of mammals including dolphins and likely is killing whales.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2013/03/17/Mad-cow-disease-adaptation-key-found/UPI-34591363498413/#ixzz2Np9pCJ6h

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Prions Not Phased By Sewage Treatment Processes

Deadly Prion Proteins Survive Wastewater Treatment Process

By Michael Woods

Scientists in Wisconsin are reporting in a paper scheduled for the July 1 issue of ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology that typical wastewater treatment processes do not degrade prions. Prions, rogue proteins that cause incurable brain infections such as Mad Cow disease and its human equivalent, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Alzheimer’s disease are difficult to inactivate, resisting extreme heat, chemical disinfectants, and irradiation. In fact, prions are known to migrate, mutate and multiply.

Until now, scientists did not know whether prions entering sewers and septic tanks from slaughterhouses, meatpacking facilities, or private game dressing, could survive and pass through conventional sewage treatment plants.

sewage treatment plant and disease

Joel Pedersen and colleagues used laboratory experiments with simulated wastewater treatment to show that prions can be recovered from wastewater sludge after 20 days, remaining in the biosolids, a byproduct of sewage treatment sometimes used to fertilize farm fields.

Although emphasizing that prions have never been reported in wastewater treatment plant water or biosolids, the researchers note that existing tests are not sufficiently sensitive to detect the extremely low levels of prions possible in those materials. In other words, they have never been proven to be free of prions or capable of stopping them from being released back into the environment with discharges or sewage sludge.

land application sewage sludge

As such, wastewater treatment plants are spreading this infectious waste far and wide because they are incapable of stopping prions. All by-products and discharges from wastewater treatment plants are infectious waste, which are contributing to the global epidemic of neurodegenerative disease among humans, wildlife and livestock. Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Just ask the U.S. EPA and the industry trade organization—the Wastewater Effluent Federation. Sewage sludge (biosolids) and wastewater reclamation are causing widespread contamination.

Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. They migrate, mutate and multiply as they infect crops, water supplies and more.

The proof is in the pudding, so to speak. Deer, elk, moose and reindeer are now contracting prion disease from humans. To help cloak the epidemic, it’s called chronic wasting disease (CWD). Deer with CWD are proverbial canaries in a coal mine.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

When cattle are exposed to prions, it’s being called mad cow disease or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, which is just a clever way of saying transmissible spongiform encephalopathy). Species barriers are a myth and part of the cover-up.

Unfortunately, prions linger in the environment, homes, hospitals, nursing homes, dental offices and beyond infinitely. Prions defy all attempts at sterilization and inactivation. If they can’t stop prions in the friendly and sterile confines of an operating room, they can’t stop them in the wastewater treatment plant.

biosolids land application and disease

The risk assessments prepared by the U.S. EPA for wastewater treatment and sewage sludge are flawed and current practices of recycling this infectious waste is fueling a public health disaster. Many risks are not addressed, including prions and radioactive waste. They don’t mention prions or radiation because there is no answer. Most nations are making the same mistake. We’re dumping killer proteins on crops, parks, golf courses, gardens, ski areas, school grounds and beyond. Wind, rain and irrigation spread these contaminants and many more throughout our communities and watersheds. It’s time to stop the land application of sewage sludge (LASS) in all nations. Safer alternatives exist.

For more information, read “Persistence of Pathogenic Prion Protein during Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes,”  http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es703186e

Contact the leading expert on prions in soil and sewage sludge, Joel A. Pedersen. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Madison, Wisconsin
Phone: (608) 263-4971
Email: japedersen@soils.wisc.edu

Prion News via http://engineeringevil.com/2012/09/13/prions-are-not-degraded-by-conventional-sewage-treatment-processes/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

More Mismanagement of Deadly Mad Cow Disease

Prion Pathogen Highly Contagious

After eight years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reopened the comment period for its rule on what cow parts may be used in human products Monday because research completed since the interim rule was published has revealed traces of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and deadly prions in parts of the intestine currently allowed in human food and drugs.

mad cow disease

Since there is no way to ever sterilize the production line once infected with prions, just one infected animal part will contaminate the production line forever. Food, cosmetics, gel caps, lotions and other products could kill you and your family. Even our water supplies have been compromised due to prion mismanagement, including sewage mismanagement.

The report is alarming. Again, it shows that regulators are protecting the public health with blind faith, ignorance and incompetence. We must demand that deadly prions be regulated based on proven safety as opposed to one of a proven risk (ie. dead people). It took them eight years of status quo to raise this flag and countless products have been contaminated in the interim. As a result, we can only guess how many families have been exposed to this deadly and incurable prion disease. This is reckless, negligent and unforgivable. It’s criminal. It’s bioterrorism.

