Deforestation Contributing To Climate Change, Extinction

Forest Conservation Critical To Life

Forest conservation is critical to life as we know it. Forests sequester carbon and release oxygen. They influence rainfall, filter fresh water and prevent flooding and soil erosion. They produce wild foods, fuelwood and medicines. While the pressures on our vanishing forests vary around the world, the biggest cause of deforestation is expanding agriculture – including commercial livestock and major crops such as palm oil and soy.

Small-scale farmers also play a role as they often slash and burn land every year just to survive. Mining, hydroelectricity and new roads add to the pressure on vanishing forests around the globe.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

Deforestation has caused about 20 percent of the rise in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The rise in greenhouse gases, both human caused and natural, is contributing to unprecedented levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, which contributes to climate change, extreme weather and threats to life as we know it.

Deforestation also cripples our planet’s capacity to capture carbon from the atmosphere, while contributing to the loss of endangered species, including orangutans, tigers, elephants and many others.

Trees and forests can capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air, return the oxygen to the atmosphere and store the carbon for centuries. Deforestation is disrupting this vital system, while contributing to global warming and climate change.

Forests can absorb some of the carbon dioxide that we all produce in our daily lives. Unfortunately, our remaining forests are under siege. We can reverse the trend now by demanding forest conservation and reforesting as much land as possible.

If we could stop tropical deforestation today, allow damaged forests to grow back, and protect mature forests, the resulting reduction in emissions and removal of carbon from the atmosphere could equal up to one-third of current global emissions from all sources. Reforestation is a critical part of the solution to many of our most pressing sustainability challenges.

Many developing countries have indicated that they would be willing to reduce emissions further in return for international financial support. Rich countries could do more to fight climate change at lower cost by financing tropical forest conservation in addition to their own domestic emission cuts. The few REDD+ agreements already in place have priced avoided CO2 emissions at only $5 per ton, truly a bargain compared to most other options.

In both Brazil and Indonesia, national efforts to reduce deforestation have been associated with greater transparency, increased law enforcement targeted at forest-related crime and corruption and steps to strengthen the land rights of indigenous peoples. A broad coalition of governments, multinational corporations, non-governmental organizations and indigenous groups recognized these potential benefits in the September 2014 New York Declaration on Forests.

wildlife conservation Africa

Stakeholders across East Africa are ready to act now. They can help us all fight global climate change, while defending critical ecosystems in Tanzania, Kenya and beyond.

We have approved plans to plant more than 110 million new trees on millions of hectares in Tanzania and Kenya alone. We’re developing more reforestation and agroforestry projects around the world, which will:

  • Absorb carbon dioxide to battle climate change;
  • Defend ecosystems and biodiversity;
  • Preserve watersheds and control flooding;
  • Preserve and create habitat for wildlife;
  • Preserve local lifestyles and cultures, while promoting sustainability; and
  • Create jobs for men and women that can help defend endangered ecosystems.

A new report by the United Nations Environment Programme says that protecting East Africa’s mountain ecosystems would safeguard the region’s $7 billion tourism industry, not to mention the lives of millions of people and iconic endangered species.

“Across the continent, the damage done to these ecosystems is depriving people of the basic building blocks of life,” said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment agency.

He said Mt. Kilimanjaro was an example of how climate change was severely damaging Africa’s mountains and the people who depend on them. Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest in Africa, contributes to more than a third of Tanzania’s revenue from tourism but is facing several problems, ranging from shrinking glacier to rampant wild fires. As climate change intensifies, it is essential that governments act swiftly to prevent more harm and more downward momentum. The report urges Tanzania to protect the mountain’s water catchment area by reforestation, investing in early warning systems and making climate adaptation a top priority.

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Technology Can’t Save Biodiversity

Technology Not The Solution To Climate Change

Denying the contributions of air pollution to climate change is like trying to defy gravity. If you disagree, just see what happens when you put a running car in the garage and close the door. It will kill you.

Our atmosphere also is a confined space and we are pumping it full of toxins and greenhouse gasses every minute. It isn’t going anywhere. It’s building up, adding to the greenhouse effect, and contributing to toxic buildup. Of course, the atmosphere and ecosystems are more complex than that, but the atmosphere can only absorb so much abuse before it fights back.

Save Kilimanjaro ecosystem

I’m not writing to preach about alternative energy. This is about forest conservation and life as we know it. Whether you believe in god or mother nature, forests are here for a reason. The biodiversity within those forests is here for a reason. We are all part of this web of life and to think that one component of the web is less important than another is naive. Humanity has raped the planet almost beyond recognition already. It’s time to turn back the clock.

We can’t restore rainforests as well as the original. Therefore, we have to draw the line on deliberate destruction immediately. We must reforest immediately. We can create clean jobs. We can preserve watersheds and wildlife. We can attempt to restore the natural balance.

wildlife conservation Tanzania

The Kilimanjaro ecosystem, for example, is on the verge of collapse. Once it reaches a tipping point, there will be no turning back. Millions of people more will die or be displaced. Endangered species will go extinct. People in that region are screaming for help now.

I’m pursuing rainforest restoration/conservation projects as a hobby and I’m prioritizing my time and my money into natural solutions. I’m not giving up on technology and conservation, but ecosystems are brilliant creations. We need to make them our top priority in a holistic sense. The human population has already exceeded capacity of the planet. You don’t have to be a scientist to know that a rising human population and diminishing natural resources is a formula for disaster.

forest conservation Tanzania and Kenya

Environmental diseases and disasters are fighting back at humanity more than ever now. The sewage nightmare is already killing us thanks to unstoppable and very transmissible forms of prion disease. There isn’t any technology available to cure these diseases. There isn’t any technology available that is going to heal the planet. It’s time for humanity to quit being arrogant about very basic aspects of life. It’s time invest in nature more than ever. It’s better to be good and fast than perfect and late.

If you ant to help fight climate change, while protecting endangered species, please visit http://sacredseedlings.com/climate-change-and-forest-conservation/ 

public relations firm and public affairs firm Denver and Phoenix

Crossbow Communications specializes in issue management and public affairs. It’s also promoting forest conservation, reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and wildlife conservation through its subsidiary–Sacred Seedlings. Please contact Gary Chandler at gary@crossbow1.com to join our network.