Wakatobi A Diver’s Paradise

World-Class Scuba Diving Across Indonesia

Indonesia has some of the best scuba diving and snorkeling destinations in the world. Wakatobi National Park is one of the most fascinating diving destinations in all of Indonesia.

Wakatobi (pronounced WAHK-kah-TOH-bee) features a luxury dive resort in southeastern Sulawesi, Indonesia. The area includes 143 islands, but only four of them are inhabited. Since 2005 the park has been listed as a tentative World Heritage Site. In 2012 it was added to the World Network of Biosphere Reserves.

Wakatobi was established following an extensive search to identify the perfect location for a dive resort in terms of geography, climate, oceanic topography and marine biodiversity. To ensure its future, the developers created one of the largest privately protected marine reserves in the world.

Wakatobi is the third largest marine park in Indonesia. It hosts 942 fish species and 750 coral reef species, versus 50 in the Caribbean and 300 in the Red Sea. Wakatobi covers 1.4 million hectares. It includes the highest number of reef and fish species in the world. The islands form the largest barrier reef in Indonesia, second only to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. Jacques Cousteau called the Wakatobi area an “Underwater Nirwana.”

Wakatobi scuba dive

Having identified the premier location, the developers built an island paradise with the essential facilities and comforts to make an unforgettable dive trip. From shore or by boat, you have exclusive access to 50 dive sites, miles of pristine reefs, where diverse and dramatic undersea landscapes harbor the highest level of marine biodiversity on the planet. New and undocumented species continue to be discovered at Wakatobi.

The House Reef is a cornucopia of marine life, which you can enter directly from the beach or the jetty. The coral top is host to sea grass offering refuge to species such as filefish, blue ringed octopus and bumphead parrotfish, while the corals are home to numerous colorful juveniles of many species. The dramatic drop off where the wall begins offers glimpses out into the blue and down the wall – turtles, bumphead parrotfish, rays, mild mannered triggerfish, box fish and puffer fish can be seen among many other species.

Wakatobi’s resident octopus can put on quite a show for those who know where to look. The creature displays native cunning; it adapts, and learns and you’ll find it lurking on the reefs of Wakatobi. Octopi truly are among the ocean’s most intriguing animals. The reefs and shallows around Wakatobi are home to several dozen species of these stealthy cephalopods, and should you spot one, you are in for an entertaining treat. Some are masters of camouflage and misdirection, while others use a combination of natural cover and improvised props to cloak their movements.

In a tranquil island setting far from crowds and cities, with no other divers for at least 100 miles, Wakatobi seamlessly blends five-star amenities and civilized comforts with a pristine natural environment; a pairing that has secured its reputation as one of the world’s finest resorts.

Underwater visibility is mostly between 20 and 50 meters. You can enjoy diving 365 days a year at Wakatobi. The climate is drier than most parts of Indonesia, and the surrounding reefs and islands protect the area from major storms.

Whether you are a non-diver or would simply like to take a break from the scheduled dives, Wakatobi offers a several non-diving activities, both water-based and on land, to absorb you whether you are looking for physical or intellectual distraction.

Visitors also enjoy kite surfing, paddle boarding, yoga, meditation, nature walks and village tours.

The inhabited islands are home to about 100,000 people, including the Bajo communities. The Bajo are seafaring nomads who inhabit many of Indonesia’s remote islands. They believe that they direct descendants of the sea. Once known as nomadic sea gypsies, the children are taught to hunt and preserve the ocean. They also possess unbelievable skills such as walking on the ocean floor and diving at depths of 25-50 meters without the aid of scuba gear. They can survive for months at sea without food supplies or modern equipment.

Anano Beach is a great place to observe sea turtles in their natural habitat. The incredible white sandy beach is home to two types of sea turtles, Honu (green turtles) and Koila (hawksbill turtles). Depending on the timing of your trip, you might get to see the turtles spawn, hatch and migrate to sea. The optimal time to observe spawning is during the full moon where green turtles usually gather at the shoreline in preparation to lay their eggs in the early hours of the morning. This enchanting beach is also a popular spot for divers and sun loungers.

Adventurers also enjoy the majestic Lakasa cave, which is is filled with beautiful stalactites and stalagmites. The cave descends 120 meters. Locals believe that it has mystical properties. East and West come together at Wakatobi’s spa, which blends the best of Indonesian and European traditions.