In 2005, FDA issued its interim final rule, “Use of Materials Derived From Cattle in Human Food and Cosmetics,” which stated that a cow’s small intestine was safe for use in human products as long as the portion called the distal ileum had been removed. At the time, the distal ileum was known to be a potential reservoir for BSE, also known as mad cow disease, but other parts of the small intestine were considered safe.

mad cow disease and prions

Since that time, studies have found low levels of BSE in other parts of the cow’s intestine, including the proximal ileum, jejunum, ileocecal junction, and colon, prompting concerns that perhaps the U.S. Department of Agriculture (which regulates meat safety) and FDA should also prohibit these parts from use in human foods and cosmetics. Of course, they should be kept out of rendering facilities, where they can be recycled back into products and animal feed (including pet food). In fact, we should demand answers about where the risky parts, such as the distal ileum, spinal cords, eyes, tonsils, and other specified risk material (SRM) are going now.

“The infectivity levels reported in these studies were much lower than the infectivity levels that were previously demonstrated in the distal ileum,” notes FDA. (It only takes one prion to kill you, so, I’m not feeling any safer despite this disclaimer.)

In light of these findings, FDA has reopened the comment period on its 2005 interim final rule in order to hear from anyone who has information on the topic. These are questions that should have been asked long ago.

When the FDA announced the reopened comment period, it stated that it believes that the trace levels of infectivity found in these other parts of the intestine don’t pose a risk of human exposure to BSE in the United States. That’s nonsense. Prions migrate, mutate and multiply. They can’t be stopped. So to say that the levels of infectivity are low further demonstrates the FDA’s and USDA’s incompetence or willingness to tolerate and unleash risks to the public.

“We want to hear from other people,” says Sebastian Cianci, spokesperson for FDA. “From what we’re seeing, we’ve concluded that there wouldn’t be a measurable reduction of risk from removing other parts. However, we want other people to weigh in before a final determination is made.”

In reaching its conclusion, FDA says it also considered a recent opinion from the European Union Food Safety Authority on the risk of BSE from parts of the small intestine other than the distal ileum. Why aren’t they actively seeking and sharing this information on a global basis? The bad news is that other prion risks remain unchecked and or mismanaged. The pathways to prion contamination in food, water, products and our healthcare systems are numerous.

A look at the opinion handed down from EFSA’s Panel on Biological Hazards shows that the group was unable to draw a conclusion about the safety of other parts of a cow’s intestine. Bullshit. It’s time to put all of the facts on the table and keep all risks off of our dinner table and out of our homes and hands. prions have been classified as a “select agent” by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Research is tightly controlled and extremely limited. Why are the USDA and FDA conducting chemistry experiments with them in our food, water, cosmetics and other products? What gives them the right to turn every human on the planet into a guinea pig? Any person or agency that violates the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Prevention Act of 2002 is, by definition, a terrorist.

“Due to limitations in the data currently available, an accurate quantification of the amount of infectivity in the intestinal parts other than ileum of Classical BSE infected cattle at different stages of the incubation period cannot be provided,” says the panel in its conclusion. Unfortunately, given the dangers of prions, it only takes one to multiply into millions. It only takes one prion to kill you. Quantification of this dynamic is very simple math.

The reopened comment period has been posted in the Federal Register. You can access it  here. Comments can be submitted by clicking the “Submit a Formal Comment” button.

Thanks to Gretchen Goetz and Food Safety News for their contribution to this article. http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/03/fda-seeks-comments-on-risk-of-bse-from-cow-intestines/#.UTYS9IXxOkF

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

More Chronic Wasting Disease Found In Texas

Chronic Wasting Disease Spreading In Texas

With the help of hunters, nearly 300 tissue samples were collected for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing from mule deer. All deer were killed in the Trans Pecos region of West Texas during the 2012-13 season. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) have confirmed CWD in four of those samples. Apparently, all CWD-positive deer were harvested within the CWD Containment Zone.

chronic wasting disease caused by prions

Of 298 deer sampled during hunting season, 107 were harvested in the Containment Zone, 93 were harvested in the adjacent High Risk Zone, 25 were harvested in the Buffer Zone, and 73 deer were harvested outside of the CWD zones. Nineteen of the samples collected from the Containment Zone were from deer harvested in the Hueco Mountains.

“The good news is that CWD has not been detected in Texas outside of the Hueco Mountains of northern El Paso and Hudspeth counties,” said Mitch Lockwood, Big Game Program Director with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Including the two positives reported from TPWD’s strategic sampling effort last summer, and the three positives reported by New Mexico Game and Fish last year, CWD has been detected in 9 of 31 deer sampled in the Hueco Mountains.

CWD is a member of the group of diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Other diseases in this group include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) in cattle, and Cruetzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. CWD among cervids is a progressive, fatal disease that commonly results in altered behavior as a result of microscopic changes made to the brain of affected animals.

land application sewage sludge

An animal may carry the disease for years without outward indication, but in the latter stages, signs may include listlessness, lowering of the head, weight loss, repetitive walking in set patterns, and a lack of responsiveness. CWD is not known to affect humans.

There is no vaccine or cure for CWD, but steps have been taken to minimize the risk of the disease spreading from beyond the area where it currently exists. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission and Texas Animal Health Commission adopted rules restricting movement of deer, elk, and other susceptible species within or from the CWD Zones, and enhancing surveillance efforts.

Source: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/newsmedia/releases/?req=20130211c

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Indonesia Bans U.S. Beef Over Mad Cow Disease

Indonesia Closes Ports To American Beef

When authorities discovered a case of mad cow disease in Hanford, California last year, Indonesia became the first nation to ban beef from the United States. The fallout was immediate, and U.S. beef sales to Indonesia plummeted to nearly nothing.

mad cow disease and Indonesia

Much to the satisfaction of cattle producers in states such as California and Texas, the U.S. government has decided to fight back: In the latest case to go before the World Trade Organization, the Obama administration is pressing Indonesia to open its markets and its estimated 240 million consumers to more American exports or face consequences.

“There’s no scientific basis for turning away U.S. beef,” said John Harris, owner of Harris Ranch Beef Co., the family-run operation in Fresno County since the 1930s.

Kevin Kester, a fifth-generation rancher from Parkfield in the Coast Range foothills beyond Coalinga, called Indonesia’s action a “knee-jerk political action.”

And with U.S. beef exports accounting for nearly 13% of the industry’s market last year, cattle producers say they rely on selling meat to foreigners to make a living. Industry officials say that foreign markets have become particularly important for meat cuts that won’t sell here. The Japanese, for example, have shown an affinity for cow tongue, helping drive up the value of U.S. beef sold to Japan by 19% in 2012.

Last month, U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk said the United States had reached a new agreement with Japan to remove some of the restrictions on selling beef, a move that he said would result in hundreds of millions of dollars of additional sales in coming years.

“We’re not subsidized by the federal government at all — so we live and die by the marketplace,” said Kent Bacus, associate director of legislative affairs in Washington for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a trade group that represents 230,000 breeders, producers and feeders.

The stakes are high for the U.S. economy, with the beef industry supporting 1.4 million jobs, according to industry statistics. And in 2011, the 742,000 beef herds roaming the nation’s pastures resulted in $44 billion of economic activity in the United States, the beef association said.

The Indonesian Embassy in Washington would not discuss the case but said in a statement that Indonesia “takes note” of the U.S. action and will respond in a timely manner.

“The government of Indonesia’s aim is not to restrict imports, but to ensure that all imported goods are safe for consumption by consumers and safe for the environment,” said the statement, released by Ni Made Ayu Marthini, a commercial attache.

The push to gain more access to Indonesia comes amid hard times for the U.S. cattle industry, the world’s largest supplier of beef.

John Keating, president of Cargill Beef, recently noted that the size of the U.S. cattle herd is now at its lowest point since 1952.

It’s a familiar story for Kester, 57, who owns a ranch in Monterey County, with more than 20,000 acres between the San Joaquin Valley and Central Coast. He has spent all his life in the cattle industry and has watched it shrink, with the average age of a rancher now approaching 60.

“It’s harder and harder for ranchers and farmers to be in business because of high regulatory costs and high land prices across the nation, especially places like here in California,” said Kester, former president of the California Cattlemen’s Association. “As time marches on, we just have less and less people in the business and less production.”

Industry officials say the ban in Indonesia now has been replaced with tight quotas and requirements that force U.S. exporters to apply for licenses, making it nearly impossible for cattle producers to sell their products.

Mad Cow disease is a form of prion disease. Prion disease in humans is called Creutzfeldt-Jakobs disease. Even Alzheimer’s disease is now considered a form of prion diseases. Prion diseases of all forms are always fatal. Prions themselves are known to migrate, mutate and multiply. As a rogue form of protein, prions cannot be killed, stopped or neutralized. Infected animals and humans contaminate their environment and risk infecting others via blood, saliva, urine and feces.