Read The Full Story About Wakatobi, Sulawesi, Indonesia

PR firm firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow is an award-winning and record-setting communications firm. We influence public opinion, public policy and business decisions around the world. We’re helping stakeholders tackle some of the most urgent issues of our time. Our headquarters are in Denver, Colorado. We’re opening a new office in Phoenix, Arizona. Our CEO is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia.

language and travel guide Indonesia Gary Chandler

Travel Guide To Indonesia Promotes Conservation

Travel To Bali, Borneo, Java, Sumatra

Indonesia is an amazing country with ancient temples, beautiful beaches, hundreds of volcanoes, endangered wildlife, and abundant natural resources.

If you are planning a vacation or expedition to Bali, Java, Borneo or beyond, the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia is one of the best books available. It’s a comprehensive travel guide, which includes an Indonesian phrase and grammar book and a dictionary to help you learn Bahasa Indonesia.

Indonesia language and travel guide

Indonesia includes some of the largest and most exotic islands in the world, including Bali, Borneo, Java, Komodo, New Guinea, and Sumatra. There are more than 17,500 islands in all.  Indonesia shares two of its largest islands with other countries. The Indonesian state of Papua, formerly known as Irian Jaya, occupies the western half of New Guinea—the world’s second largest island.  Indonesia also controls part of the island of Borneo, which is the third-largest island in the world. Indonesia shares the island of Borneo with Brunei and Malaysia. Indonesia’s share of Borneo is called Kalimantan.

Indonesia deforestation and endangered species

In addition to these large islands, Indonesia controls all of Sumatra, which is the sixth-largest island in the world. Meanwhile, Sulawesi and Java rank as the 11th and 13th largest islands on the planet. Java is the most populous of the Indonesian islands—more than 60 percent of all Indonesians live here—and it is the most populated island in the world. Java is home to the capital city of Jakarta, where about 25 million people live. Despite the population density on Java, hundreds of other islands in the country are uninhabited.

Lombok tourism

Speak Indonesian To Open Hearts and Doors

The real beauty of Indonesia is found in the eyes and smiles of its people. Taking the time to learn some simple Indonesian words and phrases will help you unveil more of this country’s wonderful treasures.

Sumatra wildlife

Most Indonesians are happy, friendly, and curious people. They often will speak to you as you cross paths. They typically will ask where you are from and where you are going. When you have the opportunity, try to converse with locals. It can be educational, informative, and rewarding. Most Indonesian people know at least a few English words and are eager to learn more. Many Indonesians are very articulate in English, especially those involved in tourism, retail, and international business.

Gary Chandler

For more information, or to purchase a copy of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia by Gary R. Chandler please visit http://indonesiantravelbook.com/bali

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Learn To Speak Bahasa Indonesia

Pronunciation Key To Indonesian Language

This video tutorial from Gary R. Chandler, author of the Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia, will introduce you to the fundamentals of the Indonesian language (Bahasa Indonesia). Indonesia is one of the most amazing and diverse countries in the world.  It has ancient temples, beautiful beaches, hundreds of volcanoes, exotic wildlife, and abundant natural resources.

Indonesia includes some of the largest and most famous islands in the world, including Bali, Borneo, Java, Komodo, New Guinea, and Sumatra—more than 17,500 islands in all.

Indonesia deforestation and endangered species

The real beauty of Indonesia is found in the eyes and smiles of its people. Taking the time to learn some simple Indonesian words and phrases will help you unveil more of this country’s wonderful treasures. Most Indonesians are happy, friendly, and curious people. They often will speak to you as you cross paths. They typically will ask where you are from and where you are going. When you have the opportunity, try to converse with locals. It can be educational, informative, and rewarding. Most Indonesian people know at least a few English words and are eager to learn more. Many Indonesians are very articulate in English, especially those involved in tourism, retail, and international business.

Lombok tourism

This language and travel guide will help you get the most from your trip by guiding you to sites and towns to visit, activities to enjoy, and places to stay. It also will help you find the right Indonesian words to use at the right time. In addition to the book, we are launching a series of video tutorials to help you learn the most important words and how to pronounce the most important Indonesian words.

Sumatra Indonesia

For more information, please visit http://indonesiantravelbook.com/bali/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Learn To Speak Indonesian

Learn Bahasa Indonesia

Indonesia is a beautiful country full of natural and man-made wonders. It has ancient temples, beautiful beaches, hundreds of volcanoes, endangered wildlife, and abundant natural resources. This book will help you get the most from your trip by guiding you to sites and towns to visit, activities to enjoy, and places to stay. It also will help you find the right Indonesian words to use at the right time.