By Rob Hotakainen – Bee Washington Bureau. Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/2013/02/08/3166790/us-fights-indonesia-beef-ban-after.html#storylink=cpy 

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Japan Will Ease Mad Cow Disease Restrictions on U.S. Beef

Pathogen Behind Mad Cow Disease Unstoppable

For only the second time in ten years, Japan will further ease restrictions on U.S. beef imports starting to allow entry of beef and beef products from cattle less than 30 months of age. They will implement the new regulation on February 1, 2013.Previously, a 2006 restriction limited U.S. beef imports to products from cattle under 20 months of age. Japan set that restriction when it allowed limited U.S. beef imports to resume after a cow with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was found in a U.S herd in 2003.Japan’s easing of restrictions on U.S. beef imports is a sign that there is more product demand than fear in the Asian nation about BSE, popularly known as Mad Cow Disease.

mad cow disease and Japan imports of U.S. beef

Opening Japan’s market to more U.S. beef will result in “hundreds of million of dollars in exports of U.S. beef to Japan in coming years,” according to a statement by U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack.

Kirk and Vilsack depicted the trade agreement as a “near normalization” of beef trade between the two nations. “This is great news for American ranchers and beef companies, who can now—as a result of this agreement—increase their exports of U.S. beef to their largest market for beef in Asia,” Ambassador Kirk said.

Kirk called it a “significant and historic step” that will grow American exports and jobs.

Japan banned U.S. beef in 2003 after the first cow with BSE was discovered near Mabton, WA. It took three years before it allowed some imports from the younger animals.

Japan’s independent Food Safety Commission (FSC) conducted a risk assessment in 2011 that found raising the age limit in conjunction of U.S. controls on specific risk materials (SRM) could address safety concerns.

land application sewage sludge

The expanded U.S. beef exports to Japan could reach the country by mid February and will likely put upward pressure on prices as American cattle numbers are at the lowest levels in 60 years. The drought affecting much of the U.S. has caused farmers and ranches to reduce their herds because dry lands aren’t producing enough to support the cattle.

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Criminal Puts Bad Beef Into Food Supply

The following case demonstrates how farmers are willing and able to ignore food safety laws around the world, while regulators have little leverage over the situation and the judicial system slaps them on the wrist for taking deadly risks with the health of millions of people. Prion mismanagement is a serious threat to life as we know it.

Another Case Of Prion Mismanagement

Carlisle Crown Court heard that the crimes committed by David Holmes, 52, led to the disappearance of 33 cattle. They likely became hamburgers and pot roast for unsuspecting families across the UK and could have contaminated the entire production chain.

mad cow disease and prions

Many of the cows were born before 1996, meaning that they posed a potential risk to humans if they ever got into the food chain. Infected meat has been blamed for causing most of the 170 deaths in the UK from the brain disease variant CJD, the human form of BSE, also known as mad cow disease.

Some of Holmes’ animals were at Crook Farm, Roadhead, north of Carlisle.

Passing sentence, Judge Peter Davies told the farmer: “I am satisfied that these offenses were committed deliberately for commercial profit.” The judge said that it was imperative that diseased cattle were not provided for human consumption.

Holmes flouted the regulations, deliberately obstructing the authorities and failing to keep proper records.

As a result, 33 of the defendant’s cattle could not be traced, having been sold “at great risk to the public”, said Judge Davies, who added: “It was a cynical pattern of offending, without consideration for the public.”

The court heard there was no evidence that any infected meat had actually entered the human food chain.

At an earlier hearing, Holmes, now living at Nutholm Farm, Lockerbie, admitted 30 counts of contravening cattle identification and movement regulations. He repeatedly failed to notify the British Cattle Movement Service (BCMS) that he was moving cattle between different locations.

The offences included failing to keep a proper register of his herds, using an ear tag on a cow previously that identified another animal, and giving officials misleading information about his cows.

The crimes were committed on a continuous basis between 2009 and 2011. They happened at the farm near Carlisle, and at others in Northumberland, Staffordshire, and Derbyshire.

Holmes has previous convictions which date back to the 1980s, including a number of animal cruelty offenses.

The farmer’s barrister pointed out he had given up cattle dealing, and the company he ran for that purpose – D&A Livestock Limited – was in liquidation and would not be resurrected.

The judge said figures showed the defendant’s business generated just short of £143,000 in the last nine months, while his remaining cattle are valued at between £30,000 and £45,000, so there was no reason for Holmes not to pay costs.

The judge imposed a fine of £3,000 and prosecution costs of £6,600. Holmes will have to serve three months in jail if he fails to pay up.

In addition he was given a 12-month jail term, suspended for two years, and told to do 150 hours of unpaid work in the community.

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

 

CJD Kills North Carolina Boy

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Taking Younger Victims

By Andrew Kenney

It wasn’t bacteria or a virus that plagued young Michael Mendy’s body and mind. He did not inherit his symptoms from his mother or father. Nothing toxic was in his blood. An autopsy reveals that he died of prion disease. And while he was sick, Michael’s parents had no explanation.

“I had to figure it out. I had to find an answer. I had to find a doctor that could help him,” said Michael’s mother, Kathleen Mendy, who lives in western Cary. “You don’t think you’re going to come across something that nobody’s ever seen.”

Michael Mendy dies of CJD

But they had. Dozens of specialists and three years of suffering brought no diagnosis. Michael died a year ago, at age 16. And only then did the explanation and the terrible significance of his case emerge.

Doctors estimate that fewer than one in 100 million young people will share Michael’s journey. The sports nut and East Cary Middle School student was killed by a disease that mostly afflicts the elderly. Michael was a heart-wrenching outlier, apparently among the youngest ever to suffer a spontaneous ravaging of the brain.

biosolids land application

Kathleen Mendy thinks it started on Michael’s 13th birthday in 2009. On that January day, another boy knocked Michael’s head to the court during a basketball game. He was playing again a minute later, his mother watching with a tinge of worry.

The symptoms of a years-long illness crept in that weekend, during a mother-son Super Bowl trip to Florida. That’s where she first saw Michael’s confusion, his unsure movements and his inexplicable crying.

It seemed at first like the troubling wake of the teen’s second concussion in three months, but that theory would erode and change. Across the next three years, in a nightmare that kept unfolding, the brawny teenager would drop almost half his body weight, spend months in the hospital, lose his speech and lay debilitated by simple infections.

The printed record of Michael’s hospital visits and test appointments is three and a half pages long. It documents an increasingly desperate search, listing 140 days in the hospital, 91 visits with doctors and 426 therapy appointments from 2009 to 2012.

“I always thought he would get better,” Kathleen Mendy said. “I used to always tell him, ‘Michael, one day you’re just going to run out of your bedroom, and you’re going to come running downstairs, and you’re going to be all better.’ ”

land application sewage sludge

While his friends went on to high school, Michael was confined to a wheelchair and fed through a tube. His care grew so intense that his mother brought on a full-time medical aide. His father, divorced from his mother, drove in from Florida each time he entered the hospital, and Kathleen Mendy’s family often visited from New York. Each treatment was more esoteric than the last. By the end of 2011, the Mendys had seen more than 30 doctors, medical specialists, faith healers and alternative practitioners.

“I tried chiropractors, reflexology, myofacial therapy,” Kathleen Mendy said. “I tried everything.”

The realization came to Kathleen Mendy on the last night of January 2012, the 22nd day that Michael spent in a UNC hospital bed. He’d been kept alive in an intensive-care unit by a breathing machine while an infection took hold of his lungs. The mysterious disorder had left his body unable to respond. The memory shakes Kathleen Mendy to tears. The scene sticks in her mind.

“Not until the night before he died, is when, honestly, it hit me,” she recalled.

The doctors laid a choice before his parents that night. Michael could go home with a tracheotomy and a ventilator, but they believed he’d live just a few months longer. Or doctors could remove him from life support. Michael’s parents didn’t want him to suffer anymore. He died on Feb. 1, 2012.

sewage treatment plant and disease

Only months later would Michael’s family learn the reason for his degradation and death. An autopsy showed that the teenager died of sporadic fatal insomnia, a subtype of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

“I’m so glad I didn’t know what it was” before Michael died, Kathleen Mendy said. “Because then I wouldn’t have had hope.”

“This disease is a descent into hell,” said Florence Kranitz, president of The Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Foundation in New York City.

She saw her own husband die in 2001 of an ailment similar to Michael’s. Since then she has heard the stories of many of the 300 CJD victims her organization identifies each year, including cases of fatal insomnia.

“We get this phone call, and tragically it’s the same phone call over and over again,” Kranitz said. “They’ve never heard of this disease.”