Indonesia language and travel guide

Indonesia includes some of the largest and most exotic islands in the world, including Bali, Borneo, Java, Komodo, New Guinea, and Sumatra. There are more than 17,500 islands in all.  Indonesia shares two of its largest islands with other countries. The Indonesian state of Papua, formerly known as Irian Jaya, occupies the western half of New Guinea—the world’s second largest island.  Indonesia also controls part of the island of Borneo, which is the third-largest island in the world. Indonesia shares the island of Borneo with Brunei and Malaysia. Indonesia’s share of Borneo is called Kalimantan.

In addition to these large islands, Indonesia controls all of Sumatra, which is the sixth-largest island in the world. Meanwhile, Sulawesi and Java rank as the 11th and 13th largest islands on the planet. Java is the most populous of the Indonesian island—more than 60 percent of all Indonesians live here—and it is the most populated island in the world. Java,is home to the capital city of Jakarta, where about 25 million people live. Despite the population density on Java, hundreds of other islands in the country are uninhabited.

The real beauty of Indonesia is found in the eyes and smiles of its people. Taking the time to learn some simple Indonesian words and phrases will help you unveil more of this country’s wonderful treasures. Most Indonesians are happy, friendly, and curious people. They often will speak to you as you cross paths. They typically will ask where you are from and where you are going. When you have the opportunity, try to converse with locals. It can be educational, informative, and rewarding. Most Indonesian people know at least a few English words and are eager to learn more. Many Indonesians are very articulate in English, especially those involved in tourism, retail, and international business.

Bali tourism attractions

Essential Words and Phrases

Greetings & Small Talk

Hello.  Halo. (HAH‑loh)

How are you?  Apa kabar? (AH‑pah KAH‑bahr)

(I’m) fine/good.  Baik/bagus. (BYE‑eek, BAH‑goos)

Good morning.  Selamat pagi. (SEH‑lah‑maht PAH‑gee)

Good day. (use this from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m.)  Selamat siang. (SEH-lah-MAHT SEE-ahng)

Good afternoon. (use from 3 p.m. until dark)  Selamat sore. (SEH-lah-MAHT SOHR-reh)

Good evening. (after dark)  Selamat malam (SEH-lah-MAHT MAH-lahm)

Good night.(use when going to bed)  Selamat tidur. (SEH-lah-MAHT TEE-door)

Good bye/good trip.  Selamat jalan. (SEH‑lah‑maht JAH-lahn)

Enjoy your meal.  Selamat makan. (SEH-lah-MAHT MAH-kahn)

Enjoy your drink  Selamat minum (SEH-lah-MAHT MEE-noom)

What is your name?  Siapa nama anda? (SEE‑ah‑pah NAH‑mah AHN‑dah)

My name is ______.  Nama saya ______. (NAH‑mah SYE‑ah ______)

Where are you from?  Dari mana? (DAH‑ree MAH‑nah)

(I’m) from ________.  Dari ______. (DAH‑ree _____)

Where (are you) going?  Ke mana? (keh MAH‑nah)

(I’m going) to ________.  Ke _____. (keh ______)

 Indonesia deforestation and endangered species

Appreciation, Courtesies and Respect

Excuse me, I need help.  Tolong tanya. (TOH‑lohng TAHN‑yah)

Excuse me.  Permisi. (PEHR-mee-SEE)

I’m sorry  ma’af/sori (MAH‑ahf, SOHR-ree)

please (help me)  minta (MEEN-tah)

please (help yourself)  silahkan (SEE-lah-KHAN)

thank you  terima kasih (TEH‑ree‑mah KAH‑see)

thank you (in Balinese)  matur suksma (MAH-toor SOOK-smah)

you are welcome  sama sama (SAH‑mah SAH‑mah)

you are welcome   terimah kasih kembali (TEHR‑ree‑mah KAH‑see KEHM‑bah‑lee)

you may  boleh (BOH-lay)

welcome  selamat datang (SEH-lah-MAHT DAH-tahng)

welcome (in Balinese)  om swasti astu (OHM SWAH-stee AH-stoo)

Until we meet again.  Sampei jumpa lagi. (SAHM-pye JOOM-pah LAH-gee)

 

People

baby  bayi (BAH‑yee)

child  anak (AH‑nahk)

family/relatives  famili (FAH‑mee‑lee)

father/Mr.  bapak (BAH-pahk)

friend  teman/kawan (TEH‑mahn, KAH‑wahn)

him/her  dia (DEE-ah)

husband  suami (SOO-ah-mee)

me  saya (SYE-ah)

man  pria (PREE‑ah)

mother/Mrs.  Ibu/bu (EE-boo). It is often shortened to bu  BOO)

Ms.  nona (NO-nah)

sir  tuan (TOO-ahn)

we  kita (KEE-tah)

wife  isteri (EES-tehr-ree)

woman  wanita (WAH‑nee‑tah)

you  anda/aku (AHN-dah, AH-koo)

Below are some of the key words and phrases that you will need frequently. Start a list of the words and questions that will meet your needs. The language is structured so simply that a single word can often be a sentence, question or a response.