The story she heard from Kathleen Mendy fit the profile, with one beguiling exception. Almost everyone afflicted by CJD subtypes are older than 45, except those who contract a variant of the disease genetically or through contaminated beef, which Michael had not.

biosolids land application and disease

Michael’s case quickly drew the attention of national experts, including Pierluigi Gambetti, director of the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center in Ohio. Gambetti, a pioneering researcher, examined Michael’s brain and in April identified his disease as sporadic fatal insomnia.

He’d later take hours to talk with Kathleen Mendy about her son’s death. Sporadic fatal insomnia and CJD, he explained, are part of the still-mysterious field of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Some of these ravages of the brain, such as so-called mad cow disease (another form of prion disease), begin with an infection of prions, or pathogenic proteins, from the outside. CJD in the young also can be caused by prions, often transmitted during surgery.

Prions and Prusiner win Nobel Prize

Like a virus, a prion can essentially “breed.” The virus hijacks human cells, and the prion reshapes other proteins into its own mutated form. And when a prion or virus propagates enough, it can destroy its host.

But there’s a crucial difference: The prion also can come from within. Gambetti believes that Michael’s disease began when the boy’s brain misfolded a protein, creating a prion instead. The defect may then have multiplied out of control and ruined the delicate balance of the body.

It’s not uncommon for the body to make mistakes. Neurons and other cells normally catch and eliminate prions before they replicate. These defensive systems may grow weaker with age; some people may also inherit weaker defenses.

But Michael was a teenager, with no apparent family history of neurodegenerative diseases. Gambetti put the odds of such a case at one in 100 million in the general population; another doctor said it was one in 600 million. In fact, Michael may be among the youngest ever to be affected by a neurodegenerative disease without an inherited or outside cause.

“We just haven’t seen this disease affect someone this young,” said John Trojanowski, a professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Gambetti, who played a key role in the discovery of fatal insomnia, theorizes that Michael’s illness was random, despite the odds. It may be that, by chance or some unknown factor, Michael’s brain perfectly bred its own pathogen.

“The bodies of all animals are a marvel of things, in positive and negative,” Gambetti said. “They can do things striking for the good, but also for the bad.”

Nearly a year after Michael’s death, Kathleen Mendy finds love and support from family, friends and Compassionate Friends, a local group. But the extreme rarity of Michael’s case is isolating.

When she attended a CJD conference last summer with her twin sister, they met the families of people who had mostly died in middle and old age.

Some nights she goes up to her only child’s room. It’s lined with dozens of sports team caps and trophies. Athletes’ names are still painted on the blades of his ceiling fan, and the UNC comforter is still on his bed. All that’s new is the shrine on the desk, where Michael’s photo stands near a glazed statue of praying hands.

“Sometimes I think I’m OK, and other times it’s like it just happened last night. It’s like a rollercoaster,” Kathleen Mendy said.

She may have as many logical answers now as she’ll ever get – a medical, if not a spiritual description of why Michael died.

She still doesn’t know what it was that made her son vulnerable. She believes Michael’s concussions triggered his illness, but his doctors haven’t confirmed the idea.

“I’m a little bit resolved that I’ll never hear the answer,” she said. “It would be nice to know, but if I don’t know it, it’s not what matters now.”

She finds hope instead in the idea that she could help others; she’s thinking of writing a book and becoming a public advocate for those who suffer with CJD.

Meanwhile, as Michael’s birthday and the first anniversary of his death approach, Gambetti and one of Michael’s former doctors are preparing to present his case to their respective medical communities. As painful as the case is, “its rarity may contribute to expand the knowledge on this terrible disease,” according to Gambetti.

He hopes his research will one day allow much earlier diagnosis and treatment of fatal insomnia. Such a breakthrough could key medical progress across the spectrum of prion-related diseases, which are fatal in practically all cases.

Gambetti’s research into Michael’s case will soon yield a more immediate result too: He’ll be able to tell caregivers that sporadic fatal insomnia can strike not just the mature, but perhaps people who are just beginning their lives.

And with Michael’s story spreading, the next stricken family may at least know the harrowing path ahead.

Original Post At: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/01/19/2619247/at-last-answers-to-a-mothers-grief.html

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Takes Teenager

Girl Died Rapidly From Neurological Disorder

When 15-year-old Claire McVey appeared reluctant to eat in front of her family, her mother Annie assumed she was just having teen wobbles about her weight. But Claire was showing the first signs of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (prion disease) or vCJD – a condition that would leave the bubbly teenager dead within six months. It’s the human form of mad cow disease and an overall prion epidemic that is spreading exponentially.

annie and claire mcvey

It was in 1996 that Annie, like all mothers, was horrified to learn that dozens of people had been infected with an incurable degenerative brain condition caught by eating beef from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy or BSE (there are other vectors of concern).

“Being vegetarian, I always cooked meat-free dishes at home but my two children would occasionally eat meat elsewhere,” says Annie who lives in Kentisbury Ford in Devon. “When I heard about BSE being passed on to humans I was horrified. I wasn’t going to risk my children’s health so I immediately stopped Claire and her brother from eating all meat. What I didn’t know was that it was already too late.”

It was four years later, in July 1999, that Annie, who worked as a risk manager at their local district hospital, first noticed her daughter had become withdrawn and was behaving oddly.

“She stopped eating in front of us,” she recalls. “At first I thought she might be developing an eating disorder but it was more an anxiety about people seeing her eat. Then she started to have an issue about going to school and she didn’t want to wear her shoes. I couldn’t understand what had got into her.”

Worried, Annie took Claire to see their GP, who diagnosed the teenager with suspected depression. But still feeling uneasy about her daughter’s behavior, she arranged for Claire to see a pediatrician.

“After carrying out a neurological examination he told me that he suspected Claire had a brain tumor,” recalls Annie. “My world just fell apart.”

land application sewage sludge

Claire was immediately admitted to Frenchay Children’s Hospital in Bristol, 100 miles away, for more tests.

“Over the next week she was tested from head to toe,” says Annie. “She had MRI scans, a lumbar puncture, biopsies, neurological testing and seemingly every blood test going but the doctors couldn’t find anything.”

Yet Claire’s health was deteriorating rapidly. She had trouble with her balance, felt very weak and couldn’t walk.

“Eventually, they told me the news I’d dreaded the most,” recalls Annie. “Claire had suspected vCJD. It was like being punched in the stomach. I knew what it meant. Claire was being handed a death sentence.”

Since doctors are not able to confirm a patient had vCJD until a brain biopsy is conducted after their death, there were no more answers.

All Annie could do was take Claire back to the home they shared with Annie’s partner, Wayne, and Claire’s older brother.

“Back home, Claire asked me if she was going to die,” recalls Annie. “All I could say was that I didn’t know. She said she was scared that it would hurt, so I promised Claire that if there was any pain I would make sure it was relieved. She seemed eerily calm, like she’d accepted her fate. I could hardly believe what was happening.”

Over the next four months, Claire grew weaker and weaker, rapidly becoming less and less mobile. She was on medication to ease her anxiety and painkillers for her muscle spasms. She needed help dressing herself and eating and drinking but as she didn’t want to go back to hospital, a place was arranged for Claire at Little Bridge House, a children’s hospice in Fremington near Barnstaple. There, staff doted on Claire and she was able to find peaceful moments, listening to music in their sensory room.

“As time went on she couldn’t move at all,” says Annie. “She began to slur her speech and I wondered if she’d remember me the next day.”

biosolids land application and disease

Claire spent Christmas at home, returning to the hospice a few days later. She had been excited about the millennium New Year’s Eve but, fading rapidly, she slept through all the celebrations.

“The next morning she couldn’t believe she’d missed it all,” says Annie. “When the nurse asked what she’d like for breakfast she requested Buck’s Fizz! Then she asked to be lifted into her chair so she could go around and say ‘Happy New Year’ to everyone. I think that was her way of saying goodbye – she died 10 days later on January 11. Her brother and I were sat by her side as Claire slipped away in her sleep.”

Over the following months the pain of losing her daughter took its toll and in November 2000 Annie began to experience problems with her own health. She was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and chronic fatigue. She developed an autoimmune disorder, which left her weak and immobile. Too weak to get out of bed, Annie felt eaten up by grief.

“I was in a terrible place,” she says. “I was devastated, frustrated and unable to do anything. All I could think about was Claire and what had happened to her. I felt consumed by anger that the government compensation promised was taking so long, not just for me, but for the vCJD families still caring for people. These families were going through the worst time of their lives and finding the process of getting compensation very difficult. I wanted to do something to help but the legal process confused me. I needed to understand it, to make sense of it, so in 2004 I decided to study law through the Open University,” says Claire. “My aim was to support families so they could get a care package and be compensated fairly.”

Wheelchair-bound and still suffering from debilitating fatigue, Annie made it her mission to complete her degree.