Gary Chandler

Asking Questions

Asking questions is fun and challenging. First of all, you will need to structure questions differently in Indonesian than in English (refer back to the grammar chapter). Secondly, be braced for answers that you may not understand. However, here are the key words you need to start forming some questions:

who  siapa (SEE‑ah‑PAH)

where  mana (MAH‑nah)

when  kapan (KAH‑pahn)

why  kenapa (KEH‑nah‑pah)

what  apa (AH‑pah)

how  bagaimana (BAH‑gay‑MAH‑nah)

Sumatra Indonesia

Answering Questions

I only speak a little Indonesian.  Saya bisa bahasa Indonesia sedikit. (SYE-ah BEE-sah BAH-hah-sah EEN-doh-NEES-ee-ah SEH-dee-keet)

I don’t know.  Tidak tahu. (TEE-dahk TAH-hoo)

I don’t want it.  Tidak mau. (TEE-dahk MAH-oo)

later  nanti (NAHN-tee)

no  tidak (TEE‑dahk)

not yet  belum (BEH-loom)

OK  OK (OH‑kay)

yes  ya (yah)

Explore Sulawesi Indonesia

Other Helpful Words

address  alamat (AH‑lah‑MAHT)

age  umur (OO‑moor)

attention  perhatian (PEHR-hah-TEE-ahn)

book  buku (BOO‑koo)

careful  hati‑hati/awas (HAH‑tee HAH‑tee, AH-wahs)

closed  tutup (TOO‑toop)

country  negara (NEH‑gahr‑RAH)

map  peta (PEH‑tah)

marital status  kawin (KAH‑ween)

name  nama (NAH-mah)

occupation  pekerjaan (PEHK‑ehr‑jahn)

open  buka (BOO‑kah)

place of birth  tempat lahir (TEHM‑paht LAH‑eer)

religion  agama (AH‑gah‑MAH)

restroom/toilet  kamar kecil/toilet/W.C. (KAH‑mahr KEH‑cheel)

signature  tanda tangan (TAHN‑dah TAHN‑gahn)

word  kata (KAH-tah)

Gary R. Chandler

Useful Phrases

Food and Drink

I’m thirsty.  Saya haus.

I want/need a drink.  Saya mau minum.

I’m hungry.  Saya lapar.

I want/need some food.  Saya mau makan.

May I have one?  Boleh saya minta satu?

That’s all.  Ini saja.

 Where is a place to eat?  Rumah makan dimana?

 What is this?  Apa ini? 

I don’t want ice.  Tidak mau es.

Without ice!  Tanpa es!

One more.  Satu lagi.

Two more.  Dua lagi.

I’ve had enough. Thank you.  Sudah cukup. Terima kasih.

Money

Where is a bank?  Bank di mana?

 I want to exchange some American dollars.  Saya mau tukar uang dolar Amerika.

 How much does this cost?  Berapa harga ini?

Indonesian children smile

Hotel

I need a hotel. Where is one?  Saya mau hotel. Di mana?

 Where is my room?  Kamar saya di mana?

 May I have my room key?  Minta kunci kamar?

 Room number.  Nomar kamar.

Small Talk

I’m from America.  Saya dari Amerika.

 I don’t speak Indonesian, yet.  Belum bisa bahasa Indonesia.

 I only speak a little Indonesian.  Saya bisa bahasa Indonesia sedikit.

I’m just walking around.  Jalan‑jalan.

Are you married?  Anda kawin?

 Do you have children?  Berapa anak anda?

 Not yet.  Belum.

 Is there a person here who speaks English?  Ada orang di sini yang bicara bahasa Inggris?

Do you speak English?  Saudara bisa berbicara bahasa Inggris?

I do not understand.  Saya tidak mengerti.

Thank you.  Terima kasih.

 No (as in no way).   Tidak.

I can (am able).  Bisa.

Can’t do (it).   Tidak Bisa.

Do not do _______.  Tidak jangan ______.

Do not do that.  Angan begitu.

endangered orangutan

Time & Travel

What time is it now?  Jam berapa sekarang? 

When will it/they be ready?  Kapan selesai?

How many hours from Ubud to Kuta?  Dari Ubud ke Kuta berapa jam?

How many hours to Jakarta?  Berapa jam ke Jakarta?

I want to go to the hotel.  Saya mau pergi ke hotel.

I want to go to the airport.  Saya mau ke airport.

I want to go to the beach.  Saya mow ke pantai.

I want to go to _______.  Saya mau ke _______.

Where is the road to the beach?  Jalan ke pantai di mana?

Where is the road to the hotel?  Jalan ke hotel di mana?

Where is the road to ______?  Jalan ke ______ di mana?

Let’s go.  Ayo.

Shopping

Where is a pharmacy?  Apotik di mana?

 I want ______.  Saya mau _____.

I want to buy _______.  Saya mau beli _____.

(I) already have (that, one).  Sudah punya.

What time do they open?  Buka jam berapa?

I don’t want.  Tidak mau.

I’m just looking.  Lihat‑lihat saja.

Please wait a moment.  Tunggu sebentar.

May I see (it)?  Bisa lihat?

Can we bargain?  Bisa tawar?

Excuse me. Get in line. (Don’t cut in front of me.)  Ma’af, antrean!

How much does this cost?  Harga?

How much (is it)?  Berapa harganya?

For more information, or to purchase the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia, visit: http://indonesiantravelbook.com/bali/

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.

Language and Travel Guide To Indonesia

Indonesia Travel Guide Promotes Wildlife Conservation

Gary R. Chandler, a public affairs and sustainability consultant, just published the second edition of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia (Hippocrene Books, New York, NY). Chandler will use the book to help this Indonesia develop more eco-tourism opportunities, which can help the local populations preserve the vanishing rainforest, while discouraging illegal wildlife poaching.

The new book offers travelers valuable insights and tips for a variety of activities, including jungle adventures, wildlife viewing, volcano treks, scuba diving, and the indulgence of Bali’s spas and resorts.  The new guidebook also includes a dictionary and phrasebook to help visitors communicate effectively with anyone.

Indonesia language and travel guide

Indonesia has some of the largest and most exotic islands in the world, including Bali, Borneo, Java, Komodo, New Guinea, and Sumatra—more than 17,500 islands in all.

With more than 210 million people, Indonesia is the fourth most-populous country in the world. These islands only represent one percent of the world’s land area, but they are home to more than 10 percent of all mammal species—more known mammal species than any other country. As a result of a growing human population, Indonesia now has more endangered mammals than any other country, including the orangutan, Javan rhinoceros, Komodo dragon, Sumatran tiger, and the Sumatran elephant.

Indonesia deforestation and endangered species

“Indonesia has some of the most amazing biodiversity in the world, but many ecosystems are under siege by the economic pressures of this rapidly growing nation,” Chandler said. “The country is doing its best to balance development and conservation, but it’s a challenge. If we can help this beautiful country expand its eco-tourism opportunities, it will help the locals support their families, while defending their ecosystems, which will benefit the country and the world.”

palm oil deforestation

Indonesia has some of the most extensive biodiversity on the planet, including the world’s second-largest rainforest. Unfortunately, this island nation is growing so fast that its natural wonders are collapsing— with the thousands of creatures that call these gems home.

Lombok tourism

Chandler, founder of Crossbow Communications a public relations, public affairs and issue management firm in Denver and Phoenix, hopes to use the book to inspire more people to visit Southeast Asia. He believes that more people must see these endangered species and their endangered habitats to help save Indonesia’s tigers, orangutans, elephants, rhinos and other endangered species. His new travel guide will generate funds to promote wildlife conservation, sustainable jobs, and sustainable forestry.

Sumatra Indonesia

To help draw global attention to the problem, while promoting more sustainable alternatives, Chandler is donating all of his profits from this publication to wildlife conservation organizations in Indonesia.

“This is a fascinating country that offers something for all travelers,” Chandler said. “You don’t have to be an adventure traveler to appreciate the beauty of Indonesia.”

For more information about the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia, visit www.indonesiantravelbook.com/bali

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in international marketing, issue management and public affairs. Indonesia is one of our regions of expertise. Our President and founder is the author of the Language and Travel Guide to Indonesia. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com. Visit Indonesia.