During her six years of study with the OU she put her learning into practice, too, regularly fighting tooth and nail for the rights of other vCJD families (prion disease). Although Annie, now 54, did receive a payout in 2006, she was dismayed by the system that compensated families purely on the basis of how well they could express the severity of their suffering. So in 2010, she and other families took their case to the High Court, claiming the compensation scheme was flawed. Although their challenge and a subsequent Court of Appeal action failed, Annie was able to find peace in the fact she had done everything she could.

prion disease epidemic

“The judge said he sympathized with our case but he had to apply legal principles,” she says. “It was disappointing but we kept it in the public eye for a long time. We made our mark.”

Later that year, Annie graduated with a Bachelor of Law honors degree, which she dedicated to Claire’s memory during the ceremony. She now plans to take a masters degree in Medical Ethics.

“I cannot praise the Open University enough,” she says. “It allows people like me, who can’t go to university full time, to study for a degree. The quality of the courses and the support they have given me has been excellent.”

And Annie is still putting her studies to good use.

“There are so many downtrodden people out there because they don’t know where to start with the law,” she says. “I work for a couple of unions, looking at cases, giving them advice, assisting their members and helping them with personal injury claims.

“When you have a law degree in a small town, everyone comes for help. I’m very busy and quite content with that. I can’t think of anything more worthwhile.”

And despite the hardships she has endured, she remains upbeat.

“Losing Claire was the worst moment of my life,” she says. “I’m in a life that doesn’t feel real. I’m waiting for my girl to come back but she won’t. It is a physical pain. But what I went through was nothing compared to Claire.

“I’ve had a good life. I may be incapacitated but whenever I feel sorry for myself she pops into my head. Claire was interested in law and she might well have gone on to study it herself if she’d had the chance. She missed out on so many chances so I’m determined to make the most of mine.”

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.

Another Case Of Mad Cow Disease In U.S.

Mad Cow Disease Exposes Prion Mismanagement

The random testing system for BSE (mad cow disease) caught another dairy cow last year in Central California. The good news is that the meat was kept from the food supply. The question is whether or not humans consumed her milk? Or that of other animals that never exhibited clinical signs of the disease, but were carriers of deadly prions–as officials claim happened in Brazil recently.

mad cow disease

What also isn’t addressed is the fact that prions have been found in the saliva of cattle. We must assume that prions are in urine, feces, blood and milk at the very least. Therefore, how much land, water, equipment and livestock does a prion carrier contaminate among the path to its demise? Why did they reopen the dairy where the cow with BSE came from?

The soil, pens, water tanks, and milk stalls were all likely exposed to prions, which can’t be sterilized. Why are we still marketing beef tongue? Why do we allow untested livestock to roam public lands, where they can expose wildlife to prions and visa versa. Why do we render untested animals and use the byproducts in pet food, lotions, gel caps and other products that are potential prion pathways? Why are we sending hunters into CWD zones to kill and consume sick deer, elk, and moose? Are they informed of the prion dangers to their homes and families when animals subsequently test positive (weeks later if tested at all)? Why are we killing wolves in states such as Wisconsin, Wyoming and Minnesota and others that have chronic wasting disease among wildlife? Wolves can help limit the spread of deadly prions by taking down sick animals as soon as they become weakened by the disease.

What are we doing to protect our blood supplies and dental equipment? Shouldn’t we start treating Alzheimer’s disease like a prion disease and put up the appropriate safeguards in our homes, hospital and communities?

Alzheimer's disease prevention

Given the amount of people with Alzheimer’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we undoubtedly have contaminated our sewage systems with deadly prions (again, prions are in urine, feces, blood, milk and other bodily fluids–ask a surgeon or a coroner). Therefore, why are we recycling waste water and disease via water and biosolids? Prions cannot be neutralized or removed from sewage. Spreading them on golf courses, parks and crops is not a great idea.

land application sewage sludge

The prion peril is real. We can’t afford to mismanage this issue or misinform stakeholders.  Unlike radiation, prions do not have a half life. They grow exponentially and they seem to mutate along the way. There is not a cure for prion disease in any species. Since so much is still unknown, we must assume that all mammals are ravaged by prions in a similar manner. Therefore, we can’t afford to duplicate studies among all species before we alter policies, procedures and overall safeguards accordingly for the sake of better prion management and containment. It’s better to error on the safe side of prion management, if we are to error at all. The following video is an interesting punctuation point.

http://www.examiner.com/video/u-s-finds-first-case-of-mad-cow-disease-six-years

public relations firm USA

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. Alzheimer’s disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, chronic wasting disease and the prion disease epidemic is an area of special expertise. Please contact Gary Chandler to join our coalition for reform gary@crossbow1.com.